Drupal News

Tag1 Consulting: Git basics keep you on track

Main Drupal Feed - Mon, 09/21/2020 - 12:07

In his Drupal4Gov webinar Using tools and Git workflow best practices to simplify your local development, Greg Lund-Chaix, Senior Infrastructure Engineer at Tag1, talks about some of the ways that teams struggle when they become successful and need to learn to scale. He recommends using some basic tools to make your workflow easier. The right tools in your environment can prevent big problems down the line with merge conflicts, code committed to the wrong branch, or other mistakes.

Read more lynette@tag1co… Mon, 09/21/2020 - 05:07

Digital Echidna: Thoughts on all things digital: Smart Date 3.0 - the Intelligent Choice for Better Integration, Better Admin Experience

Main Drupal Feed - Mon, 09/21/2020 - 09:09
This week brought a new, stable release for Smart Date 3.0.0. You're welcome to dig through the various Smart Date release notes to read up on all the changes from the previous, 8.x-2.x branch but I thought I would use this space to talk about some…

Digital Echidna: Thoughts on all things digital: Smart Date 3.0 - the Intelligent Choice for Better Integration, Better Admin Experience

Main Drupal Feed - Mon, 09/21/2020 - 09:09
This week brought a new, stable release for Smart Date 3.0.0. You're welcome to dig through the various Smart Date release notes to read up on all the changes from the previous, 8.x-2.x branch but I thought I would use this space to talk about some…

druparcheky_theme

Drupal Themes - Sun, 09/20/2020 - 21:37

composer require drupal/druparcheky_theme
or
composer require carcheky/druparcheky_theme

Palantir: Thoughts and Reflections on Drupal Association Governance

Main Drupal Feed - Sun, 09/20/2020 - 12:00

How organizational cruft creates confusion for the contributor community and what might be done to address it.

I am no longer a Drupal Association board member nor was I involved in or privy to the discussions around the changes that the Drupal Association Board made to voting eligibility made this spring.  I’ve been reflecting on what I’ve heard from all sides and find that I may have some context that might prove helpful in understanding how we got here and some ideas on moving forward. Ultimately, the vestigial linguistic mapping that we used to ease the transition from Drupal VZW to DrupalCon, Inc. may instead be creating tension and misaligned expectations. The more the DA can clarify and create aligned expectations between itself and its contributors the stronger the Drupal’s future can be.

Drupal VZW - The Original Drupal Association

The Drupal Association has actually been two separate legal entities during its short lifespan. The current US-based 501(c)3 organization, DrupalCon, Inc. (DCI) that does business as (DBA) the Drupal Association is the successor organization to Drupal VZW, a Belgian organization originally founded in 2006. 

Drupal VZW was structured as an “association with non-profit purpose” (Vereniging zonder winstoogmerk in Dutch, abbreviated VZW or in French, Association sans but lucratif, or ABSL). A VZW has a defined structure which may be unfamiliar to non-Europeans: an association has a General Assembly (GA) of permanent “members” who nominate new people to become members of the GA at their discretion and then select the board of directors from among that GA membership; the membership rights and obligations are also quite defined and standardized. The original Drupal Association began as a GA of members selected by Dries with other members added annually by nomination of existing members based on their contributions to Drupal. 

While establishing the DA as a VZW initially was the most expedient option, by 2009 when I joined the GA and the board, the structure was under strain. At its peak, Drupal VZW was an international organization with a General Assembly of about four dozen and a board of ~8 people, most of whom did the work of unpaid staff. 

There were many reasons why we decided to deprecate the Belgian organization in 2010 and transfer the primary governance and assets to a US-based 501(c)3. The top three from my perspective were fiscal and tax considerations from the increasingly successful US-based educational conferences (North American DrupalCon), governance challenges with the GA/board structure (quorum was incredibly difficult to obtain to even consider structural changes) and difficulties operating the organization internationally especially during a period of Belgian political instability. Things may have been different had it been structured as an internationale vereniging zonder winstoogmerk (IVZW) from the start, but that is neither here nor there at this point.

The Transition to DrupalCon, Inc.

This context of VZW is important to understand how the bylaws for DrupalCon Inc., the US-based 501(c)3 were drafted. Largely, they are standard non-profit bylaws, but there were some key questions that we considered that informed the ways in which they were different (at least initially):

  1. What might the role be for former General Assembly permanent members?

    In VZW, the GA served as the accountability check for the board, which in turn functioned as staff. For example, the VZW board brought the budget to the General Assembly for review and approval once per year in the annual meeting. However, in the US, boards typically have a mix of those involved with the organization as well as outside perspectives that serve as the directors who are legally accountable for the actions of organizations.  

