Drupal News

Jacob Rockowitz: Sponsor an event, a sprint, a speaker and the red button

Main Drupal Feed - Tue, 11/27/2018 - 16:49

Attending Drupal Events grows our community

In my last blog post about Talking about Advanced Webforms and Showing Code, I mentioned my presentation needed work and I needed practice. At DrupalCamp Atlanta, I was able to do just that. I delivered my 'Advanced Webform' presentation and received some very valuable constructive criticism on how to simplify and improve my slide deck from Michael Anello (ultimike).

At DrupalCamps I enjoy presenting and sharing my passion for the Webform module with the Drupal community. I also value hearing and seeing what other people are doing with Drupal. In Atlanta, listening to Jesus Manuel Olivas (jmolivas) passionately talking about using GatsbyJS with Headless Drupal was inspiring plus I want to mention that this approach represents a huge paradigm shift for all enterprise content management systems. Besides hearing about the latest and greatest technologies at DrupalCamp Atlanta, I also learned how much work it is to organize a DrupalCamp.

The organizers of DrupalCamp Atlanta did a fantastic job. Kaleem Clarkson (kclarkson), one of the camp's organizers, posted a call to action for organizations using Drupal to sponsor an event

Sponsoring an event

Kaleem's post titled, Sponsoring a DrupalCamp is Not About the Return on Investment (ROI), reminds everyone of the importance and value of sponsoring a camp. He also...Read More

Acro Media: Drupal Combines Content and Commerce

Main Drupal Feed - Tue, 11/27/2018 - 15:45

If you’re evaluating CMS platforms for an upcoming project, Drupal should be one platform that you consider. It was built for generating content and also has robust ecommerce abilities through the Drupal Commerce module. If you only need to publish content, it’s great for that. If you only need ecommerce, it’s great for that, too. The fact that it does both very well is a winning combination that will always be available to you, now or down the road. This post takes a look under the hood of Drupal to show you why you might want to take a first, or second, look at the Drupal CMS.

Drupal for Content

As mentioned in the introduction, Drupal was built for content creation and it is very good at that. But, if you’re unfamiliar with Drupal, you probably wouldn’t understand WHY it works so well for this. Here are some of the things that really separate Drupal from other platforms.

Content Types

At the core of Drupal content creation is something called a Content Type. A content type is a collection of fields that are used to generate a certain type of content, such as a general page, landing page, blog post, press release, etc. It’s one of the first pieces of a new Drupal site to be configured.

Configuring content types is mostly done through Drupal’s admin user interface (UI). Through the interface, you add fields. If you think of any website form that you’ve seen in the past, the form is made up of fields for you to enter in your information. This is the same for Drupal, but you’re actually creating the fields that are used to generate content. For example, a blog post typically contains a title (text field), body (textarea field), header image (image field), publish date (date field), author and category (reference fields). For the blog content type, all of these fields would be added as well as any other that you need. The field options available a many. If you don’t see a field that you need, chances are someone has already created it and you just need to install a module that adds it in.

After all of the fields have been added, you then configure how the fields are displayed to your content creators and to the end user viewing the content. I won’t get into details here, but many fields have options for how that content gets rendered on the page. Using an image field as an example, you can choose to render the image as the original image, or as a processed image (like a thumbnail), or as the url path to the image on the server. Each option has its uses once you start theming the site.

Regions and Blocks

Keeping with the blog post example, when viewing a blog post you typically see other elements on the pages such as a subscribe form, list of recent posts, and call to actions. It doesn’t make sense to manually add these things to every single blog post, so instead we place this content in something called a Block and assign the block to a Region.

Regions are added to your page templates and are there for you to place blocks into. When adding a block into a region, each block can be configured independently of one another so that you can assign blocks to specific pages, content types, access levels (i.e. anonymous vs. logged in users), etc. A block can be many different things, but one type of block is similar to a content type in that you can add fields that are used to make up the block.

Views

A View is a powerful tool within Drupal for creating dynamic content based on other content. Views allow you to take existing content, manipulate it, and display it in another way. They can be used to create both pages and blocks.

Again, using the blog as an example, if you look at a page that is listing all of your blog posts at one time, this is most likely a view. The view is taking content generated using the blog content type, manipulating each post so that you’re only seeing specific information such as a date, title and introduction, and then adding a ‘Read More’ link after the introduction. Not only is the view manipulating each post like this, it’s also displaying the 10 most recent posts and showing you a ‘Load More’ button afterwards to load the next 10 posts.

This is a pretty simple example, but as you can see it’s quite powerful. You can use as much or as little of the content information as you need and it gives you fine-grained control to use and re-use your content in new ways. 

Metatags

Any serious content platform needs to include a robust set of metatag options. The built in metatag module for Drupal is excellent in this regard. You can set default options for every content type and override those defaults for individual pieces of content if needed. You can choose if your content should be crawled by search bots or not, how your post would appear on social media if shared, and more.

Workflows

This might not apply to you if you’re the only one creating content for your website, but, if you have a team of content creators, workflows let you assign specific permissions to your teammates. For example, you can allow your writers to draft content, your editors to approve the content, and finally a publisher can publish the content. Instead of explaining it all here, here’s a separate article and video that shows you how it works.

Modules

Anything that adds new functionality to the base Drupal platform is called a module. A module can be small (such as adding a new field type) or big (such as adding ecommerce functionality). You can separately Google “best modules for Drupal” and see a whole bunch of popular modules, but one of our favorites that I want to mention for content creation is the “Paragraphs” module. This module lets you create reusable sections of content that can be used within your content types and product pages. So, instead of just a body of text you can add cta straps, rich media, image galleries, forms, etc., all within your content. We use it on our own site to quickly make unique page layouts for our content.

Theming

Drupal’s theming engine enables your designers and front end developers to implement anything they can dream up. You have broad control over the look and feel of your site so that everything is consistent, but you can also create totally unique pieces of content or individual pages that may break away from your normal styleguide.

Say you have a new product lineup that you’re launching. You’re store branding is one thing, but this product has its own unique branding and personality that you want to convey. Well, you can give your designers full control over how the product should appear on your website and your front end developers can make it happen using the granular template override system.

Drupal for Commerce

The Commerce module for Drupal turns your Drupal site into a fully fledged ecommerce platform that is 100% capable of running any size of ecommerce site you throw at it. And remember, this is adding functionality to Drupal, so you still maintain the ability to do all of the content side of things mentioned above. 

In fact, not only can you still generate other content, but all of the things that make content creation great on Drupal also apply to the ecommerce side of your site. Your product pages are totally fieldable and themable, just like the content. You can assign blocks to your project pages. You can use views to set up your catalog and create blogs that filter out featured products or related products. Everything is fully customizable. 

There are also many modules available specifically for Commerce that give you even more functionality and integrations, and this is actually where ecommerce on Drupal becomes a “big deal”. Drupal Commerce is API first, which means that it was made to be able to connect to other services. So while you might run your ecommerce store on Drupal Commerce, you will most likely also use other software for your business accounting, marketing and customer relations, to name a few. Drupal Commerce can integrate with these services and share information in order to automate tasks.

We have a whole article that drills down on this topic and explains why ecommerce platforms like Drupal Commerce can be a great fit for your business. I would recommend reading it here.

Content and Commerce

We’ve really only scratched the surface on what Drupal can do from both a content and commerce perspective. I hope you’re beginning to see the whole picture. 

The truth is that most ecommerce platforms don’t do both content and commerce well. You can definitely find many great content creation platforms out there, but can they also do ecommerce? Likewise, there are a ton of ecommerce platforms that will sell your products, but how well can you create other content and do you have the flexibility to customize one or all product pages in the way that works best for your products. And, can you integrate that platform with other services?

These are all important questions to ask even if you don’t think you need a robust content platform or an ecommerce component now. If you think you might need it in the future, planning ahead could save you a headache later. While there are a lot of options out there and I encourage you to explore them, Drupal should be high on your list of possible options.

Try A Demo

It’s one thing to say Drupal is great at all of these things, but why not give it a try. We’ve actually created a complete Drupal demo that showcases both content and commerce together. Click the link below to check it out and see what you think. If you’re interested in exploring how Drupal can fit with your business, feel free to . We’d be happy to have that discussion with you.

Amazee Labs: DrupalCamp Ghent 2018: Recap

Main Drupal Feed - Tue, 11/27/2018 - 10:58
DrupalCamp Ghent 2018: Recap

I was lucky enough to attend the Belgian DrupalCamp along with fellow Amazees Dan and Vijay. Organized by the Drupal community, this event is held annually in different cities in Belgium.

