Wordpress News

Architects Zymphonies Theme

Drupal Themes - Thu, 03/25/2021 - 04:17

Architects Zymphonies Theme is the powerful theme to create Architectural websites with Drupal 9 easier. It has a few of the key components requires for Architectural websites. It is a mobile-first responsive Bootstrap theme that has all Drupal default components as well. Read more

Live Demo Advanced Themes

Features
  • Drupal 8/9 core
  • Bootstrap v4
  • Mobile-first theme
  • Sticky header
  • Price table
  • Team listing
  • Well organized Sass code
  • Included Sass & Compass source file
  • Custom slider - unlimited image upload
  • Home page layouts
    • 2 column top layout
    • 4 column middle layout
    • 4 column bottom layout
Most installed Zymphonies theme Contact Zymphonies

Have Queries? Click here to contact Zymphonies

  • Free theme customization & additional features
  • Drupal custom theme development
  • Drupal website design & development
  • Drupal website migration

Sponsored by Zymphonies

Bootstrap OCMONO

Drupal Themes - Thu, 03/18/2021 - 16:38

WPTavern: WooCommerce Live Africa to Host First Online Meetup Event, March 18, 2021

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 03/17/2021 - 17:39

WooCommerce Live Africa is hosting its first online meetup on Thursday, March 18, 2021, from 5:30 PM to 7:00 PM GMT+1. The new regional group is part of the WooCommerce network of more than 100 meetups with nearly 30,000 members across 40 countries. Events will be focused on topics pertinent to store owners and entrepreneurs with a focus on making it easy for anyone to get started with e-commerce.

Mary Job and Sunday Ukafia will be hosting the first event, titled “Getting Started in eCommerce” that will guide new store owners from idea to first customer. No technical knowledge is required to join the session, since it’s aimed at absolute beginners. Topics include basic business concepts:

1. Choosing an audience
2. Finding a problem to solve
3. Selling your product before you make it
4. Creating the product
5. Choosing an operating system
6. Delivering the product to your customer
7. Creating happy customers

“What inspired the new group is the zeal to help every individual succeed in their eCommerce venture, connect with Woo individuals and businesses to learn more about how they use Woo and how we can all help each other overcome challenges and succeed,” Mary Job said.

In Nigeria, where Job is located, many store owners are using WooCommerce but most tend to focus on selling more via social media channels. Job said she hopes the group can help merchants be as successful with their WooCommerce stores as they already are with Whatsapp, Telegram, and social media.

“The local entrepreneur community is pretty optimistic, despite the environmental challenges that comes with doing business in our country,” Job said. “Add to that the irregular and inconsistent government policies (speaking for Nigeria alone here), can’t speak precisely for other African nations.”

The organizing team plans to focus future sessions on a range of skill levels from beginner to advanced. Registration is free and the link to the online event will be visible after you sign up.

HeroPress: Empowered To Make A Change

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 03/17/2021 - 08:13

The good part; When writing this, I am working with the top companies in the WooCommerce ecosystem, partnering with creative minds, making things happen that can make a massive difference to many users, or even an essential lifeline to their business survival due to a lockdown. As a partnership manager at YITH, I also had* the privilege of traveling worldwide and attended various WordCamps and WordPress events. I’ve co-organized WordCamps, Meetups, and with 28 WooCommerce London Meetups in 2020 alone.
* We are still in a local lock down due to covid at the time of writing this.

The rubbish part; Okay, nine years ago, life was not great, my daughter passed away, and I was stuck as a restaurant owner, working hard and not making much money, plus soon after, I started a court case against my landlord. Maybe this was the year I lost most of my hair, and it also caused my flare-up of UC… so hopefully, you get it, it was not a good time of my life, and I probably had every reason to find ‘the bottle’ more attractive.

From The Rubbish To The Good Part

When bad things happen to people, some will hide and go downhill, whereas others use this negative energy into something positive. I can’t say, I fall in either camp, but having been influenced by the right people around me, decisions I made, and by chance, I was being drawn towards the latter one.

Soon after our daughter died, my wife, Nihan enrolled in the open university to finish her Computer Science degree. I have massive admiration for Nihan’s strong determination, and I wholeheartedly supported her in this decision. We managed to finance this with an adult learning grant and working as a chef in various local pubs.

My wife’s coursework interested me a lot, and very soon, we started following the lectures together, plus extra course work I was practicing myself too.

Then came the idea of affiliate commission earnings through blogging, which I started out using Joomla as a CMS platform. Creating websites was slowly becoming a passion for me, and in these first few years, I enjoyed every part of the steep learning curb tackling the basics to more advanced coding and designs.

Diving Into The Web

After reducing hours as a chef, I followed various online courses in coding and e-commerce, SEO, and online marketing. One of the training courses I signed up for was a lifetime deal for OSTraining. The lessons came in particularly useful when I applied for a job as a WordPress designer. Please note that at this time, I had heard of WordPress and used it as a blogging platform but not played with it as a designer. One of the tutors on OSTraining became my absolute savior in the next two weeks before my interview for a new WordPress job. His name is Topher, also well-known for being the founder of HeroPress.

Having binge-watched various WP development topics and getting familiar with the structures, I was rather lucky to have been given the job. Still, this was only the beginning of my journey into the world of WordPress.

A year later, my boss asked me whether I would consider taking over the business and clients. Together with my wife, we started a new brand and company that we then build up over the years. This path naturally leads us into a niche of working with WooCommerce in combination with Online marketing.

As I often say to people, WordPress is just one of the tools in my box, just like a carpenter can’t do without a hammer.

The skill in using it efficiently comes over time and even then, there are different techniques. We all look back at projects and think: “ouch, why did I do it that way?” I often hear the term ‘imposter syndrome.’ I don’t believe in this, as I think whoever progresses and explores is eager to learn and wants to improve. It is frankly in human nature to drive ourselves forward. WordPress has evolved in so many branches that require different skills, and thank goodness for that, or we’d all be in competition. Instead, there are 100’s of areas of expertise, roles, and jobs that complement WordPress to make it what it is. A big part of that is each person’s personal background complements their skillsets. Think about it, who you are and what you do is influenced by what you have done and learned. Cherishing this, adding your culture, language, and experience and you suddenly find yourself more than qualified. And often these are not skills or certificates you list on a CV as they might be good and also bad experiences.

Joining A Business

The next part of this chapter was my dealings with YITH. As a long-term customer and having met some of the team at WordCamp London, I got into discussions to represent them at events held in the UK. This soon went global with me attending WordCamps in 3 other countries… and this was the moment I realized I could do much more with my connections and create meaningful partnerships. Within a few weeks, I crafted my dream job and sent a proposal to Nando, the CEO of YITH.

It is not easy to pitch yourself with an idea hoping that someone, I never met or spoken, understands this vision.

The doubts went through my head; “do I give up my business and work for the benefit of another company? What if I don’t get on? After all, I met 2 out of a team of 40 only three years ago… What do I do with my customers? Thinking of which, they have been demanding and not paying us on time. Plus, they annoy me when I want to be on holiday, not just that, they cause arguments between my wife and me. Because what is more important, family time or a site down and a business that is not earning enough money? Okay, this could work out, and I will try it for a year; if not, I can pick up my business again while my wife continues running it.” That was my thought process every day for months…

Then we agreed, and I was not sure if I should be happy or not. A year later, I can only say that working for Nando at YITH has been the best choice. He has been my mentor, supporter, devil’s advocate, and friend, but not a ‘boss.’ He has never told me what to do, but instead, asked questions to make me realize what is achievable, or even better, simply suggests me to read a book and come to my conclusions. YITH is an organization without hierarchy based on a holacratic structure.

The Yith Team

Looking Back

I often think back to the moment my daughter passed away. She only lived for a few days, but ask any bereaved parent; it is often the thought of: ‘what could have been.’ It will have been nine years, and every day, I wonder how events would have unfolded if she had survived. So, maybe her memory lives on in every decision I make and the paths I decide to take. But did I make the right decisions? I would have said yes, though only last week, my wife suggested she never really processed the events nine years ago. The path ahead will not always be straight, but whatever the next turning is, I hope I can nudge it in the right direction. After all, I have big and exciting plans ahead!