    As a transition, we created opportunities for interested former GA members to retain involvement and oversight. Initially, the bylaws created an Advisory Board committee for former GA members to serve on, but within the first few years, it was defunct through neglect. The board itself was advisory only and didn’t need another advisory board to advise it. In addition, GA members were invited to serve on the permanent committees of the board such as the Nominating Committee. Over time, that too has fallen off. Now the board committees are entirely composed of board members, which is typical of US-based non-profits.

    Many former GA members have moved on from the project; some remain involved in leadership roles: George DeMet is the chair of the Community Working Group. Neill Drumm is a Senior Technologist at the Drupal Association, and  Angie Byron is a Drupal Product Manager. Others remain contributors at various levels. None, aside from Dries, is currently serving on the Board.
  2. As we professionalized the board (e.g., became a strategic board that supported staff rather than a board of hands-on doers or managers or staff), how might we ensure a continued voice for hands-on contributors in the community?

    The strength of the Drupal community has always been in and derived from its contributor base. There was a lot of anxiety and care in our bylaw drafting process given to how we could preserve that connection and culture on the board even as we knew we would need to adapt the composition of the board to suit the needs of a strategic board. This is where the concept of the At-Large Director came in.

    The idea was that having two At-Large Directors would guarantee that at a minimum there would always be at least two representatives of the contributor community on the board to give voice, connection and insight to Drupal’s core strength. That, combined with Dries’s permanent seat as founder, created the three-person backbone of the organization that offsets the three rotating classes of self-selected Director slates, more typical of professional not-for-profit boards.

    The shorter term length was to keep this voice fresh and increase the accountability to the contributor community through frequent opportunity for the community to weigh in. After a few years it became clear that the one-year term was too short. It truly does take a year to get your bearings on any board. To enable an At-Large Director to make a meaningful contribution to the board, a two-year term was necessary and the director openings were staggered to keep elections annual.
  3. How to map the European structures and concepts to a US-based 501(c)3?

    Despite all the hours spent redesigning the organization, its structure, and its bylaws, there was never any consideration given to changing the name “The Drupal Association.” The US-based entity DrupalCon, Inc. (DCI) that had been created for DrupalCon DC as a Co-op was converted into the 501(c)3 and all of the assets from Drupal VZW were transferred to it. “The Drupal Association” was overlaid as a DBA (doing business as) due to the equity in the name and to minimize confusion. 

    For the US organization, the General Assembly (GA)’s oversight responsibilities (budget oversight, statutes, legal status, adding/removing members, etc.) moved to the Board of Directors with operational responsibilities transitioned to staff. We recognized that the elimination of the GA and the shift to a strategic board with a professional staff represented a necessary maturation of the organization and also had the potential to impact our culture unless deliberately preserved. Looking for opportunities for broader and more inclusive participation and to ensure that the voices of contributors remained strong, we created the At-Large Directors “elected by the community and ratified by the rest of the Board.”
The Challenge and Impact of Not Defining “Community”

The bylaws are silent on the definition of “community” even though it bestows a pretty important right to it. That lack of clarity has been the root cause of frustrations for both the community and the DA staff over the years and, it seems to me, underlies these current concerns. Without a clear alignment, it has been difficult to establish mutual expectations, to know what to expect and what might be expected in return.

This ambiguity becomes especially confusing in an organization that refers to itself an “Association.” The name itself implies there would be (or should be) members. In an association, the most common right bestowed upon a member of the association is voting eligibility.

Because “community” is not defined it falls to the Board to define. For expediency prior to those first At-Large elections, the DA used logging into Drupal.org in the year prior to the opening of the election to define the “community” as it was easy to quantify and provided some safeguards against fraud. While I recall discussing it as a board, the discussion was about technical feasibility rather than strategic value or engagement. I recall it as a case of measuring what was easy/feasible. We knew it was ridiculously overbroad, but it had worked well enough and better to be more inclusive than less. I don’t recall discussing or validating a definition of “community” with respect to election eligibility again during my tenure, which ended in December 2017.

The problem with this definition is that it sets the bar too low. It is not unreasonable that an organization ask that those who vote in its election be restricted to those who engage with and contribute to the organization. Failure to revisit this definition earlier has ossified an expedient definition into an expectant right. To change a privilege that had been in place that long (albeit one that was very underused) needed more communication with those impacted than was provided.

I fully support the Board in revisiting this neglected portion of its governance process. However, restricting voting eligibility to those with purchased memberships (while again expedient/easy) seems a flawed approach as it both perpetuates the “association” confusion and is overly restrictive. The DA bylaws explicitly state: “DrupalCon, Inc. (the "Corporation") is a Washington, D.C., nonprofit, public benefit corporation, and it has no members.” The fact that the DA offers individual “memberships” and is now extending voting rights only to those with membership is confusing. To be clear, these individual recurring donations are an essential form of support for the organization (as with any non-profit), but they do not constitute memberships of the non-profit corporation in a traditional association sense. Further, financial donations are not the only support upon which the DA relies. To bestow voting rights in exchange for primarily financial considerations (absent individual appeals) feels restrictive and like an alarming usurpation especially for an open source community.