Christophe Jossart Tue, 11/27/2018 - 11:58

Over 300 people attended this year, many of them backenders but also frontenders, designers, business strategists, and other stakeholders all coming together to share learnings, experience, and excellent local beers in the city of Ghent.

DrupalCamp Ghent was organised by the Drupal community, and we want to say  thanks to all the organisers for making all of this possible, with a special mention to Peter Decuyper who enlightened us with his sketch notes of the sessions.

It is the essence of camps to make the (difficult) choice between the sessions you will attend, so here are the highlights of the ones that we attended.

The organisers paid extra attention to the relationship between sessions, so many talks nicely complemented each other.

Decoupling and the future of Drupal: about UX, code, design and humans

The position of Drupal is constantly being re-evaluated. One of the values of the Drupal is paying attention to the people. The work of these last months brought one more time the proof of this value by covering a large variety of persona.

Authors and site builders

UX was covered in many ways, Clément Génin has been debunking the myths about user-centric design, and he explained the what by talking about a mindset and not a magic formula that can be applied on an existing project. I perceived his session as a way to build a love story between the designer and the end user.

Cristina Chumillas demonstrated the how by showing us the path that was followed for the Drupal Admin UI since 2017 and what we might expect for Drupal 8.7. If you want to help or just know more about this work, head to the Admin UI & JavaScript Modernisation strategic initiative.

Preston So gave us even more perspective, he started his keynote with the history of the Drupal frontend to continue with the emergence of wearables, digital signage, augmented reality, and conversational UI. Then, he introduced the concept of contexteless / universal editing with a multipolar Drupal that can reduce the custom work needed for decoupling. A good example of this trend is GraphQL. Content is like water: when the shape changes, it should adapt to its context rather than being context specific.

When it is about content, the editor is one of the most important stakeholders. Ruben Teijeiro provided a few answers to problems like page refresh, too much site building, or keeping the link between content editing and decoupling. Among other solutions, he mentioned modules like Elementor, Content Planner, Glazed Builder or Editable.

Designers

Dries Van Giel gave us an introduction to Sketch, a fully vector-based tool suited for web design, that leverages features like components (symbols), shared styles among documents and element export in multiple formats. This meets the current approach of component-based design (like Pattern Lab or Fractal does) and reusability.

Developers

GraphQL is all the rage nowadays, Peter Keppert talked about

  • When to use decoupling: multiple frontends for one CMS, Single Page Apps, …
  • The benefits of using GraphQL for that purpose: a self-documented schema, that is strongly typed and that allows to cache queries in the database.
  • The points that need attention compared to other solutions: possible information disclosure and the complexity that induces a change on the team.
  • The integration in the Drupal contrib ecosystem with Paragraphs and Box

Fabian Bircher explained how the Configuration Management (CMI) has evolved since Drupal 8.0. At the time, it was designed to cover the basic flow of deploying without modifications. Contributed modules have implemented several other use cases like configuration split or ignore, Drupal 8.6 added the installation of a site from a given configuration and Drupal 8.7 will introduce the new ConfigTransform service. Using Drupal as a product can also be implemented with the Config Distro module.

With his typical sense of humour, Branislav Bujisic gave us an introduction to Functional Programming. The foundation of his session was a comparison between Alan Turing states and Alonzo Church functions. He introduced concepts like immutability, static typing, and side effects elimination to improve testing and caching (memoization), with a control over complexity and more performant code. Even if PHP is not a functional language, a few of these principles can still be applied. Truly inspiring!

Testing and code quality

If you are looking for a way to contribute back to the Drupal, a lot of core and contributed projects needs manual testing. Just have a look at the 'Needs review' status on the Drupal issue queue. Automated testing is also welcomed, Brent Gees gave us all the keys to get started seamlessly with Unit, Kernel or Functional tests in his presentation How to get started with writing tests for contrib.

When it is about client work, the time that can be spent on tests may be more limited, and the approach is more about testing the assembly of components, so a pragmatic solution is to use fast Functional Testing with solutions like Behat. Tom Rogie showed how to configure Behat for several environments and browsers in a Continuous Integration workflow, but more importantly, what to test.

Improve easily the quality control tomorrow in your projects. Yauhen Zenko provided a nice way to run tools like PHP Linter, coding standards compliance and mess detection, wrapped in a Composer based solution.

Search

Joris Vercammen covered the best practices for Search API configuration, demonstrating in the meantime that most common use cases can be covered by a plain database server.

For a live demo, head to http://drupalsear.ch, that exposes most Search API features with the new Drupal Umami profile.

Advanced topics like machine learning and AI were illustrated by the maintainer of the Search API Solr Search module and the Solarium library, Markus Kalkbrenner with streaming expressions, graph queries and the inner workings of the Solr, sweet!

DevOps

Serverless is a buzzword that can lead to confusion. Slootjes explained it with Functions as a Service (FaaS) and the action of removing the hassle of server provisioning and scaling.

Thijs Feryn, the author of a Varnish book, adopted the perspective of caching by diving deep into the http protocol. It was nice to get detailed explanations about the foundations of the web and the Symfony framework. The session was also demonstrating that Drupal already implements most of the best practices regarding caching.

It was awesome to see how many things can be learned in such a small amount of time, and we are already looking forward to the next edition!

Sooper Drupal Themes: Why Drupal is the CMS of Choice for Big Enterprises and NGOs

Main Drupal Feed - Tue, 11/27/2018 - 10:32
The internet is continuously evolving and new web technologies emerge on a regular basis. Users expect more personalized experiences, greater connectivity among devices and interactive elements to guide their navigation on the web. In order to keep up-to-date, big organizations started looking into alternatives for the common practice of running websites on proprietary software which can prove to be costly to maintain in an ever-evolving market. Open source software has come a long way during the past years, and became more and more popular among big companies, governmental websites and NGOs thanks to the versatility and quality they are able to provide. Currently open source serves as the main substitute for proprietary licensed sites. Before we dive into talking about why Drupal is the CMS of choice for organizational websites, let's take a look at some of the technical terms used throughout the article:

Kalamuna Blog: Political activists at the tech conference

Main Drupal Feed - Mon, 11/26/2018 - 20:18
Political activists at the tech conference The Kalamuna Team Mon, 11/26/2018 - 12:18

This October at the Bay Area Drupal Camp (BADCamp,) we soaked up Drupal talks, gave a few of our own, high-fived friends, and fomented literary political activism. How? In line with this year’s circus theme, we turned our sponsor booth into a place for BADCampers to step right up...and send messages to their elected representatives.

Categories Articles Drupal Fun Nonprofits Author The Kalamuna Team

Book Cheapest Flight Online Ticket with Air Canada Airlines Customer Service

Drupal News Org - Mon, 11/26/2018 - 19:28

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Evolving Web: Drupal Admin UX Study: What We Can Learn from Contentful, Craft CMS, Squarespace, and WordPress

Main Drupal Feed - Mon, 11/26/2018 - 17:09

There is exciting work being done in the Drupal community to improve the Admin UI, including the JavaScript Modernization Initiative and an overhaul of the look and feel of the Seven theme. Meanwhile, I've been working with a group in the Drupal community to research what user experience improvements we should be making for content editors.

So far, we have conducted a survey to get feedback from content editors, performed a card sort to see how content editors group their tasks, and recently, conducted a comparative usability study that looks at the authoring experience provided by other content management systems.

We chose four content management systems that offer different experiences: Craft CMS, Contentful, SquareSpace, and WordPress with Gutenberg. In this article, I’ll walk through the different aspects that we tested: first impressions, the editing experience, the publishing workflow, and what we can learn.

The setup

Going through the process of setting up several other content management systems was an eye-opening experience. I highly recommend it for anyone involved in building Drupal websites for a living. The setup process gave me lots of food for thought about the onboarding experience for new users, what configuration comes out of the box, and the language and positioning of Drupal in the CMS landscape.

We recruited volunteers with Drupal content editing experience (from 1 month to 9 years of experience!)

My colleague Annika Oeser and I conducted the studies using a script that we had put together. We asked participants for their first impressions of each platform, then asked them to do a few simple tasks: creating an article from content in a Google Doc, editing and previewing it, and then deleting the content. Then, we asked what they thought of the platform.

First Impressions

First impressions are important. Each platform that we selected had some type of content editor dashboard that we presented to users. While some platforms have more of a learning curve than others, it’s obvious that platforms with a more inviting dashboard will encourage new editors to like the tool and want to use it more.