Is this story helpful to someone? Maybe it is for one of two reasons.

If you struggle to change your career, you can do this, though it might take a couple of years of a transitional period.

Only looking back do I realize that each small step slowly made a difference in my life. I am no guru or dare-devil entrepreneur that will tell you how to do things. No, I am an ordinary person with dreams and aspirations, just like there are so many in the world. But as I write this, it was WordPress that made this world smaller and empowered me to make a change. Learning from someone on the other side of the world and even getting work and customers from companies and people I never met before. Feeling welcomed into the WordPress community through Meetups and WordCamps added this human dimension and confidence that I can do ‘this’ too.

For those who had a personal tragedy, I hope that I can give you hope and strength to try and put your energy into something else that can lead to more significant changes in your life. Our minds are mighty and the tiny small decisions of: ‘if I do this then that, and if this then that’ – you see life is like a game of chess and you can influence the outcome a lot… I accept, not always, but take it as one positive decision at a time.

The post Empowered To Make A Change appeared first on HeroPress.

WPTavern: Automatically Create Image Slideshows With the Full Screen Galleries Plugin

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 03/16/2021 - 22:41

Earlier today, core WordPress contributor Nick Halsey released Full Screen Galleries, a plugin that automatically creates a full-screen slideshow when site visitors click on an image. The plugin works with all images, regardless of whether they are in a gallery block. It also supports both the classic and block editors.

Lightbox-type plugins are a dime a dozen. It is tough to wade through them to find the perfect solution. However, sometimes the simplest solution is the way to go. Halsey’s plugin has no settings screen, post metadata, or block options. It is plug-and-play. The only configuration is in activating the plugin itself.

Full Screen Galleries creates a slideshow-style overlay for all images located on a post or page. When a visitor clicks on one, the full-screen slideshow takes over the page.

Slideshow overlay from Full Screen Galleries.

Halsey has a demo page on his site where potential users can see the plugin in action.

There are more advanced options out there. Some show EXIF data, create transition effects and other types of animation, and offer a boatload of customizable settings. However, I prefer the simplicity of something that I can activate and forget. Over the years, I have come to appreciate these types of plugins more and more. They let me get back to focusing on the parts of my sites that I care about.

Full Screen Galleries also figures out the full-sized image URL automatically. If a gallery uses thumbnail-sized images and links to the attachment page, the slideshow will still display it in full.

Each slide outputs forward and back arrows to scroll between the images. In the top left corner is an exit button. In the top right, the plugin outputs a northeast arrow button that links to the original image. It also displays the image caption if it is available.

For many users, this is all they need. I am particularly interested in it because it works well with classic content. Many of the sites I am involved with have years of galleries from the pre-block era.

One of the downsides is that the plugin relies on jQuery. The plugin’s code has a small footprint, but jQuery has grown into a bit of a beast over the years and is becoming less and less relevant with more recent features of modern JavaScript. For many WordPress sites, this may be a non-issue because their theme or some other plugin is already loading the jQuery library. This plugin will be a lightweight addition. For others who are keeping it lean, they might want to seek out alternative solutions.

Regardless, this plugin is going into my toolbox, ready to pull out when I need it. Overall, it is a dependable version 1.0.

BuddyPress: BuddyPress 7.2.1 Security Release

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 03/16/2021 - 20:45

BuddyPress 7.2.1 is now available. This is a security release. All BuddyPress installations are strongly encouraged to upgrade as soon as possible.

The 7.2.1 release addresses 5 security issues which were reported privately to the BuddyPress team by Kien Hoang, in accordance with WordPress’s security policies:

  • A vulnerability was fixed that could allow a privilege escalation from a regular user to Administrator, using the BuddyPress REST API buddypress/v1/members/me endpoint.
  • A vulnerability was fixed that could allow a member to force a friendship on behalf of another member, using the BuddyPress REST API buddypress/v1/friends endpoint.
  • A vulnerability was fixed that could allow a member to read private messages in a thread they were not invited to, using the BuddyPress REST API buddypress/v1/messages endpoint.
  • A vulnerability was fixed that could allow a member to invite another member to join a group without being friends when that group restricted invites to friends only, using BuddyPress Nouveau and the BuddyPress REST API buddypress/v1/groups/invites endpoint.
  • A vulnerability was fixed that could allow a user that has just been demoted from an Administrator role to a Subscriber to add/edit/delete BuddyPress Member Types from the Administration screens introduced in the 7.0.0 release.

The BuddyPress Team also conducted a comprehensive security audit on all BuddyPress REST API endpoints, which led to:

  • Improving all permission methods to use a WP_Error object as the default return value.
  • Fixing unintended behavior allowing any member to edit their own Member Type.
  • Fixing unintended behavior that allowed any logged in member to list the members of a private group.

For an even deeper dive, visit the 7.2.1 changelog.

Our deepest gratitude goes out to Kien for practicing coordinated disclosure and being extremely patient while we worked through these issues.

Update to BuddyPress 7.2.1 today in your WordPress Dashboard, or by downloading from the WordPress.org plugin repository.

WPTavern: Attackers Continue to Exploit Vulnerabilities in The Plus Addons for Elementor Plugin

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 03/16/2021 - 19:26

Last week, security researchers at Seravo and WP Charged reported a critical zero-day vulnerability in The Plus Addons for Elementor on March 8, 2021. WPScan categorized it as an authentication bypass vulnerability:

The plugin is being actively exploited to by malicious actors to bypass authentication, allowing unauthenticated users to log in as any user (including admin) by just providing the related username, as well as create accounts with arbitrary roles, such as admin. These issues can be exploited even if registration is disabled, and the Login widget is not active.

It’s important to note that this particular vulnerability affects users of the commercial version of The Plus Addons for Elementor, not the free version, and not core Elementor.

The plugin’s authors pushed out a partially patched version 4.1.6 after disclosure and then a second version 4.1.7 to more fully address the issue.

Wordfence is reporting that they are still blocking attempts on sites that are using unpatched. They have blocked 1900 site takeover attempts from a specific username, blocked 1170 attempts from a specific email, and blocked 4,000 attempts over the past week. Attackers are still targeting sites that have not updated to the patched version.

“Evidence suggests it had been actively exploited for ~5 days before that,” Wordfence threat analyst Chloe Chamberland said on the Wordfence Live show today. “Our earliest date of compromise was March 5th that we know of so far. There was a vulnerability for a few days that nobody really knew about except for this attacker who was going out and exploiting it.”

Those whose sites have been exploited have seen malicious admin accounts created. Others have experienced every URL on their sites redirecting, making it very difficult to clean. Attackers have also been installing malicious plugins called “WP Strongs” and “WP Staff.” Those who cannot access the admin dashboard will have a more difficult time removing these plugins.

Elementor users who have the Plus Addons plugin installed are advised to update to the latest version and check for malicious plugins and files. Ideally, site owners who were subject to exploits would have a backup to restore. Chamberland concluded the Wordfence Live broadcast today by walking users through manually cleaning up exploited sites, including replacing the wp-includes and wp-admin folders, along with standard files outside those directories. The recording might be helpful for those who are struggling to clean up the damage.

CatTask Alpha

Drupal Themes - Tue, 03/16/2021 - 03:26

WPTavern: Google Accuses Microsoft of “Breaking the Open Web”

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 03/16/2021 - 03:13

Just before the weekend, Google published a caustic statement on Microsoft’s public support of Australia’s new law that forces Google and Facebook to pay publishers for their content. The law requires the companies to negotiate licensing agreements with publishers in order to include news articles in both search and news feeds, including snippets.

Last month, Microsoft published its endorsement of the Australian proposal and stated intentions for its Bing search engine to comply.

“In the hunt for better ideas, Google’s threat to boycott an entire country got our attention,” Microsoft President Brad Smith said.

“Satya Nadella and I reached out to Prime Minister Morrison. It was an opportunity to combine good business with a good cause and, as we explained, even if Google wanted to leave Australia, we would stay.”