What now?

Over the last ten years, the DA has gradually evolved and matured. The unique characteristics designed to ease the transition from VZW to DCI have increasingly been deprecated or brought into alignment with standard practice for a US-based 501(c)3. The changes have been gradual; to those actively involved in the DA, they might feel like a steady natural progression or for those who are newer to the organization, might feel completely non-controversial. It’s important to keep in mind that the 2019-2020 Drupal Association Board marked the first time when no former member of the Drupal VZW General Assembly (aside from Dries) served on the DA (DCI) Board. 

It seems to me that it is time to further evolve and here are my unsolicited recommendations:

  1. Clarify what the DA is: drop the legacy language inherited from our VZW days that is confusing and distracting. 
    • The organization is not an “Association”. It is a Foundation. Consider renaming it.
    • There are no “members”. There never have been. There are and always have been “contributors”. Discontinue calling financial supporters “members”. Orient services and benefits provided for contributors, both individual and organizational, comprehensively recognizing all forms of contribution.
    • Update the wording around the At-Large Director: “elected by the Contributors to the DA and ratified by the Board of Directors.”
  2. Clarify what the DA does: it is the clearinghouse for resources that support Drupal and its contributors. While the DA (and Drupal project itself) may provide benefit to those who are not contributors, the sustainability of the organization depends on optimizing benefit for those who are contributors.

    Adopting this lens provides the opportunity to clarify the ambiguous “community” in the bylaws with a much more objective definition of “contributors” particularly following implementation of the forthcoming recommendations from the Contribution Committee that recognizes all types of contribution (individual and organizational). 
  3. Consider expanding the number of At-Large Directors. As I left the Board, I advocated that the number of At-Large board positions be increased to 4, two elected each year. The switch to two-year terms for each At-Large Director was important. However, an unintended consequence of that change has been that those elected have been less globally representative than the representatives with two people elected at once. In fact, to date, all have been North American, with the exception of the remarkable Shyamala Rajaram from India in 2016 (the year of DrupalCon Asia, which saw increased eligibility and turnout).

    At-Large Directors bring tremendous value and perspective to the board. Ranked voting from a single pool for two positions gives candidates from smaller emergent contributor communities greater statistical odds of success. I encourage the board to consider expanding the number of At-Large Directors for that reason.

My hope is that by addressing some of these legacy semantic issues, the Drupal Association will be able to provide greater clarity, move forward into its next decade and build the kind of strong relationships that allow us all to focus on our shared goals.
 

Community Drupal Open Source

Palantir: Thoughts and Reflections on Drupal Association Governance

Main Drupal Feed - Sun, 09/20/2020 - 12:00

How organizational cruft creates confusion for the contributor community and what might be done to address it.

I am no longer a Drupal Association board member nor was I involved in or privy to the discussions around the changes that the Drupal Association Board made to voting eligibility made this spring.  I’ve been reflecting on what I’ve heard from all sides and find that I may have some context that might prove helpful in understanding how we got here and some ideas on moving forward. Ultimately, the vestigial linguistic mapping that we used to ease the transition from Drupal VZW to DrupalCon, Inc. may instead be creating tension and misaligned expectations. The more the DA can clarify and create aligned expectations between itself and its contributors the stronger the Drupal’s future can be.

Drupal VZW - The Original Drupal Association

The Drupal Association has actually been two separate legal entities during its short lifespan. The current US-based 501(c)3 organization, DrupalCon, Inc. (DCI) that does business as (DBA) the Drupal Association is the successor organization to Drupal VZW, a Belgian organization originally founded in 2006. 

Drupal VZW was structured as an “association with non-profit purpose” (Vereniging zonder winstoogmerk in Dutch, abbreviated VZW or in French, Association sans but lucratif, or ABSL). A VZW has a defined structure which may be unfamiliar to non-Europeans: an association has a General Assembly (GA) of permanent “members” who nominate new people to become members of the GA at their discretion and then select the board of directors from among that GA membership; the membership rights and obligations are also quite defined and standardized. The original Drupal Association began as a GA of members selected by Dries with other members added annually by nomination of existing members based on their contributions to Drupal. 

While establishing the DA as a VZW initially was the most expedient option, by 2009 when I joined the GA and the board, the structure was under strain. At its peak, Drupal VZW was an international organization with a General Assembly of about four dozen and a board of ~8 people, most of whom did the work of unpaid staff. 