Contentful

Right away, participants found Contentful intimidating. One even said it looked “scary”. The dashboard’s messaging is not aimed at content editors (although in the setup process, it asks if you're a content editor or developer), and the terminology is just obscure enough to be intimidating. As one participant pointed out that “None of this says build an article”. That being said, the interface didn’t prevent authors from performing their task, it just made them more apprehensive.

On the content overview page, there are filters to narrow down the list of content. Because of the colorful button-like design of the filter, some participants mistook this for the link to add content.

Craft CMS

Overall, participants liked the fact that Craft CMS has a form to create content directly from the dashboard. Putting content creation forms on the dashboard makes it clear that this is a platform designed for content editors. That being said, everyone complained that the form was too narrow, and made the experience of filling in the form not great. Participants all liked it better once they were on a dedicated content creation page.

Some participants mentioned a solution, removing the “Craft News” block form the default dashboard to free up space, which is possible by configuring the dashboard if you know how to do this. I also think that having a button to expand the form or jump to the content entry page would be incredibly helpful.

Squarespace

The Squarespace dashboard gives content editors the impression that it would not be ideal for larger, more complex websites. Everyone mentioned that the UI seemed “simple” or “for a blog”. I found this an interesting observation. The editors in our study were all familiar enough with their requirements for a CMS (a large amount of content, taxonomy, content hierarchy) that they felt that the simplicity of Squarespace might be too good to be true, and that they would be alright with a more complex UI if it meant a more featureful one.

WordPress

Participants described WordPress’s dashboard as “clean”. They see right away that it's an interface designed for them. Although there are more advanced features presented (e.g. Appearance, Plugins, Tools, Settings) the UI for creating and editing content are prioritized. Granted, some of our participants had WordPress experience, giving this particular UI the bias of familiarity. One mentioned that "They don't change the interface often, which is good."

Content Editing Experience

To assess the content editor experience, we asked participants to create an article and then add some standard elements to it (an image, a link, bold text, a quote). When building the study, we selected four CMSs with very different editing experiences:

Contentful

Contentful provides a content structure similar to Drupal, with content types broken down into fields. It has some very particular terminology which will be unfamiliar to most people. Instead of a WYSIWYG editor, it provides a markdown editor with a tab for previewing the content.

It’s amazing how important labels are. Participants were confused by labels like “Slug” and the subtle difference between the purpose of the “Description” and “Body” fields. Another thing, most content editors don’t know markdown. So as much as developers might love having the markdown editor tab and a tab for previewing the content, this experience seemed like a big hurdle to content editors. A minor experience gap that we noticed was in the way the link button in the editor pre-fills “https” at the beginning of the link. Since most editors copy and paste a URL instead of write it out by hand, this led to mistakes and frustration.

Craft CMS 

Craft CMS has a WYSIWYG editor for editing long text, but instead of a large main content textarea, it provides a UI for creating sections, such as headings, text, images (this works similar to Drupal’s Paragraphs module).

All the participants easily understood the UI for adding sections to create the Article Body. It was somewhat confusing to have two ways to add some elements, for example an image or a quote can be added through a Text section, or by creating a new Image or Quote section. If anything, this maybe shows content editors’ eagerness to add content "the right way" and their willingness to work within a content structure rather than having one large WYSIWYG editor.

Squarespace

Squarespace provides a much more visual editor. The editing interface appears in an overlay. Users paste everything into one text area. There is also the notion of adding new elements (images, quotes, etc.) to this text area using a + button.

There were a couple ways to add images in Squarespace. Adding a “Thumbnail” image in the metadata of the post, which is used in the teaser version of the post. Or, using the + button to add an image element, which can then be dragged/dropped above or below other elements, such as text, buttons, etc.

None of the participants found the + button without help. I had always assumed that this UI was easy-to-use, but for a content editor not expecting to use a page building experience to add images to content, it was clearly not obvious. As one participant said "I would never have found that, it's so not clear."

Another sticking point was that the thumbnail image field in the "Options" tab doesn’t adequately explain to users that the image won’t be displayed on the full post page, only in teasers. This is something I see a lot on Drupal sites, that have images that are used in content listings, but without a proper help text to explain this to editors.

WordPress

WordPress’s new Gutenberg editing UI provides a similar experience to Squarespace, in that the editor is visual and invites users to create components, such as headings, text, columns, or media.

One participant described the interface as having an “instant preview” quality. It seemed like they thought that the way the article they were creating looked here would be how it would look as published content. "I like this a lot". "The paragraphs are clearly divided with white space". One called the different components that were created "blocks".

"The great thing here is that I can see everything". Almost all the participants brought up the fact that they assumed they could edit the HTML. "I assume I can go to the source code if I need to".

Publication Workflow

We asked authors to preview, edit, and then delete the content they had created. We knew from user surveys that content editors want autosave, but from watching them go through these steps for each CMS, we realized the anxiety that the publication workflow can cause. Content editors really want to be reassured about the state of their content.

Contentful

Contentful is designed as a backend for a decoupled website. So the preview provided is not an actual preview, but a read-only version of the fields of content you’ve created. Unsurprisingly, content editors found this confusing. In terms of workflow, users found it difficult to delete the content, because the current state of content and the fact that it needed to be unpublished before it was deleted was not clear. It seemed like the status of the content was unclear, and users ended up back on the content listing page to change the status.

Craft CMS

Craft CMS has a “Live Preview” that provides a side-by-side editing and previewing interface. All the editors liked seeing that when they add content, it looks like a page right away. One exclaimed “I'm great at this, look how good it looks.” The one part of the workflow that was confusing for editors is when they click “Save” from the initial dashboard, and they’re not redirected to the page they’re just created. If this button was "Save and preview" and it went to the edit screen with live preview, that would be more natural.

SquareSpace

SquareSpace doesn’t provide a way for authors to preview content before publishing. They expected that clicking on the content in the listing would display the preview. Saving and publishing the content was intuitive for users.

WordPress

Overall, the publishing workflow in WordPress seemed to be the most clear to users. Having the status of the content, and the links to preview, publish, and delete in close proximity seemed natural to all users. The only part that participants got stuck on was the phrase "move to trash". Some users suspected that this meant they had to empty the trash. One other sticking point was the preview. The WordPress Gutenberg UI looks so much like the front-end of a site that users are surprised or disappointed when they realize that the theme enabled on their site looks different and perhaps less good.

Takeaways

We learned a lot from this usability testing. Here are some of the most interesting takeaways:

  • Editors appreciate that a more complex UI is necessary for a more complex website. This doesn’t mean we don’t need to create a user-friendly admin UI, it just means that some degree of complexity is expected.

  • A content editor-friendly dashboard, with content-editor tasks prioritized and easy-to-understand terminology will help smooth the learning process.

  • Sometimes editors find it hard to distinguish between the admin UI and the front-end UI when learning a new platform.

  • Editors have anxiety about clicking save and what this will do. Having autosave and a clear workflow for previewing content will make this process smoother.

  • Editors feel like they should be able to edit the HTML. They don’t want to learn markdown. That being said, I think the goal of a great content authoring experience would be that authors don’t feel that they have to edit the HTML, because they have the right balance of flexibility and content structure.

  • Editors want to know what the state of their content is, and they want clear options to Preview, Save, and Delete. The state of the content and the links to change the state should be in close proximity.

  • Even with a small number of participants, usability testing can help inform improvements in a user interface. We learned a lot from testing with just 5 participants.

What’s Next?

Now that we’ve taken the pulse of how content editors interact with these CMSs, I think it would be helpful to look more closely at the experience of creating more complex content. I would like to do a follow-up study looking at authoring of structured content, something Drupal is highly valued for and excels at, and more flexible, landing-page-style content, something that Paragraphs has been widely used to for over the last couple years. I think it’s essential that Drupal provides a great interface for both these use cases (whether in core or contrib). Testing how editors edit both styles of more complex content will help us understand how to do this better.

How Can I Get Involved?

The Drupal Admin Experience group that includes Cristina ChumillasAntonella Severo, Jessica Becker, and myself. If you want to get involved, join the #admin-ui channel on the Drupal Slack.

A huge thanks to my colleague Annika for planning and running the usability testing with me and to McGill University for providing the venue for the testing.

+ more awesome articles by Evolving Web

TheodorosPloumis blog: Change the default language of a Drupal 8.x website

Main Drupal Feed - Mon, 11/26/2018 - 16:48

Some weeks before I had to overcame an interesting task. A media webportal in Drupal 8.x with more than 4k articles decided to change the site default language from englush to greek (mainly for SEO reasons but this doesn't matter).