After negotiations, Facebook decided to simply block Australian publishers from posting and block users from sharing any news originating from the country. In a full reversal, the company inked a three-year agreement with News Corp today, which covers The Australian national newspaper and several metropolitan papers.

Similarly, Google did not make good on its threat to remove its search engine from Australia, reluctantly making deals with Australian publishers and News Corp a few weeks ago. The company’s statement on Friday characterizes Microsoft’s position and its overt contrasting with Google, as “naked corporate opportunism” and an attack:

We also believe that this important debate should be about the substance of the issue, and not derailed by naked corporate opportunism … which brings us to Microsoft’s sudden interest in this discussion. We respect Microsoft’s success and we compete hard with them in cloud computing, search, productivity apps, video conferencing, email and many other areas. Unfortunately, as competition in these areas intensifies, they are reverting to their familiar playbook of attacking rivals and lobbying for regulations that benefit their own interests. They are now making self-serving claims and are even willing to break the way the open web works in an effort to undercut a rival. And their claims about our business and how we work with news publishers are just plain wrong.

The historic rivalry has been reignited, as Google fired back at Microsoft’s insinuation that the company doesn’t support journalism and is unwilling to collaborate with publishers.

“Proposals that would disrupt access to the open web (such as requiring payment for just showing links to websites) would hurt consumers, small businesses, and publishers,” Google’s SVP of Global Affairs Kent Walker said. “That’s why we’ve engaged constructively with publishers around the world on better solutions and will continue to do so.”

Microsoft supports Australia’s new law as a means to rectify “competitive imbalance between the tech sector and an independent press.” It also gives the company a high perch from which to call out Google and Facebook as “profitable tech gatekeepers on which businesses must advertise to reach consumers.” Microsoft believes its endorsement spurred Google to reverse its decision in order to remain in competition for the Australian search market.

“Unlike Google, if we can grow, we are prepared to sign up for the new law’s obligations, including sharing revenue as proposed with news organizations,” Brad Smith said. “The key would be to create a more competitive market, something the government can facilitate. But, as we made clear, we are comfortable running a high-quality search service at lower economic margins than Google and with more economic returns for the press.”

WPTavern: Compatibility Is Not Enough: The Eksell WordPress Theme Creates Art With Blocks

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 03/15/2021 - 22:54

It is easy to become jaded after reading the same old keyword-stuffed theme descriptions. After viewing the same hero-plus-three-boxes theme designs. After seeing another theme with “block editor styles” that utterly fails to deliver on its promise.

As I peruse the demo of Anders Norén’s latest WordPress theme, Eksell, I am reminded that artists still exist in the WordPress theming realm. For those familiar with his past theming work, this is not revelatory. Most of his 20+ free themes have 1,000s of active installations — Chaplin even became the base of the Twenty Twenty default theme.

Single post view.

Awaiting a theme from Norén is almost like counting down the days until your favorite director’s film hits the theater. You know you are going to like it before you see it. Even the worse outing is better than everything else spilling through the pipeline. Every now and then, you are greeted with something special.

I could not wait this time. Norén’s latest project is at a pitstop in the review system, so it is not officially available in the WordPress theme directory yet. In the meantime, anyone can still grab a ZIP file from its Trac ticket and upload it the old-fashioned way.

Eksell is a love letter to the block editor.

It is more than just making a few style adjustments to work around any quirks of the default block styles. It is an extension of those styles to create something unique. It is more than running a theme through a few tests and calling it compatible. It is looking at common problems and making sure they are styled correctly on the front end. And it is more than slapping a few blocks together and calling them a pattern. It is about providing users with a one-click solution for custom-designed or tough-to-build elements.

Building WordPress themes means being able to wrangle tons of elements that users can rearrange on a whim. The block editor has increased those pieces at least tenfold. It is rare to see a theme that manages to handle every edge case, and I am sure there are some that Eksell misses. However, the whole of the work is one of — if not the best — block-ready themes available today.

If there is one area in which Eksell did not go far enough, it is with block patterns. The theme registers five of them:

  • Cover Header
  • Featured Items
  • Call to Action
  • Contact Details
  • Stacked Full Groups
Cover Header block pattern.

Each of these is in the demo. However, there are some missed opportunities, such as the following three-column “pattern”:

Three columns with images on the outside and text on the inside.

Pros at building layouts with blocks could recreate that in minutes. A one-click option for inserting it into a post might save a headache or two for average users.

This is not the only example. Eksell’s demo is full of experimental groupings that showcase the flexibility of the block system. As bold as it is, the theme is a bit timid with its patterns. There is no need to be. They are already there. They simply need to be registered in the system.

Users can stack individual Image and Gallery blocks, making them appear as part of the same gallery. The theme automatically adjusts the margins between the blocks, bringing them together.

Gallery + Image + Gallery block stacked.

Another candidate for a block pattern.

And, here’s the thing. I firmly believe the traditional theming paradigm held back this theme. Its uniqueness is in its handling of blocks, which are still limited to the content area in WordPress. When the site editor and global styles land in WordPress later this year, a theme like this would already be miles ahead of others in integrating with Full Site Editing.

Eksell is more than just a theme that does cool stuff with the block editor. It is a genuinely useful portfolio theme. Instead of marketing it as yet another multipurpose general-purpose project, it has a target audience. Despite that, it is well-rounded enough to handle a variety of situations. Norén made sure the theme would work for blogging with on-point typography.

By default, the theme displays blog posts in a grid-style portfolio. However, Jetpack users can opt to use the plugin’s portfolio project post type to keep their portfolio separate from their blog.

One feature that might go overlooked is that Eksell provides an option to upload a fallback featured image. Far too often, portfolio-style themes with post-image grids fail to load a default image. The expectation is that the user will have featured images for every post, which is not always the case. When a theme is built around this idea, it needs to cover all of its bases, covering edge cases where things might fall apart. Eksell handles this, but Norén is an old pro at this point. He doubtless knows these common pitfalls.

The theme does not overwhelm users with options. It provides enough flexibility to personalize the theme’s color scheme and make a few layout-related decisions.

Old-school theme options will be a thing from a past era in the coming years. It is best to focus on the elements users will be working with for the long term. The customization power is with what users decide to do with blocks, and Eksell is ready for whatever users might throw at it.

Every WordPress theme author should dive into the Eksell theme. Consider it a free masterclass in building on top of the block editor. It is the standard by which we should be judging all other offerings.

WPTavern: Gutenberg Block Manager Plugin Enables Global Block Removal and Recategorization

Wordpress Planet - Sat, 03/13/2021 - 03:14

The world of Gutenberg blocks is expanding. WordPress’ official block directory launched in June 2020 with just 60 single-block plugins. Today, it has grown to more than 480 blocks. As users incorporate more blocks into their websites, the block inserter can become a very long list to scroll when browsing.

Block management capabilities were added to Gutenberg in version 5.3, released in 2019. It allows users to search for a block and turn individual blocks and sections on or off in the block inserter. The feature hasn’t changed much over the past two years but will soon be getting a major update that will relocate it to the Preferences modal and redesign it to use panels with support for toggling block variations on and off.

If you need more fine-grained block management, Darren Cooney‘s Gutenberg Block Manager plugin offers an admin interface for removing and recategorizing blocks. It is different from the core capabilities in that site admins can globally manage the enabled/disabled state of each block and changes will be reflected in the block inserter for all users. The plugin provides a full-screen interface for managing blocks on its own settings page outside of the editor.

Each block has a description and a toggle button for disabling it. There is enough space to include the number of instances for each block, and this seems like something useful the plugin could add in the future. Block categories are available as a quick navigation list in the sidebar and entire categories can be turned on or off with one click.

The latest version of the plugin adds Category Switcher support for all blocks, including core Gutenberg blocks. Changing a block’s category will update its location in the block inserter.

This plugin could be useful for periodically tidying up, improving the organization of blocks within the block inserter. Paring back the list of available blocks could also make it easier for website managers to have access to only the blocks that are necessary for their work. The plugin includes a filter for controlling the status of blocks across multiple WordPress environments.