There were many reasons why we decided to deprecate the Belgian organization in 2010 and transfer the primary governance and assets to a US-based 501(c)3. The top three from my perspective were fiscal and tax considerations from the increasingly successful US-based educational conferences (North American DrupalCon), governance challenges with the GA/board structure (quorum was incredibly difficult to obtain to even consider structural changes) and difficulties operating the organization internationally especially during a period of Belgian political instability. Things may have been different had it been structured as an internationale vereniging zonder winstoogmerk (IVZW) from the start, but that is neither here nor there at this point.

The Transition to DrupalCon, Inc.

This context of VZW is important to understand how the bylaws for DrupalCon Inc., the US-based 501(c)3 were drafted. Largely, they are standard non-profit bylaws, but there were some key questions that we considered that informed the ways in which they were different (at least initially):

  1. What might the role be for former General Assembly permanent members?

    In VZW, the GA served as the accountability check for the board, which in turn functioned as staff. For example, the VZW board brought the budget to the General Assembly for review and approval once per year in the annual meeting. However, in the US, boards typically have a mix of those involved with the organization as well as outside perspectives that serve as the directors who are legally accountable for the actions of organizations.  

    As a transition, we created opportunities for interested former GA members to retain involvement and oversight. Initially, the bylaws created an Advisory Board committee for former GA members to serve on, but within the first few years, it was defunct through neglect. The board itself was advisory only and didn’t need another advisory board to advise it. In addition, GA members were invited to serve on the permanent committees of the board such as the Nominating Committee. Over time, that too has fallen off. Now the board committees are entirely composed of board members, which is typical of US-based non-profits.

    Many former GA members have moved on from the project; some remain involved in leadership roles: George DeMet is the chair of the Community Working Group. Neill Drumm is a Senior Technologist at the Drupal Association, and  Angie Byron is a Drupal Product Manager. Others remain contributors at various levels. None, aside from Dries, is currently serving on the Board.
  2. As we professionalized the board (e.g., became a strategic board that supported staff rather than a board of hands-on doers or managers or staff), how might we ensure a continued voice for hands-on contributors in the community?

    The strength of the Drupal community has always been in and derived from its contributor base. There was a lot of anxiety and care in our bylaw drafting process given to how we could preserve that connection and culture on the board even as we knew we would need to adapt the composition of the board to suit the needs of a strategic board. This is where the concept of the At-Large Director came in.

    The idea was that having two At-Large Directors would guarantee that at a minimum there would always be at least two representatives of the contributor community on the board to give voice, connection and insight to Drupal’s core strength. That, combined with Dries’s permanent seat as founder, created the three-person backbone of the organization that offsets the three rotating classes of self-selected Director slates, more typical of professional not-for-profit boards.

    The shorter term length was to keep this voice fresh and increase the accountability to the contributor community through frequent opportunity for the community to weigh in. After a few years it became clear that the one-year term was too short. It truly does take a year to get your bearings on any board. To enable an At-Large Director to make a meaningful contribution to the board, a two-year term was necessary and the director openings were staggered to keep elections annual.
  3. How to map the European structures and concepts to a US-based 501(c)3?

    Despite all the hours spent redesigning the organization, its structure, and its bylaws, there was never any consideration given to changing the name “The Drupal Association.” The US-based entity DrupalCon, Inc. (DCI) that had been created for DrupalCon DC as a Co-op was converted into the 501(c)3 and all of the assets from Drupal VZW were transferred to it. “The Drupal Association” was overlaid as a DBA (doing business as) due to the equity in the name and to minimize confusion. 

    For the US organization, the General Assembly (GA)’s oversight responsibilities (budget oversight, statutes, legal status, adding/removing members, etc.) moved to the Board of Directors with operational responsibilities transitioned to staff. We recognized that the elimination of the GA and the shift to a strategic board with a professional staff represented a necessary maturation of the organization and also had the potential to impact our culture unless deliberately preserved. Looking for opportunities for broader and more inclusive participation and to ensure that the voices of contributors remained strong, we created the At-Large Directors “elected by the community and ratified by the rest of the Board.”
The Challenge and Impact of Not Defining “Community”

The bylaws are silent on the definition of “community” even though it bestows a pretty important right to it. That lack of clarity has been the root cause of frustrations for both the community and the DA staff over the years and, it seems to me, underlies these current concerns. Without a clear alignment, it has been difficult to establish mutual expectations, to know what to expect and what might be expected in return.

This ambiguity becomes especially confusing in an organization that refers to itself an “Association.” The name itself implies there would be (or should be) members. In an association, the most common right bestowed upon a member of the association is voting eligibility.

Because “community” is not defined it falls to the Board to define. For expediency prior to those first At-Large elections, the DA used logging into Drupal.org in the year prior to the opening of the election to define the “community” as it was easy to quantify and provided some safeguards against fraud. While I recall discussing it as a board, the discussion was about technical feasibility rather than strategic value or engagement. I recall it as a case of measuring what was easy/feasible. We knew it was ridiculously overbroad, but it had worked well enough and better to be more inclusive than less. I don’t recall discussing or validating a definition of “community” with respect to election eligibility again during my tenure, which ended in December 2017.