Acquia Developer Center Blog: Drupal Plans to Push the Page-Building Frontier with “Layout Builder”

Main Drupal Feed - Mon, 11/26/2018 - 16:03

If you’ve been reading about new -- and promised -- easy-to-use page builders, you many not be aware that the Drupal community has been working on a super ambitious visual design tool, Layout Builder, that will be included in the next version of Drupal, Drupal 8.7, scheduled to be released this Spring, 2019.

Tags: acquia drupal planet

Ready To Move Flats In Jaipur

Drupal News Org - Mon, 11/26/2018 - 13:32

Planning to book a Ready To Move Flats In Jaipur? Or you're just looking for Ready To Move Flats In Jaipur?, We are all covered. rajesh associates is a leading real estate consultant in Jaipur. A real estate consultant can help you make a great deal while saving your extras. Look no further, contact Rajesh Associates via the Official website.

Dries Buytaert: How Wendy's sells fresh, never-frozen hamburgers online

Main Drupal Feed - Mon, 11/26/2018 - 08:27

During the Innovation Showcase at Acquia Engage, I invited Mike Mancuso, head of digital analytics at Wendy's, on stage. Wendys.com is a Drupal site running on Acquia Cloud, and welcomes 30 million unique visitors a year. Wendy's also uses Acquia Lift to deliver personalized and intelligent experiences to all 30 million visitors.

In the 8-minute video below, Mike explains how Wendy's engages with its customers online.

For the occasion, the team at Wendy's decided to target Acquia Engage attendees. If you visited Wendys.com from Acquia Engage, you got the following personalized banner. It's a nice example of what you can do with Acquia Lift.

As part of my keynote, we also demoed the next generation of Acquia Lift, which will be released in early 2019. In 2018, we decided that user experience always has to come first. We doubled our design and user experience team and changed our product development process to reflect this priority. The upcoming version of Acquia Lift is the first example of that. It offers more than just a fresh UI; it also ships with new features to simplify how marketers create campaigns. If you want a preview, have look at the 9-minute video below!

Jeff Geerling's Blog: Nginx serving up the wrong site content for a Drupal multisite install with https

Main Drupal Feed - Mon, 11/26/2018 - 01:07

I had a 'fun' and puzzling scenario present itself recently as I finished moving more of my Drupal multisite installations over to HTTPS using Let's Encrypt certificates. I've been running this website—along with six other Drupal 7 sites—on an Nginx installation for years. A few of the multisite installs use bare domains, (e.g. jeffgeerling.com instead of www. jeffgeerling.com), and because of that, I have some http redirects on Nginx to make sure people always end up on the canonical domain (e.g. example.com instead of www. example.com).

My Nginx configuration is spread across multiple .conf files, e.g.:

Out & About On The Third Rock: Applying Agile principles and values to transform society

Main Drupal Feed - Sat, 11/24/2018 - 21:18
As Agile practitioners we work to transform complex, environments, could our knowledge, experiences and skills be cross pollinated to transform the very complex! i.e. society? Continue reading →

OpenSense Labs: Significance of Voice Interface for Media and Publishers

Main Drupal Feed - Sat, 11/24/2018 - 06:30
Significance of Voice Interface for Media and Publishers Shankar Sat, 11/24/2018 - 12:00

“Read out the headlines on the front page of today’s edition of The New York Times newspaper”. Say something like this to Google Home or Amazon Echo and you will get to listen to a voice reading out the news. Forget swiping, scrolling and typing, just talk to a voice assistant and hear what you want. Voice interfaces are all the rage in recent times.


Not only is it helpful for your personal use, but organisations from different industries can find it meritorious. When it comes to new publishing opportunities, voice interfaces are right up there alongside artificial intelligence, augmented reality and blockchain. This world is not a part of a fairy tale and voice interface do pose a few challenges. Before we see how publishing companies make a great use of voice assistants, let’s explore voice interfaces a bit.

What exactly are voice interfaces?

Voice user interfaces (VUIs) enable the user to communicate with a system through voice or speech commands. Amazon Alexa, Echo dot, Google Home, Google Mini, Siri, Cortana and the Google Assistant some of the great examples of VUI.  The primary advantage of a VUI is that it enables you to interact with a product hands-free, eyes-free.

The primary advantage of a VUI is that it enables you to interact with a product hands-free, eyes-free.

Applying the same design guidelines to VUIs as to Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) is impossible. There are no visual affordances in a VUI. That means when you are looking at a GUI, you have no apparent indications of what the interface can do or what are the options available. When designing VUI actions, it is of paramount significance that the system clearly lays down possible interaction options, lets the user know what functionality is he/she is using and limit the amount of information to an amount that the user can remember.

Now, why are they important? It’s growing at an alarming pace and Gartner, a research firm, says that it is a trend, no discussion. You can see ‘Virtual Assistant’ in the graphical representation of emerging technologies below.

Source: Gartner

VUI is getting better and better. In just an year, the betterment is apparently visible. Whether it is Google Home or Siri, advancements are impeccable as can be seen in the following graph.

Things that publishers need to know

There is a land grab to own skills and in the arena of VUI, skills can be split into two categories.

First is the branded skills that are connected to your brand and could not be owned by any other organisation. Skills like TED’s ‘play the latest TED Talk’ action and the Wall Street Journal’s ‘What’s News?’ come into this category.

Another category is the one that encompasses more generic skills like “Alexa, give me the headlines on sports” or “Okay Google, give me the stock market news”. Ownership of such generic skills would give you the sole authority over all the categories from the creation of first-mover advantage in the market as brands race to the capturing skills before they are gone.

This can make things tougher for brands who are looking to extract market-specific skills in both the generic and branded categories. And like most things, it is all about finding the right target.

Consumer Intelligence Research Partners stated in a study that Amazon Echo customer spend 66% more than average Amazon customers. This goes to say that Amazon can now afford to sell Echo devices at a lesser price than originally planned. They can even occasionally take a loss on devices for gaining a greater share of consumer spending. The inference that we get from this for the publishers is that optimising for voice search could result in a revenue boost.

Benefits of voice assistants for publishers Emphasising on Customer Experience

Fabrice Rousseau, Amazon’s general manager of Alexa skills, emphasised on reinventing customer experience with the help of voice technology in his keynote address at the CMO Digital Insight Summit. He said, “When we moved from desktop to mobile we didn’t bring the desktop experience to mobile, we invented a very specific mobile experience”. He further stated, “When you move from mobile to voice don’t bring your mobile experience. Just invent an experience that is unique to voice.”

One of the greatest examples of the importance of customer experience through voice technology can be seen through Amazon Audible. If you are a fan of audiobooks, the odds are that Amazon is your preferred place to shop. Of all the ways Amazon has been able to prove its hegemony in the book market, its share of audiobook sales probably represents its most formidable dominance.

Branding with skills

It is of utmost importance to note that, as far as most of the publishers are concerned, although the VUIs have been storming the market, there’s still plenitude of advancements in the pipeline. In spite of early triumphs with branded skills and flash briefings, VUIs still operate at a fairly low level such as following the commands to play music or read out your appointment dates. With that being said, many publishers are already working on plans for expansion. With the land grab to own skills still underway, the ones who make the first move will taste the success in the future.

What are the major challenges? Dearth of personality

Voice assistants’ dearth of personality is one of the foremost concerns of publishers. Chris Gathercole, the head of FTLabs at the Financial Times, and his team used Amazon Polly for converting existing text articles into audio that is then delivered by ‘Artificial Amy’. What they observed was that ‘Amy’ was quick to learn and was also cost-effective but her lack of human-like characteristics was irksome and killed the humour or nuance of a piece.

Banal and disturbing

Automated voices are often either of banal nature or straight up disturbing which can put users off. An amalgamation of artificial and human voices could temper the issue with a voice actor reading parts of the text and a computerised voice contributing further snippets.

Automated voices are often either of banal nature or straight up disturbing Privacy concerns

There are privacy concerns hovering around the ownership of devices that are essentially perpetually eavesdropping on your home. Consumer Watchdog, a customer advocacy group, stated in a study. “These patents show that smart devices target moments in between screen time to monitor sleep habits, listen in on dinner conversations, and track when users shower. Access to this data can flesh out Google and Amazon’s profiles of their users in order to help them more accurately server targeted ads”.

Conclusion

Conversations will evolve into an integral element of digital experiences. Interfaces that enable people to use natural language - from chatbots based on typing and reading to voice interfaces that are based on speaking and listening - are highly popular but also very immature.