After testing the Gutenberg Block Manager, my only criticism is that the plugin’s name is the same as the core WordPress feature, making it somewhat confusing. It might be more clear to focus on its distinctions and include that in the name, such as “Global Block Manager” or some variation. Other than that, it functions just as advertised and is available for free in the official plugins directory.

WPTavern: 2nd Annual Atarim Web Agency Summit Kicks Off March 23

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 03/12/2021 - 17:16

Atarim is launching its 2nd annual Web Agency Summit in a couple of weeks. The free event will run from March 23 – 26. The goal of the event is to help agencies and freelancers in the WordPress space grow sustainable businesses.

Atarim is the company formerly known as WP Feedback. In February, the business rebranded because its primary product had grown beyond a mere feedback plugin into an across-the-board agency solution.

“While I’m a big fan of WordCamps and a big believer in the value that events can bring to personal growth, we found that most events in our space focus on the technical aspect of building a website,” said Vito Peleg, Atarim’s founder. “We take a more business-oriented approach. From finding the first clients through building solid recurring revenue and all the way to lessons from some of the biggest agencies in the world at full scale.”

The event has 36 sessions, which are broken down into four categories that focus on:

  • Build: Best practices for performance, SEO, accessibility, and the future of building websites.
  • Expand: Building recurring revenue and maintaining profits.
  • Scale: Project management, completing services, payment, and getting projects unstuck.
  • Thrive: Hiring, community building, profitability at scale, and exit strategies.

Peleg hopes that attendees can glean some knowledge in the sessions while saving years of trial and error.

“All are delivered through our own summit platform, so attendees don’t need to jump around between Zoom calls, YouTube Lives, and Slack channels,” he said. “We brought it all into our own interactive platform.”

Atarim has made several sessions publicly available from 2020’s event. For those on the fence, it should provide insight into the types of talks they can expect.

This year, each session will be running live — last year’s sessions were pre-recorded. This will allow attendees to be involved in real-time. There will also be a designated Q&A time for each session.

The event is free to attend through the last week of March for anyone. However, the sessions will eventually fall behind a paywall, which helps cover costs.

“We offer an All Access Pass for those that want to watch the replays for $97, which is the investment for those that get it before the event,” said Peleg. “This also includes 30+ sessions from last year’s event for a total of 50+ hours of expert advice, specifically designed to help web freelancers and agencies build a solid business.”

Success and Lessons Learned From 2020

Last year’s event kick-started as a response to the changing nature of conferences in the Covid-era. Peleg described the initiative as a way of “licking our own wounds” after his company had planned to attend, sponsor, and have its own retreat at WordCamp Asia in Thailand, which was canceled in 2020.

“This drove me into action, wanting to lift some spirits in the community,” he said. “I didn’t know that we would end up with the biggest event in the WordPress space and have such incredible partners that came along for the ride.”

Last year’s event had 5,725 attendees from 126 countries. In total, they watched 53,945 hours of videos. They also won 1,000s of prizes at sponsor booths that included iPads, board games, and more.

“This was way more than what we expected, and the summit platform even broke on the first day when we were getting more than 240,000 requests to the server in an hour,” said Peleg. “Luckily, there isn’t a better community for something like this to happen. Very quickly, some of the sponsors joined forces with some of the speakers and our team and got us back on the air for a full week of action. While they were working to get this sorted, I was mostly pacing back and forth in my office like a headless chicken, but this year we’ve come prepared, with load balancers, auto-scaling processes, and a much leaner platform to sustain the scale.”

There are no plans to switch to a physical Web Agency Summit in the coming years. For now, the virtual model is working.

“I’m very much looking forward to the return of WordCamps as physical events when [Covid-19] blows over, but I believe that virtual events are here to stay, so for the foreseeable future, once a year, we’ll bring back our summit as a celebration of the business side of the WordPress industry.”

WPTavern: Publish Text, Image, and Gallery Snippets With the Shortnotes WordPress Plugin

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 03/11/2021 - 22:04

Yesterday, Happy Prime owner and engineer Jeremy Felt released Shortnotes, a plugin for writing notes from the WordPress editor. The intention is for users to create short pieces of content, such as that found on Twitter, Instagram, and similar social networks. However, it does not come with a front-end posting interface, at least not in version 1.0.

The plugin works just like the post and page editor. It should be straightforward for most users.

While the Shortnotes plugin is relatively bare-bones for now, it serves as a foundation of something that could be more. Part of what makes social networks appealing is the ease of publishing quick content. Publishing notes through the plugin requires visiting the WordPress admin, clicking “Add New,” writing the content, publishing, and clicking a new link to view it on the front end. A quick-publishing interface either through a Dashboard widget or a front-end form would be a useful addition.

Note post type in the block editor.

Some new concepts that not all users may be familiar with are the “Reply to URL” and “Reply to name” fields. These are semantic fields for creating a note in reply to another post or person on the web. The plugin will automatically output this reply link on the front end.

The plugin integrates with the Webmention plugin. A Webmention is a standardized protocol for mentions and conversations across the web. The goal is a decentralized social “network” of sorts where everyone owns and controls their content. It is an alternative to what IndieWeb calls the “corporate” web in which large tech companies have control.

When entering a Reply to URL, Shortnotes will automatically send that URL through the Webmentions plugin system. It will also parse URLs in the post content as webmentions if they exist.

Users may also notice that the note title field is missing. This is intentional. The plugin automatically generates titles. They are needed for the <title> tag, which tools like search engines use.

The idea is for titles to not appear as part of the theme layout. Because most themes are not coded to check for post-type support before displaying them, there is a high chance that a user’s theme will output the auto-generated title on the front end. For now, that means editing a bit of theme code for those who do not want them to appear. Felt has an example of how he modified this for his site’s custom Twenty Twenty-One child theme. In the long run, as more themes begin supporting the upcoming site editor, users will be able to make this customization directly in the WordPress admin.

With a few tweaks like removing the title and some minor CSS adjustments, I was able to create a clean Notes archive page using the Genesis Block theme:

Modified notes archive.

One of my interests in checking this project out was diving into a real-world example of a plugin that limited which blocks could be used with the editor. The notes post type only allows the Paragraph, Image, and Gallery blocks. Again, the idea is to replicate the feel of what you can do on social networks. Overall, this feature worked as it should, limiting the notes to a subset of blocks.

However, I ran across a bug with the block editor. All block patterns, regardless of what blocks they contained, appeared in the inserter. Clicking on one containing a disallowed block would not insert it into a post. However, the editor did add a pop-up note that it had. There is a GitHub issue for this bug that has seen little movement since it was opened in June 2020.

Felt created a plugin to solve this called Unregister Broken Patterns. It removes any patterns that contain blocks that a post type does not support. At best, it is a temporary measure and needs to be addressed in WordPress.

WPTavern: Publish Text, Image, and Gallery Snippets With the Shortnotes WordPress Plugin

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 03/11/2021 - 22:04

Yesterday, Happy Prime owner and engineer Jeremy Felt released Shortnotes, a plugin for writing notes from the WordPress editor. The intention is for users to create short pieces of content, such as that found on Twitter, Instagram, and similar social networks. However, it does not come with a front-end posting interface, at least not in version 1.0.

The plugin works just like the post and page editor. It should be straightforward for most users.

While the Shortnotes plugin is relatively bare-bones for now, it serves as a foundation of something that could be more. Part of what makes social networks appealing is the ease of publishing quick content. Publishing notes through the plugin requires visiting the WordPress admin, clicking “Add New,” writing the content, publishing, and clicking a new link to view it on the front end. A quick-publishing interface either through a Dashboard widget or a front-end form would be a useful addition.

Note post type in the block editor.

Some new concepts that not all users may be familiar with are the “Reply to URL” and “Reply to name” fields. These are semantic fields for creating a note in reply to another post or person on the web. The plugin will automatically output this reply link on the front end.

The plugin integrates with the Webmention plugin. A Webmention is a standardized protocol for mentions and conversations across the web. The goal is a decentralized social “network” of sorts where everyone owns and controls their content. It is an alternative to what IndieWeb calls the “corporate” web in which large tech companies have control.