The problem with this definition is that it sets the bar too low. It is not unreasonable that an organization ask that those who vote in its election be restricted to those who engage with and contribute to the organization. Failure to revisit this definition earlier has ossified an expedient definition into an expectant right. To change a privilege that had been in place that long (albeit one that was very underused) needed more communication with those impacted than was provided.

I fully support the Board in revisiting this neglected portion of its governance process. However, restricting voting eligibility to those with purchased memberships (while again expedient/easy) seems a flawed approach as it both perpetuates the “association” confusion and is overly restrictive. The DA bylaws explicitly state: “DrupalCon, Inc. (the "Corporation") is a Washington, D.C., nonprofit, public benefit corporation, and it has no members.” The fact that the DA offers individual “memberships” and is now extending voting rights only to those with membership is confusing. To be clear, these individual recurring donations are an essential form of support for the organization (as with any non-profit), but they do not constitute memberships of the non-profit corporation in a traditional association sense. Further, financial donations are not the only support upon which the DA relies. To bestow voting rights in exchange for primarily financial considerations (absent individual appeals) feels restrictive and like an alarming usurpation especially for an open source community.

What now?

Over the last ten years, the DA has gradually evolved and matured. The unique characteristics designed to ease the transition from VZW to DCI have increasingly been deprecated or brought into alignment with standard practice for a US-based 501(c)3. The changes have been gradual; to those actively involved in the DA, they might feel like a steady natural progression or for those who are newer to the organization, might feel completely non-controversial. It’s important to keep in mind that the 2019-2020 Drupal Association Board marked the first time when no former member of the Drupal VZW General Assembly (aside from Dries) served on the DA (DCI) Board. 

It seems to me that it is time to further evolve and here are my unsolicited recommendations:

  1. Clarify what the DA is: drop the legacy language inherited from our VZW days that is confusing and distracting. 
    • The organization is not an “Association”. It is a Foundation. Consider renaming it.
    • There are no “members”. There never have been. There are and always have been “contributors”. Discontinue calling financial supporters “members”. Orient services and benefits provided for contributors, both individual and organizational, comprehensively recognizing all forms of contribution.
    • Update the wording around the At-Large Director: “elected by the Contributors to the DA and ratified by the Board of Directors.”
  2. Clarify what the DA does: it is the clearinghouse for resources that support Drupal and its contributors. While the DA (and Drupal project itself) may provide benefit to those who are not contributors, the sustainability of the organization depends on optimizing benefit for those who are contributors.

    Adopting this lens provides the opportunity to clarify the ambiguous “community” in the bylaws with a much more objective definition of “contributors” particularly following implementation of the forthcoming recommendations from the Contribution Committee that recognizes all types of contribution (individual and organizational). 
  3. Consider expanding the number of At-Large Directors. As I left the Board, I advocated that the number of At-Large board positions be increased to 4, two elected each year. The switch to two-year terms for each At-Large Director was important. However, an unintended consequence of that change has been that those elected have been less globally representative than the representatives with two people elected at once. In fact, to date, all have been North American, with the exception of the remarkable Shyamala Rajaram from India in 2016 (the year of DrupalCon Asia, which saw increased eligibility and turnout).

    At-Large Directors bring tremendous value and perspective to the board. Ranked voting from a single pool for two positions gives candidates from smaller emergent contributor communities greater statistical odds of success. I encourage the board to consider expanding the number of At-Large Directors for that reason.

My hope is that by addressing some of these legacy semantic issues, the Drupal Association will be able to provide greater clarity, move forward into its next decade and build the kind of strong relationships that allow us all to focus on our shared goals.
 

Community Drupal Open Source

Promet Source: Advantages of Component-Based Web Design Systems

Main Drupal Feed - Sat, 09/19/2020 - 05:39
In the evolving world of web design and development, component-based design systems represent a revolutionary leap -- a previously missing link that replaces an environment of siloed functions and time-consuming complexities with high velocity capabilities that fuel flexibility, consistency, and collaboration.

Promet Source: Advantages of Component-Based Web Design Systems

Main Drupal Feed - Sat, 09/19/2020 - 05:39
In the evolving world of web design and development, component-based design systems represent a revolutionary leap -- a previously missing link that replaces an environment of siloed functions and time-consuming complexities with high velocity capabilities that fuel flexibility, consistency, and collaboration.

Drupal.org blog: What’s new on Drupal.org - August 2020

Main Drupal Feed - Fri, 09/18/2020 - 15:53

Read our roadmap to understand how this work falls into priorities set by the Drupal Association with direction and collaboration from the Board and community. You can also review the Drupal project roadmap.