However, with more devices without screens being connected, more consumers will look to voice for controlling their efforts and to perform more intricate tasks. Enterprises including publishing companies need guidance from Customer Experience (CX) pros so that their efforts at building conversational interfaces help customers instead of driving them away.

Looking for CX pro? Looking no further than OpenSense Labs as we strongly believe in offering a wonderful digital experience through a suite of services.

Contact us at hello@opensenselabs.com to know more about the benefits of voice interface for a publishing company.

blog banner blog image voice assistant voice interface media and publishing Blog Type Articles Is it a good read ? On

Drupal Atlanta Medium Publication: Drupal Event Organizers 1st Meeting Recap. Next Meeting Jan 8, 2019

Main Drupal Feed - Fri, 11/23/2018 - 20:14
27 Attendees representing 18 Drupal events from around the world.Friday, November 8, 2018 — Drupal Event Organizers 1st Meeting — More people where on the call but some just called in

It’s been almost one month since I wrote the blog post, “DrupalCamp Organizers Unite: Is it Time for Camp Organizers to Become an Official Working Group” and a ton of things have transpired that will catapult us into 2019 with some great momentum. With the support of the many Drupal evangelists, over 50 Drupal event organizers from around the world signed up to attend our first official / unofficial video call.

Then on Friday, November 8, a few hours leading up to the video call, The Drupal Governance Taskforce 2018 Proposal was released. This proposal was put together by the Governance Taskforce in an effort establish a community directive that helps create the next generation of Drupalers. One of the recommendations in this proposal was to provide in-person events, more support, and to establish a Drupal community events working group. The timing of the proposal was perfect for our call. It was really great to see that us organizers were not the only ones who acknowledged that our community events are crucial to Drupal adoption.

Are you a Drupal Event Organizer? Well, join us at our next meeting on Tuesday, January 8, 2019, at 12 pm (EST). Register Here

When the time came to start the call I was a little nervous that not very many people would attend and then all of a sudden the chimes started going off and faces appeared on the screen. After 5 minutes we had 25 people on the call. It was inspirational to be a part of something big. It felt like we were the United Nations :).

Flags of all the Countries that were represented

Countries Represented
Canada, Mumbai, Netherlands, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States.

Drupal Events Represented
BADCamp(2), Drupal Association(2), Drupal North, Drupal Camp Asheville, DrupalCamp Atlanta, Drupal Camp Chattanooga, DrupalCamp Colorado, DrupalCorn(2), Drupaldelphia, Drupal Mountain Camp, Drupal Camp Mumbai, DrupalCamp New Jersey, Florida Drupal Camp (2),Frontend United, GovCon, MidCamp(2), NED Camp(4),Victoria BC Meetup.

Major Points from the November 9th Meeting
  1. The next meeting will be held on Tuesday, January 8, 2019, at 12 pm (EST). Register Here
  2. Comment on Governance Taskforce Proposal Issue
    To help Dries Buytaert, prioritize the recommendation of creating a Community Events Working Group, we need as many people as possible to comment on this issue. Please view the issue and indicate why you believe this working group is critical to the success of Drupal. Comment now!
  3. DrupalCamp Website Starter Kit
    Out of all of the discussions, the common pain point is that the website takes up too much of our limited resources. The idea of an event starter kit, instead of a distribution, was really intriguing to us all. We also discussed all of the events donating funding to hire a professional project manager to scope out what a starter kit would look like.
  4. Drupal.org Events Website
    Many of us use the great Drupical to let us know what events are happening. But if you don’t know about that website there is nowhere on Drupal.org that is easily accessible that promotes Drupal events. The idea that was brought to the table was to design a new section of the community page that is a space specifically for promoting and producing Drupal events.
  5. A Centralized Drupal Event Statistics Hub
    Another website related item that was brought up was the idea of centralized data hub that event organizers could submit crucial data of events (attendance, budget, programing etc.) so that Drupal.org could display the data and allow for data manipulation. For example, it would be great to know how many people attended Drupal events in one year. This data would be extremely powerful as it could help organizers to compare events, drive corporate sponsorships and adoption, and get more people involved with Drupal.
  6. DrupalTV — A website with all Drupal Videos
    The topic around Drupal video content came up and one of the biggest issues was that videos are all over the place and are not organized. To solve this problem, the idea of a centralized website (DrupalTV) where videos were tagged by topic, presenter, module, etc.. would allow for content to be easily found. This idea was started before our meeting and you can see a proof of concept here.

I was very happy to be a part of this first meeting and I hope that Drupal leadership also sees the work we do as critical and will make us an official working group. There were a lot of great conversations that took place so I am sure that I have missed something. Feel free to comment and let me know and I will update the post.

Are you a Drupal Event Organizer? Well, join us at our next meeting on Tuesday, January 8, 2019, at 12 pm (EST). Register Here

You can also join the Drupal Event Organizers Slack community. You can also register for any of our meetings to be added to our emailing list.

Drupal Event Organizers 1st Meeting Recap. Next Meeting Jan 8, 2019 was originally published in Drupal Atlanta on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Medical Theme

Drupal Themes - Fri, 11/23/2018 - 18:40

Medical Theme is a beautiful theme for health and medical purposes, with a modern and catchy design. It comes with a quick and nice great icons, smart content structure, and a clean and simple look.

OpenSense Labs: Accessibility & Healthcare: Drupal is Binding the Two

Main Drupal Feed - Fri, 11/23/2018 - 14:07
Accessibility & Healthcare: Drupal is Binding the Two Vasundhra Fri, 11/23/2018 - 19:37

While constructing a hospital building what is the most important factor which provides safe access to all the people? My whole attention is diverted upon the very first priority of virtual planning, and that is building of ramps. If you ask "why?”, the answer would wind up to one conclusion - Ease of accessibility disabled individuals. 

Imagine if the design of the building can secure modular equality, how important is it to ensure equality through web standards?

According to the World Health Organization, about 15% of the world’s population lives with some form of disability. 

 

With the mere principles of Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0, the web has harmonized the requirements for equal web access.

Accessibility summarizes to be even more vital if you are a part of the healthcare industry. Serving the patients and employees via web accessibility becomes the duty of the healthcare organizations.

The Role Of Web Accessibility In Healthcare

Patients with disabilities are entitled to receive quality healthcare the way others do, and hospitals may be unintentionally shutting their doors for the audience with disabilities by not implementing accessibility on their websites. 

Healthcare activities like booking appointments, checking reports, paying bills, searching for physicians and other medical roles have rapidly moved online. While online operations have resulted in patients convenience and avoided them with the hustle of extended queues, what kind of treatment are disabled people imparted with? 


A patient who is visually impaired visits your healthcare website to look for better treatment options but fails to decipher what’s on the page, and then immediately leaves the website. 

An example of failed engagement, this was a frustrating experience for her. Similarly, patients with disability and limited dexterity also need assistive technology to mesh with any website. 

Assistive technologies like screen readers help the visually impaired individual read text and data on the screen. 

Hence the need for quality healthcare website is a must in situations like these. Healthcare websites should be smartly designed for the common good of every individual.

Because:

  1. Web accessibility provides everyone with equal standards. Every person regardless of their physical ability is able to access information.
     
  2. It comes hand in hand with the features ensuring universal usability of information making abbreviations and unfamiliar medical terminology easy to define.  
     
  3. It ensures that people with visual disability can understand motion or static media with alt text that can be read out loud by screen readers and people with hearing disability are assisted with caption in videos. 
     
  4. Not limited to visuals and audio, web accessibility also ensures that people who have motor control restrictions, disabled arms, can use the website without a computer mouse or other pointing devices like touchpad or touchscreen.

It is important to synchronize it with the visual content to contextualize them.

Web Accessibility for healthcare organizations is not only an option but a major requirement. Why Web Accessibility is a Major Requirement?

Section 508 of Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0, Level AA states that all the websites (majorly the healthcare organizations) need to provide equal standards to all the individuals. If the healthcare providers fail to meet the accessibility guidelines, as demanded by ADA, they become open to legal actions.    

According to the guidelines:

The accessibility standards of the website should aim to meet the AA standards. The standards are organized under four principles: perceivable, operable, understandable and robust.

  1. It should list the accessibility features of the website which includes, alt text, skip links and ARIA attributes.
  2. Ensures that the page can be used without a mouse (with the help of keyboard)
  3. Ensures sufficient color contrast for the text. 
  4. It should involve the advice of the common tasks such as increasing text size and viewing PDF files.
  5. It should grant with the contact information if the user has difficulty accessing parts of the website. 
  Can I get away without implementing these accessibility standards?