When entering a Reply to URL, Shortnotes will automatically send that URL through the Webmentions plugin system. It will also parse URLs in the post content as webmentions if they exist.

Users may also notice that the note title field is missing. This is intentional. The plugin automatically generates titles. They are needed for the <title> tag, which tools like search engines use.

The idea is for titles to not appear as part of the theme layout. Because most themes are not coded to check for post-type support before displaying them, there is a high chance that a user’s theme will output the auto-generated title on the front end. For now, that means editing a bit of theme code for those who do not want them to appear. Felt has an example of how he modified this for his site’s custom Twenty Twenty-One child theme. In the long run, as more themes begin supporting the upcoming site editor, users will be able to make this customization directly in the WordPress admin.

With a few tweaks like removing the title and some minor CSS adjustments, I was able to create a clean Notes archive page using the Genesis Block theme:

Modified notes archive.

One of my interests in checking this project out was diving into a real-world example of a plugin that limited which blocks could be used with the editor. The notes post type only allows the Paragraph, Image, and Gallery blocks. Again, the idea is to replicate the feel of what you can do on social networks. Overall, this feature worked as it should, limiting the notes to a subset of blocks.

However, I ran across a bug with the block editor. All block patterns, regardless of what blocks they contained, appeared in the inserter. Clicking on one containing a disallowed block would not insert it into a post. However, the editor did add a pop-up note that it had. There is a GitHub issue for this bug that has seen little movement since it was opened in June 2020.

Felt created a plugin to solve this called Unregister Broken Patterns. It removes any patterns that contain blocks that a post type does not support. At best, it is a temporary measure and needs to be addressed in WordPress.

WPTavern: Publish Text, Image, and Gallery Snippets With the Shortnotes WordPress Plugin

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 03/11/2021 - 22:04

Yesterday, Happy Prime owner and engineer Jeremy Felt released Shortnotes, a plugin for writing notes from the WordPress editor. The intention is for users to create short pieces of content, such as that found on Twitter, Instagram, and similar social networks. However, it does not come with a front-end posting interface, at least not in version 1.0.

The plugin works just like the post and page editor. It should be straightforward for most users.

While the Shortnotes plugin is relatively bare-bones for now, it serves as a foundation of something that could be more. Part of what makes social networks appealing is the ease of publishing quick content. Publishing notes through the plugin requires visiting the WordPress admin, clicking “Add New,” writing the content, publishing, and clicking a new link to view it on the front end. A quick-publishing interface either through a Dashboard widget or a front-end form would be a useful addition.

Note post type in the block editor.

Some new concepts that not all users may be familiar with are the “Reply to URL” and “Reply to name” fields. These are semantic fields for creating a note in reply to another post or person on the web. The plugin will automatically output this reply link on the front end.

The plugin integrates with the Webmention plugin. A Webmention is a standardized protocol for mentions and conversations across the web. The goal is a decentralized social “network” of sorts where everyone owns and controls their content. It is an alternative to what IndieWeb calls the “corporate” web in which large tech companies have control.

When entering a Reply to URL, Shortnotes will automatically send that URL through the Webmentions plugin system. It will also parse URLs in the post content as webmentions if they exist.

Users may also notice that the note title field is missing. This is intentional. The plugin automatically generates titles. They are needed for the <title> tag, which tools like search engines use.

The idea is for titles to not appear as part of the theme layout. Because most themes are not coded to check for post-type support before displaying them, there is a high chance that a user’s theme will output the auto-generated title on the front end. For now, that means editing a bit of theme code for those who do not want them to appear. Felt has an example of how he modified this for his site’s custom Twenty Twenty-One child theme. In the long run, as more themes begin supporting the upcoming site editor, users will be able to make this customization directly in the WordPress admin.

With a few tweaks like removing the title and some minor CSS adjustments, I was able to create a clean Notes archive page using the Genesis Block theme:

Modified notes archive.

One of my interests in checking this project out was diving into a real-world example of a plugin that limited which blocks could be used with the editor. The notes post type only allows the Paragraph, Image, and Gallery blocks. Again, the idea is to replicate the feel of what you can do on social networks. Overall, this feature worked as it should, limiting the notes to a subset of blocks.

However, I ran across a bug with the block editor. All block patterns, regardless of what blocks they contained, appeared in the inserter. Clicking on one containing a disallowed block would not insert it into a post. However, the editor did add a pop-up note that it had. There is a GitHub issue for this bug that has seen little movement since it was opened in June 2020.

Felt created a plugin to solve this called Unregister Broken Patterns. It removes any patterns that contain blocks that a post type does not support. At best, it is a temporary measure and needs to be addressed in WordPress.

WPTavern: New Full Site Editing Testing Challenge: Create a Custom 404 Page

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 03/11/2021 - 16:14

The Full Site Editing (FSE) Outreach program has launched its third testing call, continuing the effort to engage users in a structured testing flow focused on specific practical tasks. Previous rounds had testers building a custom homepage and exploring the distinction between editing modes (template vs page/post).

The challenge in round #3 is to create a fun, custom 404 page. This page is often an opportunity for brands and individuals to inject a little humor and creativity into their websites, transforming a potentially negative experience into a path back to working links. In the past, site owners not comfortable with code had to rely on plugins in order to design their 404 pages. The new FSE capabilities will open a whole new world of customization.

Testers who want to jump in on this challenge will need to set up a testing environment that uses WordPress 5.7, the TT1 Blocks Theme, and Gutenberg 10.1.1 (latest version). Nothing special is required so it’s easy to jump in and start testing right away.

Anne McCarthy, who is spearheading the FSE Outreach program, has published a detailed testing flow that provides a guided exploration of the 404 template and simple tasks like adding navigation and other blocks.

This challenge seemed like a good place to dip my toe into FSE testing and check out the progress the team has made in the past few months. Here is what I set out to do: add a funny gif, a search form, and a button to get back home.

One of the first steps is to open the Navigation Toggle and head to Templates > 404. The “Navigation Toggle” refers to the WordPress icon in the top left corner of the page, but as a new user I would expect that to take me back to the dashboard. The naming doesn’t seem clear and I had to look up what was meant by Navigation Toggle.

Following the instructions, I selected the Header template part and removed it from the 404 page, but I don’t think it’s obvious to users that it’s possible to delete the entire template part in one go. Without the instructions, I probably would have started deleting all the blocks within the header template part before trying to figure out how to remove the entire thing.

The testing flow asks users to insert a Template Part Block, select the “New Template Part” option, and add a custom title like “404 Header.” While this feature technically works, it seems like power user knowledge and I don’t see less technical site owners having any idea that this is possible or understanding its purpose without reading tutorials.

One aspect of it that could be improved is that new Template Parts don’t save until you click “Update Design.” If you move away from the block and continue other parts of the design, it appears that it hasn’t saved and you may be tempted to create it again, as I was. Clicking “Update Design” will show you all the Template Parts you have created and requires confirmation to save them. This can get confusing if you don’t make a point to stop and save periodically.

Once the design is saved, there is no confirmation but the button is no longer operable. The interface could communicate this better.

I didn’t encounter anything that was broken, though several aspects of it could be significantly improved. Everything outlined in the testing flow seems to work as it should, if users can ever find it. It is going to be a real challenge to make the interface spectacularly simple enough for ordinary users to feel comfortable knowing when and how to create their own template parts.

Adding more blocks was easy enough when I customized the 404 page content. I skipped the part of the testing script that involved creating a menu.

Unfortunately, the preview looked nothing like the display on the frontend, but I assume that is still in progress. After trying multiple sources, I found that embeds didn’t work and some of the block styles were off.