Drupal.org Updates GitLab Merge Request beta

Back in July we kicked off the GitLab merge request beta, and over the course of August more and more project maintainers opted-in. The merge request workflow is available on more than 150 projects, and in several core issues. This is a *dramatic* improvement in the contribution workflow, especially for newer contributors or contributors making 'drive-by' contribution - and makes the lives of our existing long-term contributors much easier.

We're getting ever closer to enabling this workflow on every project across Drupal.org - but we still need your help! You can try out the contribution workflow on any of the projects that have opted in, opt-in your own projects, or check out the workflow in the core issues trying the beta.

Check out these issues to opt-in your project or core issue.  We anticipate general availability across all projects within just a few more weeks as we gather the final feedback from our beta contributors.

Auto Updates contribution week(s)!

During the week of August 3rd, 2020, representatives from three of the most successful open source content management systems came together to collaborate on a mechanism for securing software updates. Each of these open source projects is based on PHP, with similar use-cases, users, and update delivery architecture. By teaming up across these three projects, and any others who choose to join, we hope to standardize on a secure update delivery and validation mechanism. With this mechanism in place, each project can then build on top of it for additional features for our respective communities, such as providing secure automatic updates in Drupal.

      

Drupal, Typo3, and Joomla spent the week evaluating The Update Framework (aka TUF), an initiative of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation to provide a standardized framework or managing secure updates, minimize the impact of any potential compromises, and to be flexible enough to be used across different software systems.

Over the course of the week we made significant progress by replicating the reference implementation and its test fixtures in php, hosting the work in a shared repository: https://github.com/php-tuf/php-tuf. As we left the contribution we agreed to regroup in September for an additional collaboration. (That second contribution week has now happened, so look for an update in our September blog post!)

How can you get involved?

If you're interested in contributing to the PHP-TUF effort, you can take a look at the GitHub repository for the project: https://github.com/php-tuf/php-tuf

If you're connected to the Drupal community and are interested in PHP-TUF, or the larger initiative to work towards automatic updates, you can join us in Drupal Slack in the #autoupdates channel.

Per-project issue summary templates

Contributing to Drupal can be intimidating for a newcomer. One of the first barriers is just knowing 'how do I file a bug or feature request?'

Drupal core has a project issue summary template that is predefined to ask the right questions to help build a useful, actionable issue report.

And now, thanks to community contributors, each project hosted on Drupal.org can now define its own issue summary template - extending this great contributor onboarding feature to all projects in the Drupal ecosystem.

Launched the Lazy Load initiative

An increasing goal of the Drupal Association is to foster and onboard more major contributors to the Drupal project. One of the organizations we've been talking to recently is Google. Google has a vested interest in the performance of the open web, and over the course of the past several years has begun hosting a CMS leadership summit, to bring representatives from many CMS projects together.

As part of this growing collaboration, the Drupal Association has helped to coordinate is the Lazy-Load initiative, which seeks to load all images lazily in Drupal core by default. Google has generously sponsored this work, and we hope to see it included in Drupal 9.1.

Supporting DrupalCon Europe - now virtual!

DrupalCon Europe has gone virtual! Early in the year, many of us hoped that we might be able to come together in person in Barcelona this fall. Unfortunately, this was not to be. But the European community is not letting that stop them from having a great event - online!

The Drupal Association spent some time in August working with the DrupalCon Europe team to integrate their chosen virtual event platform with the events.drupal.org schedule!

Registration is open now: https://events.drupal.org/europe2020 

And you can browse the program here: https://events.drupal.org/europe2020/schedule/2020-12-08

———

As always, we’d like to say thanks to all the volunteers who work with us, and to the Drupal Association Supporters, who make it possible for us to work on these projects. In particular, we want to thank:

If you would like to support our work as an individual or an organization, consider becoming a member of the Drupal Association.

Follow us on Twitter for regular updates: @drupal_org, @drupal_infra

Drupal.org blog: What’s new on Drupal.org - August 2020

Main Drupal Feed - Fri, 09/18/2020 - 15:53

Read our roadmap to understand how this work falls into priorities set by the Drupal Association with direction and collaboration from the Board and community. You can also review the Drupal project roadmap.

Drupal.org Updates GitLab Merge Request beta

Back in July we kicked off the GitLab merge request beta, and over the course of August more and more project maintainers opted-in. The merge request workflow is available on more than 150 projects, and in several core issues. This is a *dramatic* improvement in the contribution workflow, especially for newer contributors or contributors making 'drive-by' contribution - and makes the lives of our existing long-term contributors much easier.

We're getting ever closer to enabling this workflow on every project across Drupal.org - but we still need your help! You can try out the contribution workflow on any of the projects that have opted in, opt-in your own projects, or check out the workflow in the core issues trying the beta.