If the question “can I get away without implementing accessibility standards” is knocking your head right now then, you must read what happened to Tenet Healthcare in 2016. 

In 2016, Tenet Healthcare, (which operates several Florida hospital) was named under class action complaint on the behalf of visually impaired individuals. The complaint alleged that the hospital’s website was not accessible to blind individuals with screen reader technology, and violated the rule of ADA title III. Thus imposing legal actions against them, with the addition of a huge penalty. 

According to ADA Title III, 4965 federal cases were filed in starting six months of 2018. If the filing continued at the same rate there would be close to 10,000 cases at the end of the year. (30% increase over 2017) 

 

Over the past several years, healthcare industries have increasingly become the target of government plaintiffs, complaining about disability discrimination. If you think you can get away with it then think again.

Not complying with web accessibility in healthcare can not only mean that you will suffer lawsuits but will be penalized and public shaming might turn into financial losses soon. 

How does Healthcare Organizations Ensure Web Accessibility?

Apart from serving the guidelines of ADA title III, the evolution of technology has fundamentally altered and powered the healthcare industries. For sustaining the health and the fitness of the people, innovation plays a crucial role in medical science. This is how it contributes to the healthcare industry.

  1. Screen enlargement and screen reading software 

    Screen enlargement software allows the magnification of the computer screen so that the screen can easily be read, and allows the audience to see whatever is there on the screen. For those who have a poor eyesight, talking software is available that can read the text on the page. In short screen readers. Screen reading software like JAWS, NVDA, talk button etc helps the user attain this task.
     
  2. Text-to-speech

    Text-to-speech has helped the patients understand the digital content by providing a simpler audio version. This is potentially helpful for those who might have literacy issues, a neurodevelopmental disorder, low vision, elderly population, and anyone else searching for a simpler way to access the digital content on the go. 

    Text to speech loudly reads the important medical information to the patients which might include descriptions of the diseases, medical prescriptions, and drug data leaflets. This type of information needs to be well understood to avoid any type of misuse. Thus, by providing this option to the patients, the digital revolution in healthcare marks equal standards for the diverse audience out there.
     
  3. Medication Tools

    People with disability have several medications to follow, and missed doses might end up in an exacerbation of the medical circumstances. In severe cases, it can even lead to a series of consequences that result in hospitalization.

    The patients who are visually impaired or suffering from other reading disorders can easily use these medication tools. These tools help the patients remember the accurate time for their medication by altering them with their medicine. Not only this, but these tools also keep an adequate check of their heart rate and reminds them about their scheduled appointments. There are products that help the audience with this task, products like AdhereTech, Amiko.IO, MyUBox, MedMinder and Vitality GlowCaps.
How Is Drupal the Best Option For Healthcare Websites?

If the healthcare organizations are looking for a platform which is cost-effective when it comes to growing need of the healthcare system for the patients, Drupal tends to shine in that part. 

There is no doubt that Drupal powered healthcare technologies bestow a better living.  It is not only simple to use and work upon but it also makes it easier for healthcare organizations to handle data and documentation. 

The major role which Drupal plays in all these healthcare websites is providing them with quality accessibility for the diverse audience. How? Well, here are some of the changes which Drupal 8 made around accessibility to ensure that your website starts with a strong foundation`

  • Automatic Alternative Text

    Automatic Alternative Text generates descriptive information of an image.  To help the visually impaired individuals understand the all sort of medical images alt text is used. 

    Screen Readers and other text read software read these images or pages out loud with the help of automatic alternative text.

    The module helps in generating an adequate description of an image or a webpage in a human-readable language with complete sentences. The description is based on a collection of content tags and description provided by the editor. 
     
  • WAI-ARIA

    Another W3 published set of standards, WAI-ARIA deals with making certain content type available for the users. Drag and Drop functionality is a great example of this. Drupal 8 follows all the guidelines of WAI-ARIA to make users more understandable to the assistive technologies.
     
  • Aural Alerts

    Users with visual impairment cannot see visual updates on the page such as color changes, animations or texts appended to the content. In this case, Drupal presents a JavaScript method Drupal.announce() which constructs an “aria-live” element on the page. Drupal.announce accepts a string to be read by an audio UA. 
     
  • Block ARIA Landmark Role

    Block ARIA Landmark Roles module is used to provide programmatic access to a certain section of pages, in other words, they provide an easy way for users using assistive technology to skip over blocks of content that are repeated on multiple pages and notify them of the programmatic structure of the page. 

    The module adds to the additional elements of the configuration form that permits the user to assign ARIA landmarks (which can be used to navigate from section to section). All the attributes are added to the elements on the page to define the areas like the main content or maybe the navigation region.

    A visually impaired person can easily find a navigation menu with the help of this module and simply jump to the navigation landmark. Landmarks also help people with disability by providing them with keyboard only navigation to a certain section of pages
     
  • CKEditor Abbreviation

    CKEditor Abbreviation modules help to add a button to CKEditor for inserting and editing abbreviations. If any type of abbreviation tags is selected, the context menu would also contain a link to edit the abbreviations.
     
  • CKEditor Accessibility Checker

    CKEditor Accessibility Checker module is an innovative solution that allows you to inspect the accessibility level of the content created on CKEditor, and immediately solves any issue that is found. 
Conclusion

Healthcare technologies are evolving at a very rapid pace, and meeting the accessibility standards also reap the benefit from the technical standpoint. Every organization is committed and focused on serving its patients whether it is a healthcare organization or a website development organization, the audience is the very first key to every accessibility standards. Drupal has been contributing to each one, granting user and digital experience in every sector. 

At OpenSense Labs the objective of such apprehensions has always been the number one priority. Contact us at hello@opensenselabs.com to build an accessibility solution by integration Drupal with healthcare technologies.

blog banner blog image Drupal Drupal 8 Alternative text Web Accessibility Drupal accessibility Screen readers CKEditor Accessibility Checker Block ARIA Landmark Roles WAI-ARIA Blog Type Articles Is it a good read ? On

OpenSense Labs: A Beginner’s Guide to a Medical Device CMS

Main Drupal Feed - Fri, 11/23/2018 - 10:04
A Beginner’s Guide to a Medical Device CMS Akshita Fri, 11/23/2018 - 15:34

Medical devices save countless lives each year and can dramatically improve the quality of life of millions of people. However, the development and manufacturing of advanced medical devices is a complex, time-consuming and investment-intensive process. 

In a bid to scale up their services, life sciences and healthcare service providers need well-curated technology to market their products and services. 


More than the device, the technology used in the backend to curate the information and compile it is important than ever. 

Here’s a beginner's guide to the medical device CMS. 

What is a Medical Device CMS?

Healthcare professionals who are responsible for technology management require a balanced and effective content management system with possible medical device integration.

A medical device CMS is the one that provides an easy integration matrix between a medical device (hardware) and a data management system (software). 
 
The main purpose of it is to provide a better monitoring of the data collected by the hardware devices while storing it for the future. 

Some of the best examples of medical devices would include insulin monitor, fitness tracker bands, heart rate monitoring devices - to detect stroke, sleep tracking devices, among others.

A medical device CMS balances the hardware-software relationship  

An ideal medical device CMS address the following: 

  1. Ability to store and forward the acquired data from a hardware device
  2. Manage and format the data in the required standards

Here's how Drupal is faring in the Healthcare technology trends

From Pulse to the Report

The dramatic increase in smartphone usage and portable devices have triggered the emergence of stand-alone health and medical devices and software apps. 

Wearable sensor-devices play a critical role in monitoring the health of a person. These devices can record real-time information about one's physiological condition and motion activities. 

These devices can be identified on the basis of their sensors and accordingly fall in the predefined categories. They are capable of measuring physiological signs such as heart rate, body temperature, blood pressure, respiration rate, electromyogram, electrodermal activity, and in most cases even insulin. 

Wearable sensor-devices play a critical role in monitoring the health of a person. 

Micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) based miniature motion sensors are used to measure activity related to signals from the body movement. 

The measured and processed data is then transmitted to the remote healthcare facility (or to the smartphones) over the internet. Security, here, is the major concern since a secured communication channel would safeguard the privacy of (sensitive) personal medical data of an individual. 


Tips for Medical Device Developers and Organizations

When planning to build a healthcare device, it is important to choose a CMS that gives an accurate representation of data and disseminates the data (in different forms of content) to different platform while adapting to the various screens and sizes too. 