The testing flow for this challenge focused primarily on creating content within the new Template Part. That aspect of the test seemed to work, but there are a few things that could be significantly improved. The last part of the challenge is to answer the following questions:

  • Did the experience crash at any point? No
  • Did the saving experience work properly? Yes but it was confusing without any confirmation.
  • Did the saving experience make sense when making changes to the Template Part vs the general content? It did after taking some time to explore it, but it’s not a concept that would be immediately evident to beginners.
  • What did you find particularly confusing or frustrating about the experience? Saving template parts was confusing, and the previews are much better than what you get on the frontend.
  • What did you especially enjoy or appreciate about the experience? I appreciated the ability to edit templates and template parts without jumping into code.
  • Did you find that what you created in the Site Editor matched what you saw when you viewed your 404 page? No, it was far from similar to the preview.
  • Did it work using Keyboard only? No
  • Did it work using a screen reader? Did not test

My expectation when I began testing the 404 page design editing experience was that it would be a simple and enjoyable customization process with a few bugs. It ended up frustrating in the end because I could not trust the previews at all.

Is WordPress close to having an MVP of full site editing ready for 5.8? All the bones are in place. It feels like a rough prototype with enough momentum to reach MVP status in a few months. Editing and saving template parts works but the current interface design falls squarely within the realm of power users.

If you want to join this challenge, follow the testing flow and post your feedback by March 23, 2021.

WPTavern: A Throwback To the Past: Introducing the Blogroll Block WordPress Plugin

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 03/10/2021 - 23:45

It was 2003. I was just getting my first taste of blogging and similar experiments on the world wide web. Seemingly every blog I toured showcased a long list of the owner’s friends. These were all the other cool kids jumping onto this blogging bandwagon — the blogroll was almost a status symbol. You had a sense of belonging with your online clique.

Let’s face it. Many of the people blogging in that era were loners, geeks, nerds, artists, and people who generally did not feel they fit into groups of “normal” people. Perhaps that is overly stereotypical, but that was the culture I found exploring this new world. It was a breakthrough for me as a person. I could let my geek flag fly in this new group of non-normal-but-so-much-more-interesting people than those I grew up with from my small hometown. Blogs were a home away from home for those who felt like outsiders.

I could share that I cared more about comic books than football on my little corner of the web. I could link to like-minded people in my blogroll. And they would link back to me.

It has been eight years since the death of the link manager in WordPress. The underlying code is still there, only shown for those with existing links or the Link Manager plugin installed.

It was the end of an era. Social media had taken over much of that camaraderie from my early venture into the blogging world, replacing it with a much more toxic version. There are groups and pockets within the social spheres that replicate that feeling, but it is all on a third-party server. The people no longer control their content or their content’s fate. Our likes and shares and retweets are lost in the endless void of memes, parodies, and libelous hot-takes. We no longer curate our links, cutting out the cruft to make room for the things representing who we are in the moment.

One of the early highlights of my development career was building an image gallery using the WordPress links system. I was able to showcase all of my must-read WordPress blogs on one page.

Link manager used to create image gallery.

I also used the link manager as a menu-management interface for my theme users long before WordPress adopted its nav menu system. Themes at the time were still using a page-listing function that often required end-users to edit code to manage.

Not only was the blogroll a vital aspect of my introduction to blogging, but it was also equally as crucial to my evolution as a developer. WordPress’s built-in link manager allowed me to step outside the box and innovate.

Maybe I am a bit nostalgic for blogrolls adorning every blog’s sidebar. There was a bit of a trust system built into it. If I liked your blog, there was a good chance that I would find something interesting in the links that you decided to share.

Sure, there are other ways to achieve the same result today. However, the blogroll was a neon-sign in pitch black that shouted, “Hey, check out these cools things!”

That is why I am giddy any time I see something that takes me down the memory lane of nearly two decades ago. It reminds me of how far we have come and how the web has changed over the years. And how much I wish things would sometimes stay the same.

Michael Beckwith released the Blogroll Block plugin two weeks ago. While I do not see a blogrolling revolution any time soon, it is nice to see a block-editor option for those of us who are still clinging to our links.

Blogroll Block requires the Link Manager plugin, which still has 60,000 active installs despite no updates since it was first dropped into the WordPress plugin directory. Maybe there is hope for a comeback.

The block is straightforward. It replicates most of the options for the wp_list_bookmarks() function, which outputs the links. The downside to the plugin is there is no live preview in the editor. It currently outputs a box with a link to the developer reference. I am hoping this is a stopgap measure between version 1.0 and the next iteration.

Editor view of the Blogroll Block.

I would also like to see the option to include link images in a grid. That way, I could recreate my “bookmarks gallery” with the block editor. That would be a fun afternoon project.

If we had a blogroll on the Tavern, I like to think that we would link to Beckwith’s blog. We are on his. It would only be fair.

WPTavern: A Throwback To the Past: Introducing the Blogroll Block WordPress Plugin

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 03/10/2021 - 23:45

It was 2003. I was just getting my first taste of blogging and similar experiments on the world wide web. Seemingly every blog I toured showcased a long list of the owner’s friends. These were all the other cool kids jumping onto this blogging bandwagon — the blogroll was almost a status symbol. You had a sense of belonging with your online clique.

Let’s face it. Many of the people blogging in that era were loners, geeks, nerds, artists, and people who generally did not feel they fit into groups of “normal” people. Perhaps that is overly stereotypical, but that was the culture I found exploring this new world. It was a breakthrough for me as a person. I could let my geek flag fly in this new group of non-normal-but-so-much-more-interesting people than those I grew up with from my small hometown. Blogs were a home away from home for those who felt like outsiders.

I could share that I cared more about comic books than football on my little corner of the web. I could link to like-minded people in my blogroll. And they would link back to me.

It has been eight years since the death of the link manager in WordPress. The underlying code is still there, only shown for those with existing links or the Link Manager plugin installed.

It was the end of an era. Social media had taken over much of that camaraderie from my early venture into the blogging world, replacing it with a much more toxic version. There are groups and pockets within the social spheres that replicate that feeling, but it is all on a third-party server. The people no longer control their content or their content’s fate. Our likes and shares and retweets are lost in the endless void of memes, parodies, and libelous hot-takes. We no longer curate our links, cutting out the cruft to make room for the things representing who we are in the moment.

One of the early highlights of my development career was building an image gallery using the WordPress links system. I was able to showcase all of my must-read WordPress blogs on one page.

Link manager used to create image gallery.

I also used the link manager as a menu-management interface for my theme users long before WordPress adopted its nav menu system. Themes at the time were still using a page-listing function that often required end-users to edit code to manage.

Not only was the blogroll a vital aspect of my introduction to blogging, but it was also equally as crucial to my evolution as a developer. WordPress’s built-in link manager allowed me to step outside the box and innovate.

Maybe I am a bit nostalgic for blogrolls adorning every blog’s sidebar. There was a bit of a trust system built into it. If I liked your blog, there was a good chance that I would find something interesting in the links that you decided to share.

Sure, there are other ways to achieve the same result today. However, the blogroll was a neon-sign in pitch black that shouted, “Hey, check out these cools things!”

That is why I am giddy any time I see something that takes me down the memory lane of nearly two decades ago. It reminds me of how far we have come and how the web has changed over the years. And how much I wish things would sometimes stay the same.

Michael Beckwith released the Blogroll Block plugin two weeks ago. While I do not see a blogrolling revolution any time soon, it is nice to see a block-editor option for those of us who are still clinging to our links.

Blogroll Block requires the Link Manager plugin, which still has 60,000 active installs despite no updates since it was first dropped into the WordPress plugin directory. Maybe there is hope for a comeback.

The block is straightforward. It replicates most of the options for the wp_list_bookmarks() function, which outputs the links. The downside to the plugin is there is no live preview in the editor. It currently outputs a box with a link to the developer reference. I am hoping this is a stopgap measure between version 1.0 and the next iteration.

Editor view of the Blogroll Block.

I would also like to see the option to include link images in a grid. That way, I could recreate my “bookmarks gallery” with the block editor. That would be a fun afternoon project.

If we had a blogroll on the Tavern, I like to think that we would link to Beckwith’s blog. We are on his. It would only be fair.

HeroPress: How WordPress Made Space For Me As A Kid Who Grew Up With MS – Come WordPress Mi Ha Accolta Quando Ero Una Bambina Crescendo Con La Sclerosi Multipla

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 03/10/2021 - 09:05

Questo saggio è disponibile anche in italiano.