Check out these issues to opt-in your project or core issue.  We anticipate general availability across all projects within just a few more weeks as we gather the final feedback from our beta contributors.

Auto Updates contribution week(s)!

During the week of August 3rd, 2020, representatives from three of the most successful open source content management systems came together to collaborate on a mechanism for securing software updates. Each of these open source projects is based on PHP, with similar use-cases, users, and update delivery architecture. By teaming up across these three projects, and any others who choose to join, we hope to standardize on a secure update delivery and validation mechanism. With this mechanism in place, each project can then build on top of it for additional features for our respective communities, such as providing secure automatic updates in Drupal.

      

Drupal, Typo3, and Joomla spent the week evaluating The Update Framework (aka TUF), an initiative of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation to provide a standardized framework or managing secure updates, minimize the impact of any potential compromises, and to be flexible enough to be used across different software systems.

Over the course of the week we made significant progress by replicating the reference implementation and its test fixtures in php, hosting the work in a shared repository: https://github.com/php-tuf/php-tuf. As we left the contribution we agreed to regroup in September for an additional collaboration. (That second contribution week has now happened, so look for an update in our September blog post!)

How can you get involved?

If you're interested in contributing to the PHP-TUF effort, you can take a look at the GitHub repository for the project: https://github.com/php-tuf/php-tuf

If you're connected to the Drupal community and are interested in PHP-TUF, or the larger initiative to work towards automatic updates, you can join us in Drupal Slack in the #autoupdates channel.

Per-project issue summary templates

Contributing to Drupal can be intimidating for a newcomer. One of the first barriers is just knowing 'how do I file a bug or feature request?'

Drupal core has a project issue summary template that is predefined to ask the right questions to help build a useful, actionable issue report.

And now, thanks to community contributors, each project hosted on Drupal.org can now define its own issue summary template - extending this great contributor onboarding feature to all projects in the Drupal ecosystem.

Launched the Lazy Load initiative

An increasing goal of the Drupal Association is to foster and onboard more major contributors to the Drupal project. One of the organizations we've been talking to recently is Google. Google has a vested interest in the performance of the open web, and over the course of the past several years has begun hosting a CMS leadership summit, to bring representatives from many CMS projects together.

As part of this growing collaboration, the Drupal Association has helped to coordinate is the Lazy-Load initiative, which seeks to load all images lazily in Drupal core by default. Google has generously sponsored this work, and we hope to see it included in Drupal 9.1.

Supporting DrupalCon Europe - now virtual!

DrupalCon Europe has gone virtual! Early in the year, many of us hoped that we might be able to come together in person in Barcelona this fall. Unfortunately, this was not to be. But the European community is not letting that stop them from having a great event - online!

The Drupal Association spent some time in August working with the DrupalCon Europe team to integrate their chosen virtual event platform with the events.drupal.org schedule!

Registration is open now: https://events.drupal.org/europe2020 

And you can browse the program here: https://events.drupal.org/europe2020/schedule/2020-12-08

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As always, we’d like to say thanks to all the volunteers who work with us, and to the Drupal Association Supporters, who make it possible for us to work on these projects. In particular, we want to thank:

If you would like to support our work as an individual or an organization, consider becoming a member of the Drupal Association.

Follow us on Twitter for regular updates: @drupal_org, @drupal_infra

Redfin Solutions: Writing Accessible Content in a Content Management System

Main Drupal Feed - Fri, 09/18/2020 - 15:06
Accessibility isn’t just a concern for web developers. With content being dynamically created, there are a few points content editors can keep in mind to make sure their content is accessible to everyone. Following accessibility standards helps non-visual users, but can also help all users find and understand the information they’re looking for.

BADCamp News: Earn Drupal contribution credit while upping your professional development at BADCamp

Main Drupal Feed - Fri, 09/18/2020 - 11:38
Earn Drupal contribution credit while upping your professional development at BADCamp Fri, 09/18/2020 - 12:00 volkswagenchick Fri, 09/18/2020 - 04:38

BADCamp is understanding that there are many different ways that folks can contribute back to Drupal. Not a coder!? Not a problem! We have plenty of opportunities for people to earn contribution credits while working on their professional development. 

Drupal Planet

BADCamp News: Earn Drupal contribution credit while upping your professional development at BADCamp

Main Drupal Feed - Fri, 09/18/2020 - 11:38
Earn Drupal contribution credit while upping your professional development at BADCamp Fri, 09/18/2020 - 12:00 volkswagenchick Fri, 09/18/2020 - 04:38

BADCamp is understanding that there are many different ways that folks can contribute back to Drupal. Not a coder!? Not a problem! We have plenty of opportunities for people to earn contribution credits while working on their professional development. 