The CMS must provide the following features:

  1. Security: Under the HIPAA Privacy rules, healthcare services providers must ensure automatic log off, encryption and decryption of data, tracking logs that record activity on hardware and software. 

    The technology at the backend must ensure that the health data can be accessed by limited people and secured under definitive measures. SSL certificate is one of the implementations. 
     
  2. Remote Access: The information procured from the medical device should be easily accessible to the individual and healthcare provider, who can then monitor the changes. Easy tracking of data is on screen with various elements present while providing the necessary training material in itself.  
     
  3. User-friendly: Usability is an important aspect of medical device designing. A balance between aesthetics and usability is important for small devices like track bands. Use of flat design, icons, enabling scrolling, 3D look, small text to reduce visual density can give a cleaner look with a minimalistic look. 
     
  4. Responsive presentation of the data: While medical devices can be of different shapes and screen sizes, the CMS must ensure that the content is presentable in various mobile devices to keep the user interface intact. The flow (dissemination) of content must be consistent flowing on to the screens regardless of the device. 
Exploring the Medical Device CMS. Here’s What Healthcare Professionals Need. 

As against the common misapprehension, a CMS is responsible not just for the written content but for every piece of information that can be used to create and manage digital documents. 

In the above section, the process of the gathering information has been discussed in details and it should come as no surprise how important a CMS is in the process.

Not any CMS can be the choice for a medical device. This list will help you filter out the features of a CMS required from an ideal choice. 

  • An Effective Document and Content Management

Establishing a system for mapping and managing the documentation of various users and their records can be a heftier task.  

When selecting a CMS for medical devices, healthcare organizations recognize the need to have easy document management solutions. 

The CMS must ease the process of generating and maintaining records resulting from the micro-electro-mechanical system while presenting them in different types as per the requirement. As the service provider, it should be able to track, manage, and store information and documents related to the patient’s health.

A medical device CMS needs to be an effective document management system.

Supporting a wide variety of document types, an effective solution would seamlessly integrate all procured health information (scanned charts and data, clinical paperwork, referrals, and more) into the patient’s profile.

Additionally it should provide enough storage to hold all the patients’ data without letting your application or website bend or break. 

Before narrowing down to one, ensure that the CMS supports the following content types:

  1. Text documents
  2. Graphics
  3. Web pages
  4. All image types
  5. Reports
  6. Multimedia
  • Multiple Device Support

Assuming that the user must be using one particular device type would mean a major blunder on the user interface. When developing a sophisticated web application compatible with different devices, it is important to ensure the CMS provides provision to elements like HTML5 to build a responsive application. 

Adding a rich user experience using various capabilities will ensure various stakeholders (such as physicians and patient) accessing the desired information easily. It should act as a centralised content dissemination platform for serving digital content on screens.

Text format, SMS, e-mail and other alerts on mobile phones can cover the rapidly growing smaller screens generation. 

  • A Secure and Privacy of Data

While electronic methods provide increased efficiency and mobility, HIPAA ensures that appropriate steps are taken by the organization to safeguard the information and maintain the integrity and privacy of ePHI. 

Medical devices share patient information with other technologies which could compromise patients’ privacy and security if hacked. Holding personal information like name, contact information, patient’s medical information, security can’t be compromised when considering a CMS for medical devices. 

Without proper security protocols in place, personal and confidential information could be misused by any person or organization interested in exploiting the data for personal gain.

Under HIPAA, a series of regulatory standards are outlined to ensure the protected health information (PHI) is not disclosed and remain safe under the law.

The CMS must ensure a secure access to the system with data encryption repeatedly happening in the backend. Salting and hashing of the database, strong password policy, session limits, and single sign-on systems are enforced. 

Proper data validation can be done to prevents XSS, CSRF, DDOS, and other malicious data entry.

  • Easy integration with Third-Party Application 

A perfect product doesn’t exist. 

A CMS that would offer you all the features without external support doesn’t exist. Since medical healthcare providing organizations are repeatedly moving towards electronic health records (EHR) to store the medical history and offer a splendid digital experience to the patients. 

An ideal CMS here would provide easy integration and smooth workflow after integration without compromising on the security. 

Working with a lot of devices and data, there are chances of inconsistency and content duplicacy, in order to avoid these issues in real time, a possible synergy needs to be created between the CMS and the third party tools.  CMS compatibility with the third party tools is important. 

 

  • Web Accessibility 

To ensure universal healthcare in today's times, governments penalize healthcare facilities not complying with web accessibility guidelines. 

People with disability face inequality, violation of dignity, and face injustices in walks of life. As their support system, how can the healthcare organizations which are supposed to act as the pillar of support not enforce web accessibility guidelines on their own website?

From the legal perspective, penalties can risk reputational loss, financial loss, or a class-action lawsuit.

Failing to meet the web accessibility standards, healthcare service providers can leave the disabled patients frustrated and discriminated against. 

Everything has shifted online and patients are seeking information online more than they are consulting doctors for real. Web accessibility is more crucial than ever for the healthcare industry as differently abled people jump to receive information online. 

Poor contrast, no resize feature, no aural alerts, no keyboard navigation access can leave many visitors with bitterness and confusion. Therefore, it is important for an ideal CMS to provide web accessibility features at its core. If not user experience then under section 508, organizations are compelled to make all web technologies fully usable by people with various disabilities. 

The role of the CMS doesn’t end with integrating various devices and process, the more complied with the web accessibility law, the better can healthcare service provider serve quality healthcare. Not only do healthcare organization reach out with an improved brand message but consumer experience as well. 

  • A Centralized Content Management System

“A content repository is a database of (digital) content with an associated set of data management, search and access methods allowing various application-independent access to the content with the ability to store and modify content.”

The proliferation of content from a variety of sources can create an enormous challenge. As the unstructured content grows, data loss becomes a hard reality. Healthcare organizations need to look for a flexible approach that supports interoperability with a wide array of popular systems and products. 

A CMS that is robust and can be worked as a central content management repository storing a variety of content formats, facilitating read/write capabilities, control access. Information shared through one platform (say a fitband) to be updated in real-time across all the connected systems (EHR System).

As a content repository, it must provide efficient storage to integrate content, easy versioning, import/ export of content, content manager accessibility for all the documents and the content, records retention management system providing the capability of document-imaging.

  • Community-based CMS

Communities help you evolve. Promoting direct communication between service provider and end user, communities can actually boost the product development cycle. Handling a diverse set of stakeholders as a means of increasing quality management and regulatory compliance while reducing risk, the provision of building communities can ease one thing for marketers.

Covering general FAQs, or major technical problems, communities provide the user with a platform to connect with. 

Software as a Medical Device

In an August 2016, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released a draft guidance document which details it as one of the fastest growing trends in medical devices: Software as a Medical Device, or SaMD.

With “one week workout” and “six-minute cardio” going crazy for the now health conscious millennials medical devices are a big success. To ensure the safety of these devices and the people using them, they need to pass the quality check by the FDA. 

Software as a Medical device is a software intended to be used for one or more medical purposes that perform the objective without being part of a hardware medical device, 2014, IMDRF report.

It is a concept proposed by FDA. Prepared with precise guidelines and regulations, FDA assesses the safety and efficacy of new devices that go to the market.

Software intended to be used for one or more medical purposes that perform the objective without being part of a hardware medical device.

SaMD may interface with other physical devices, but it must run on general computing platforms (or mobile devices), and may be used in combination with other medical devices.

Some examples of SaMD devices are:

  • Software that allows MRI and other types of medical imaging to be viewed on regular mobile devices
  • Software that performs image processing in to detect cancer
  • Treatment planning applications that supply information
  • Software that regulates an installed medical device, like a pacemaker
  • BMI and body fat calculators, and heart rate monitors

An important distinction here is that the software doesn’t meet the definition of SaMD if its intended purpose is to power a hardware medical device. 

Accordingly, the categories for software medical devices distinguish software applications across two key dimensions:

  1. The significance of Information – Devices that are used directly in the treatment or diagnosis of patient illnesses are expected to obtain higher standards of clinical evidence, including obtaining both scientific and analytical validity, as well as assessing clinical performance.
     
  2. State of Disease – When a SaMD is used as an intervention for a critical disease, it must be tested more rigorously than if its intended use is in detecting non-serious illnesses.
Conclusion

Being fit is the new fad. Because of which healthcare-medical devices are increasingly becoming popular. At the same time, the importance of the software behind the curtain cannot be denied.  

With the rapid development in technologies such as wireless, embedded, nanotechnology and so on it has become possible to develop handy systems and devices.