I was first introduced to WordPress when I was 13 years old. My parents had the idea to give me my very own WordPress website. I was able to use, play, test, and try whatever I wanted with it.

My First Encounter With WordPress

While the technical aspects of my new WordPress website intrigued me, I was more interested in the space it made for me to write. All throughout my childhood I had struggled with chronic pain, fatigue, and other unexplained symptoms. Having a private world I could call my own, I was able to write my story.

And there is something truly amazing about having a place to tell your story.

When doctors, nurses, specialists, and the best hospitals I could go to struggled to find answers for me and my parents, I felt like my life and world were out of control. But logging onto my little website and typing away on the computer keys gave me a sense of control. I couldn’t always do things that other kids had the energy to do. But I could get lost in writing for hours. I couldn’t control my life story, but I could write about it.

It felt like writing letters to my future self, “Look at what you went through, look how strong you were.” And even now, when I go on, I feel like I’m writing letters to my past self, “Look at you, look how you made it.”

WordPress In The Real World

I swear I thought that when I grew up, that I’d be healthy. I thought that “unhealthiness” was a part of being a kid. Something as terrible as having a bedtime, or having to eat carrots.

And like most kids, I couldn’t wait to be a grown up so that I could stay up as late as I wanted, never eat carrots again, and— be healthy.

But growing up didn’t change that. In fact, my condition grew slowly worse as years went by. I was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, a decade later at 18 years old.

I realized that I couldn’t handle a 9-5 work schedule, I couldn’t drive to a job on some days (shout-out to my mom for driving me) and I knew deep down that I would need to find another way to work.

I began writing music and book reviews online. I wrote blog posts. They were getting published and I was getting paid too. WordPress felt familiar, typing on the computer keys felt comfortable, and sharing my words with the world felt surreal.

I think I believed WordPress was mine somehow. I was learning that WordPress is something that belongs to everyone in some way. And I loved it.

My WordPress Job at Valet

The thing I love about WordPress is that it’s not just for developers or bloggers or SEO experts. I began to meet more people in the community and was delighted to find people like me, who didn’t know the technical stuff, but were a part of WordPress.

There were social media managers, there were designers, there was a place for everyone. And the community felt as important as the rest of everything that makes WordPress what it is. It felt like it was about people and relationships as well as codes and databases.

I was hired at Valet in 2020 thanks to my relationships with people, in this case, my very own dad.

I like being a part of a WordPress company, and I love that I contribute to a team that helps people with their websites. I understand the importance of having a space that’s yours. Whether it’s a business or personal site, having a website gives you the power of telling your own story.

I didn’t have to work 9-5 jobs, or have my mom drive me to work, I didn’t have to worry about days when I needed to just stay in sweats. I have a 100% remote job which I can do despite the plot twists in my story, thanks to WordPress and the people in it.

Welcomed Into The WordPress Community

Kimberly Lipari was the first person to repeatedly tell me that I was really indeed a part of the WordPress community. It felt unreal. I wasn’t a dev, I don’t know how to code, and yet I got to be a part of it all? I felt like I was a fake. But she continues to remind me that I’m real, I get to be here, I get to stay, I have a place.

When Michelle Frechette told me I could contribute to Big Orange Heart, I was honored. I was typing my words, pieces of my story, and sharing them with a community of people.

And when Topher contacted me to write my WordPress Story for HeroPress I could only say yes.

I could go on and on, this community is not perfect, but everyone here is constantly working to be better and do better.

My WordPress Story

I’m proud and grateful to be sharing my story today.

I hope that maybe it can be a letter to anyone out there thinking, “I won’t make it.”

I hope that it will remind anyone reading this that WordPress is a space for everyone. Healthy or not, developer or not, blogger or not— WordPress belongs to you too.

I hope most of all that my story can somehow remind you that your story is important.

Come WordPress Mi Ha Accolta Quando Ero Una Bambina Crescendo Con La Sclerosi Multipla

Sono stata introdotta a WordPress per la prima volta quando avevo 13 anni. I miei genitori hanno avuto l’idea di darmi un sito WordPress personale, tutto mio. Cosi potevo usarlo, provare e riprovare, o fare quello che volevo. Nessuno di noi sapeva l’importanza che WordPress avrebbe nel mio futuro.

Il mio primo incontro con WordPress

Mentre gli aspetti tecnici del mio nuovo sito Web WordPress mi hanno incuriosita, ero più interessata nel fatto che ha creato uno spazio per scrivere.

Per tutta la mia infanzia soffrivo con dolore cronico, stanchezza e altri sintomi inspiegabili. Avere quel mondo privato che era tutto mio, avevo la possibilità di scrivere la mia storia. E c’è qualcosa di veramente potente nell’avere un posto dove raccontare la tua storia.

Quando i medici ed infermieri, nei migliori ospedali facevano fatica a trovare risposte per me e per i miei genitori, mi sentivo come se la mia vita e il mio mondo fossero fuori controllo. Ma l’accesso al mio piccolo sito web e la digitazione sui tasti del computer mi dava semrpre un senso di controllo. Non riuscivo a fare tante cose che gli altri ragazzi riuscivano a fare. Ma potevo perdermi nella scrittura per ore ed ore. Non potevo controllare la storia della mia vita, ma la potevo scrivere.

Era come scrivere lettere al mio sé futuro, “Guarda cos’hai passato, guarda quanto eri forte”. E anche ora, quando torno a scrivere lì, mi sento come se stessi scrivendo lettere alla persona che ero nel passato, “Guardati, guarda come ce l’hai fatta”.

WordPress nel mondo reale

Giuro che pensavo che una volta cresciuta, sarei stata in buona salute. Ho pensato che la “malasanità” fosse una parte dell’essere una bambina. Qualcosa di fastidioso come andare a dormire ad una certa ora, o dover mangiare le carote. E come la maggior parte dei bambini, non vedevo l’ora di crescere per poter stare sveglia fino a tardi, non mangiare mai più le carote e poi— essere sana.

Ma crescere non ha cambiato niente. In effetti, la mia salute continuava a peggiorare lentamente con il passare degli anni. Mi è stata finalmente diagnosticata la sclerosi multipla, dieci anni dopo, quando avevo 18 anni.

Mi sono resa conto che non potevo gestire un orario di lavoro a tempo pieno, non riuscivo nemmeno a guidare certi giorni (ringrazio mia mamma per avermi accompagnata tantissime volte al lavoro), e sapevo in fondo che avrei dovuto trovare un altro modo per lavorare.

Ho iniziato a scrivere recensioni di libri e musica online. Ho scritto vari post per diversi blog. A volte venivo anche pagata. WordPress per me era familiare, digitare sui tasti del computer era comodo, e condividere le mie parole con il mondo era surreale. Penso che a quel tempo credevo che WordPress fosse solo mio in un certo senso. Ma stavo imparando che WordPress è qualcosa che in un modo o l’altro appartiene a tutti. E adoravo questo fatto.

Il mio lavoro WordPress presso Valet

La cosa che amo di WordPress è che non è solo per sviluppatori del web, blogger o esperti sul SEO. Ho iniziato a conoscere sempre più persone nella comunità, e sono stata felice di trovare persone come me, che non conoscevano le cose tecniche, ma facevano comunque parte di WordPress.

C’erano i social media manager, e anche designer, c’era un posto per tutti. E la comunità veniva apprezzata tanto quanto il resto di tutto ciò che rende WordPress quello che è. Erano importanti le persone e le relazioni, proprio come erano importanti i codici ed i database.

Sono stata assunta da Valet nel 2020 grazie ai miei rapporti con le persone, in questo caso, mio ​​padre. Mi piace far parte di un’azienda WordPress e mi piace contribuire ad un team che aiuta le persone con i loro siti web. Capisco l’importanza di avere uno spazio che è tutto tuo. Che si tratti di un sito aziendale o personale, avere un sito web ti dà il potere di raccontare la tua storia.

Non dovevo lavorare a tempo pieno, o farmi accompagnare da mia madre al lavoro, non dovevo preoccuparmi dei giorni in cui riuscivo solo a stare in pigiama a letto. Ho un lavoro remoto al 100% che posso fare nonostante i colpi di scena nella mia storia.