Drupal Planet

Dries Buytaert: How governments can help sustain Open Source

Main Drupal Feed - Fri, 09/18/2020 - 11:34

Yesterday I wrote about why software funded with tax dollars should be Open Source. Based on the feedback in email and social media, lots of people seem to agree.

Today, I want to highlight how this could be a game changer for Open Source sustainability.

Using Drupal as an example, let's do some quick math. Imagine if:

  • 1,000 government agencies around the world (federal, state, or local) spend an average of $300,000 a year on their Drupal sites.
  • 5% of that investment results in Open Source contributions.

Even if these numbers are conservative, it would lead to $15 million in annual contributions to Drupal: 1,000 x $300,000 x 0.05 = $15,000,000. That could be 150 full-time contributors each year.

In other words, requiring public code in government could be Open Source's best funding mechanism.

Dries Buytaert: How governments can help sustain Open Source

Main Drupal Feed - Fri, 09/18/2020 - 11:34

Yesterday I wrote about why software funded with tax dollars should be Open Source. Based on the feedback in email and social media, lots of people seem to agree.

Today, I want to highlight how this could be a game changer for Open Source sustainability.

Using Drupal as an example, let's do some quick math. Imagine if:

  • 1,000 government agencies around the world (federal, state, or local) spend an average of $300,000 a year on their Drupal sites.
  • 5% of that investment results in Open Source contributions.

Even if these numbers are conservative, it would lead to $15 million in annual contributions to Drupal: 1,000 x $300,000 x 0.05 = $15,000,000. That could be 150 full-time contributors each year.

In other words, requiring public code in government could be Open Source's best funding mechanism.

Promet Source: What is Atomic Design?

Main Drupal Feed - Fri, 09/18/2020 - 03:44
Often, the most effective means of managing complexity is a laser-sharp focus on simplification -- breaking down a project into its smallest component parts and visualizing incremental  steps toward completion beginning with the smallest building blocks.   

Promet Source: What is Atomic Design?

Main Drupal Feed - Fri, 09/18/2020 - 03:44
Often, the most effective means of managing complexity is a laser-sharp focus on simplification -- breaking down a project into its smallest component parts and visualizing incremental  steps toward completion beginning with the smallest building blocks.   

Chapter Three: Drupal Backender Learns Gatsby: Speed up Gatsby Builds With Drupal Image Processing

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 09/16/2020 - 18:49

Gatsby Image, along with gatsby-transformer-sharp and gatsby-plugin-sharp, is a common way to handle images in a Gatsby project.  It gives us the power to process source images at build time to create a 'srcSet' for  '' or '' tags, or create versions in grayscale, duotone, cropped, rotated, etc.

When Gatsby builds from a Drupal source, it downloads the source images and processes them to create these image variations which are stored in the public directory. The ability to optimize and art-direct images at build time is great, but build performance suffers while these assets are generated. As a site grows in images, the time it takes to build grows as well. Image processing can take hours, while the rest of the build takes mere minutes.

Chapter Three: Drupal Backender Learns Gatsby: Speed up Gatsby Builds With Drupal Image Processing

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 09/16/2020 - 18:49

Gatsby Image, along with gatsby-transformer-sharp and gatsby-plugin-sharp, is a common way to handle images in a Gatsby project.  It gives us the power to process source images at build time to create a 'srcSet' for  '' or '' tags, or create versions in grayscale, duotone, cropped, rotated, etc.

When Gatsby builds from a Drupal source, it downloads the source images and processes them to create these image variations which are stored in the public directory. The ability to optimize and art-direct images at build time is great, but build performance suffers while these assets are generated. As a site grows in images, the time it takes to build grows as well. Image processing can take hours, while the rest of the build takes mere minutes.

myDropWizard.com: Drupal 6 core and CTools security update for SA-CORE-2020-007

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 09/16/2020 - 18:27

As you may know, Drupal 6 has reached End-of-Life (EOL) which means the Drupal Security Team is no longer doing Security Advisories or working on security patches for Drupal 6 core or contrib modules - but the Drupal 6 LTS vendors are and we're one of them!

Today, there is a Moderately Critical security release for Drupal core and CTools to fix a Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) vulnerability. You can learn more in the security advisory:

Drupal core - Moderately critical - Cross-site scripting - SA-CORE-2020-007

Here you can download:

If you have a Drupal 6 site, we recommend you update immediately! We have already deployed the patch for all of our Drupal 6 Long-Term Support clients. :-)

FYI, there were other Drupal core security advisories made today, but those don't affect Drupal 6.

If you'd like all your Drupal 6 modules to receive security updates and have the fixes deployed the same day they're released, please check out our D6LTS plans.

Note: if you use the myDropWizard module (totally free!), you'll be alerted to these and any future security updates, and will be able to use drush to install them (even though they won't necessarily have a release on Drupal.org).

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