At OpenSense Labs, we understand that with technology advancing, healthcare software needs to be an all-rounder. They need to be secure, robust and easy to integrate with other technologies and platforms. 

Drop a mail at hello@opensenselabs.com or give a shout out on Twitter @OpenSenseLabs to talk about possible synergies. 

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OpenSense Labs: Integrating Document Management System with Drupal

Main Drupal Feed - Fri, 11/23/2018 - 09:42
Integrating Document Management System with Drupal Shankar Fri, 11/23/2018 - 15:12

There is a moment of realisation when we see how much we have actually evolved while reading a novel where the story takes us into the 20th century. When we see characters in that novel, who go to the office and have to keep an account of all the company documents that just keeps mounting up, we sense the burned-out feeling of all those office-goers. And then there is this internet era where all the documents are digitally managed, searched, shared and archived. Such is the effect of digitisation that something like a Document Management System helps an organisation to go paperless and govern complex files in an organised way.


Instead of searching for files and consuming a lot of time and effort, the Document Management System (DMS) is a one-stop destination for streamlining business workflow and improving team collaboration in the process. It helps in letting go of papers and having a positive change in the environment. Drupal, as one of the leading open source content management framework, has the provision for handling document management with a suite of modules. Let’s look at what DMS is exactly before we plunge into Drupal’s efficacy.

What is a Document Management System?

Document management system refers to the system that is developed specifically for authoring and governing electronic documents. Creating, sharing, organising, and archiving the documents are managed by DMS. It simplifies these processes for enhancing productivity while managing the documents digitally. Its central electronic location streamlines the process of finding documents, saves your time in the process, and helps you manage more of your organisation’s core operations.

Document management system refers to the system that is developed specifically for authoring and governing electronic documents.

DMS is quintessential. A compilation of statistics by Business.com delineates that document management is right up there and is very essential for efficacious business workflow. In a survey, IDC stated that 21.3% of productivity is lost because of convolutions in handling the document. Another report by M-Files states that poor document storage amounts to 50% of the loss of time due to difficulty while searching. Harris interactive says in a study that 83% of knowledge workers lose time in versioning and e-signatures reduce timearound times by 80% according to Ombud Inc.

Categories of Document Management System

The two common types of DMS include cloud-based and self-hosted.

Cloud-based DMS

In this case, the software is hosted by your provider which is accessible online. As long as you are connected to the internet, it is possible logging into the system. You won’t require an IT team for installation to keep it running properly. You can tap into the system from anywhere and anytime while files are automatically saved in the cloud thereby reducing the need for regular backups.

Self-hosted DMS

Unlike Cloud-based DMS, it is stored on your company’s servers. It is possible to store as many files as your server allows. The challenge lies in regularly backing up files manually. It is great for users who value being in control of their own system and do not have to rely on others to keep it running.

Features of Document Management System
  • Storage: DMS lets you archive your files in a single location so that they can be retrieved, stored and shared easily for future use.
  • Security: DMS helps you in avoiding unauthorised access by implementing role-based permissions for file entry. Some systems also restrict IP addresses.
  • Version control: You do not have to handle numerous copies of a single document thereby staying in control of your document’s versions. You can see all the versions made and sends alerts to all the members about the most up-to-date version.
  • Indexing: You can index files systematically for a swift, simple retrieval later on given its file key.
  • Uploading: You can upload documents in bulk efficiently.
  • Editing: It is easier to apply adjustments and modifications to a PDF file.
  • Branding: It is possible to define your organisation’s branding by setting up its colour, theme and logo to convey your brand’s look and feel.
  • On-the-go: You can access your files using mobile devices. This helps in easily capturing images of documents and uploading them swiftly.
  • Synchronising files: Online files with the copies of documents stored in your system can be synced which helps in updating the team members with the latest documents.
  • Audit trail: Referring to a document’s path in its lifecycle, audit trail feature of DMS helps in fetching detailed reports on the path that the file has followed.
Merits of a Document Management System
  • Centralisation: DMS lets you organise your file easily using tags and labels thereby centralising the document management.
  • Team collaboration: DMS allows team members to view and edit a document at the same time.
  • Data security: Many Document Management Systems implement a role-based access control for permitting entry only to specific users to the document.
  • File retrieval: Simple by using a keyword or keyphrase, you can look for a specific file. You can also use a document remotely.
  • Regulatory compliance: DMS leverages features like audit trails, security and backups to ensure regulatory compliance like the 21 CFR Part 11 and Annex 11.
  • Carbon footprint: Choosing DMS ensures that you are reducing carbon footprint by going paperless.
Examples of Document Management System

Alfresco, an open source Enterprise Content Management (ECM), offers document management, collaboration, knowledge and web content management, record and image management, content repository and workflow.

Seed DMS, an open source DMS, is user-friendly. It serves as a fully developed enterprise-ready platform for tracing, accessing, storing and sharing documents.

M-Files is another useful and easy-to-implement DMS. It helps in governing your information securely with its Check-out feature.

LogicalDOC is an open-source Java-based system which improves productivity and collaboration of document management system.

Ademero supports centralised control mechanism for storing documents at a single vault and allows scanned documents to be converted into PDFs using Optical Character Recognition feature.

How can Drupal be integrated with Document Management Systems?

Drupal offers an amazing set of modules and distributions that can help in incorporating the features of DMS.

Vardoc: Knowledge base system and documentation site

Vardoc, which is a knowledge base system, a wiki system and a DMS, is Drupal distribution built for hosting an enormous amount of content in a structured and easy to find format. It lets you develop a connected organisation, product or knowledge area.

This is built on top of Varbase, which is an open source Drupal 8 distribution, and offers some useful functionalities like editorial features, search function, taxonomy, user management and customisable themes.

Moreover, it delivers top-of-the-line non-functional requirements like enterprise security, high performance, Search Engine Optimisation (SEO), accessibility compliance and so on.

Document Module

Document module provides complete integration with Drupal node system and acts as a DMS for Drupal. This module adds a custom node type - document. Every document that you will create will be a Drupal node and therefore will reap the benefits available to a node.

It has the support for document revisions/versioning. The custom fields added by the module to the Document node type are accessible in Views. It also has the support for theming.

Moreover, the documents, being nodes, are entirely indexable by the Drupal search system. This module also provides its own custom search for documents. This module is available only for Drupal 7 version.

CMIS API

CMIS API is a suite of modules primarily offering an API for connecting to Content Management Interoperability Services (CMIS) compliant systems to bi-directionally syncing content between the CMIS ECM system and Drupal.

It also comes with features like creating, updating, browsing and searching content in the CMIS ECM system through the Drupal interface.

The objective of CMIS API is to offer an easy-to-use, web content management front-end in Drupal for ECM systems that are, most often than not, unfamiliar to web content managers.

Filedepot

Filedepot module gives you a Google Docs like feel. It is an integrated file management module that supports role and user-based security. You can save the documents outside the Drupal public directory for safe access.

Files of all type can be stored in filedepot and its flexible permission model lets you delegate folder administration to other users.

You can simply drag and drop files from local desktop and upload them in bulk. Also, users can receive notification of new files being added or altered. You can flag the document as ‘locked’ in order to alert users that it is being updated. This module is available only for Drupal 7 version.

Alfresco Module

Alfresco module provides integration between Drupal and Alfresco Enterprise CMS. It helps you in developing Drupal sites using the Alfresco’s document management repository for storing and sharing documents.

It governs Alfresco content items as Drupal nodes with the help of custom content type (Alfresco item). It also offers a Content Construction Kit (CCK) field type for Alfresco content items.

Bundled with AJAX-based repository browser, it lets you visualise, upload, search and retrieve nodes from the Alfresco repository. Please note that this module is not covered by Drupal’s security advisory policy.

Web File Manager

WebFM module is based on a hierarchical directory structure and leverages AJAX for letting the administrators arrange files on the server in a similar way as done with file managers on the personal systems. This improves the manageability of huge collections of documents.

It lets you define permissions by role and file user ID. You can also attach files to numerous nodes and/or comments. This module is not covered by Drupal’s security advisory policy.

Conclusion

Document Management Systems are essential for product documentation sites, agencies who want to document software, documentation for open source products/projects, organisations who want to document their process and online user manuals. Integrating DMS with Drupal is a praiseworthy option as you get the best of Drupal’s robust content management functionalities and the power of specialised DMS.

Drupal experts at OpenSense Labs are committed to delivering an incredible digital experience with its suite of services.

Contact us at hello@opensenselabs.com to leverage the power of Drupal and the DMS.

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