Il Benvenuto nella comunità di WordPress

Kimberly Lipari è stata la prima persona a dirmi piu volte che facevo davvero parte della comunità di WordPress. Sembrava irreale. Non ero uno sviluppatore web, non so costruire un sito, eppure posso farne parte? Mi sentivo come se fossi un’intrusa nella comunità. Ma lei continua a ricordarmi che non sono un’intrusa, posso rimanere qui, ho un posto e uno spazio tutto mio qui.

Quando Michelle Frechette mi ha detto che potevo contribuire a Big Orange Heart, ero così contenta e sorpresa. Posso scrivevo le mie parole, pezzi della mia storia, e li posso condividere con una comunità di persone carissime.

E quando Topher mi ha contattato per scrivere la mia storia di WordPress per HeroPress, potevo solo dire di sì.

Potrei andare avanti all’infinito, questa comunità non è perfetta, ma tutti qui lavorano costantemente per diventare sempre migliori.

La mia storia di WordPress

Sono grata di condividere la mia storia con voi oggi.

Spero che forse possa essere una lettera a chiunque pensa come pensavo io, “Non ce la farò”.

Spero che ricorderà a chiunque legga questo articolo che WordPress è per tutti. Sano o no, sviluppatore o no, blogger o no, WordPress appartiene anche a te.

Spero soprattutto che la mia storia possa in qualche modo possa ricordare a tutti che ognuno ha una storia, ed ogni storia ha importanza e valore infinita.

The post How WordPress Made Space For Me As A Kid Who Grew Up With MS – Come WordPress Mi Ha Accolta Quando Ero Una Bambina Crescendo Con La Sclerosi Multipla appeared first on HeroPress.

HeroPress: How WordPress Made Space For Me As A Kid Who Grew Up With MS – Come WordPress Mi Ha Accolta Quando Ero Una Bambina Crescendo Con La Sclerosi Multipla

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 03/10/2021 - 09:05

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I was first introduced to WordPress when I was 13 years old. My parents had the idea to give me my very own WordPress website. I was able to use, play, test, and try whatever I wanted with it.

My First Encounter With WordPress

While the technical aspects of my new WordPress website intrigued me, I was more interested in the space it made for me to write. All throughout my childhood I had struggled with chronic pain, fatigue, and other unexplained symptoms. Having a private world I could call my own, I was able to write my story.

And there is something truly amazing about having a place to tell your story.

When doctors, nurses, specialists, and the best hospitals I could go to struggled to find answers for me and my parents, I felt like my life and world were out of control. But logging onto my little website and typing away on the computer keys gave me a sense of control. I couldn’t always do things that other kids had the energy to do. But I could get lost in writing for hours. I couldn’t control my life story, but I could write about it.

It felt like writing letters to my future self, “Look at what you went through, look how strong you were.” And even now, when I go on, I feel like I’m writing letters to my past self, “Look at you, look how you made it.”

WordPress In The Real World

I swear I thought that when I grew up, that I’d be healthy. I thought that “unhealthiness” was a part of being a kid. Something as terrible as having a bedtime, or having to eat carrots.

And like most kids, I couldn’t wait to be a grown up so that I could stay up as late as I wanted, never eat carrots again, and— be healthy.

But growing up didn’t change that. In fact, my condition grew slowly worse as years went by. I was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, a decade later at 18 years old.

I realized that I couldn’t handle a 9-5 work schedule, I couldn’t drive to a job on some days (shout-out to my mom for driving me) and I knew deep down that I would need to find another way to work.

I began writing music and book reviews online. I wrote blog posts. They were getting published and I was getting paid too. WordPress felt familiar, typing on the computer keys felt comfortable, and sharing my words with the world felt surreal.

I think I believed WordPress was mine somehow. I was learning that WordPress is something that belongs to everyone in some way. And I loved it.

My WordPress Job at Valet

The thing I love about WordPress is that it’s not just for developers or bloggers or SEO experts. I began to meet more people in the community and was delighted to find people like me, who didn’t know the technical stuff, but were a part of WordPress.

There were social media managers, there were designers, there was a place for everyone. And the community felt as important as the rest of everything that makes WordPress what it is. It felt like it was about people and relationships as well as codes and databases.

I was hired at Valet in 2020 thanks to my relationships with people, in this case, my very own dad.

I like being a part of a WordPress company, and I love that I contribute to a team that helps people with their websites. I understand the importance of having a space that’s yours. Whether it’s a business or personal site, having a website gives you the power of telling your own story.

I didn’t have to work 9-5 jobs, or have my mom drive me to work, I didn’t have to worry about days when I needed to just stay in sweats. I have a 100% remote job which I can do despite the plot twists in my story, thanks to WordPress and the people in it.

Welcomed Into The WordPress Community

Kimberly Lipari was the first person to repeatedly tell me that I was really indeed a part of the WordPress community. It felt unreal. I wasn’t a dev, I don’t know how to code, and yet I got to be a part of it all? I felt like I was a fake. But she continues to remind me that I’m real, I get to be here, I get to stay, I have a place.

When Michelle Frechette told me I could contribute to Big Orange Heart, I was honored. I was typing my words, pieces of my story, and sharing them with a community of people.

And when Topher contacted me to write my WordPress Story for HeroPress I could only say yes.

I could go on and on, this community is not perfect, but everyone here is constantly working to be better and do better.

My WordPress Story

I’m proud and grateful to be sharing my story today.

I hope that maybe it can be a letter to anyone out there thinking, “I won’t make it.”

I hope that it will remind anyone reading this that WordPress is a space for everyone. Healthy or not, developer or not, blogger or not— WordPress belongs to you too.

I hope most of all that my story can somehow remind you that your story is important.

Come WordPress Mi Ha Accolta Quando Ero Una Bambina Crescendo Con La Sclerosi Multipla

Sono stata introdotta a WordPress per la prima volta quando avevo 13 anni. I miei genitori hanno avuto l’idea di darmi un sito WordPress personale, tutto mio. Cosi potevo usarlo, provare e riprovare, o fare quello che volevo. Nessuno di noi sapeva l’importanza che WordPress avrebbe nel mio futuro.

Il mio primo incontro con WordPress

Mentre gli aspetti tecnici del mio nuovo sito Web WordPress mi hanno incuriosita, ero più interessata nel fatto che ha creato uno spazio per scrivere.

Per tutta la mia infanzia soffrivo con dolore cronico, stanchezza e altri sintomi inspiegabili. Avere quel mondo privato che era tutto mio, avevo la possibilità di scrivere la mia storia. E c’è qualcosa di veramente potente nell’avere un posto dove raccontare la tua storia.

Quando i medici ed infermieri, nei migliori ospedali facevano fatica a trovare risposte per me e per i miei genitori, mi sentivo come se la mia vita e il mio mondo fossero fuori controllo. Ma l’accesso al mio piccolo sito web e la digitazione sui tasti del computer mi dava semrpre un senso di controllo. Non riuscivo a fare tante cose che gli altri ragazzi riuscivano a fare. Ma potevo perdermi nella scrittura per ore ed ore. Non potevo controllare la storia della mia vita, ma la potevo scrivere.

Era come scrivere lettere al mio sé futuro, “Guarda cos’hai passato, guarda quanto eri forte”. E anche ora, quando torno a scrivere lì, mi sento come se stessi scrivendo lettere alla persona che ero nel passato, “Guardati, guarda come ce l’hai fatta”.

WordPress nel mondo reale

Giuro che pensavo che una volta cresciuta, sarei stata in buona salute. Ho pensato che la “malasanità” fosse una parte dell’essere una bambina. Qualcosa di fastidioso come andare a dormire ad una certa ora, o dover mangiare le carote. E come la maggior parte dei bambini, non vedevo l’ora di crescere per poter stare sveglia fino a tardi, non mangiare mai più le carote e poi— essere sana.

Ma crescere non ha cambiato niente. In effetti, la mia salute continuava a peggiorare lentamente con il passare degli anni. Mi è stata finalmente diagnosticata la sclerosi multipla, dieci anni dopo, quando avevo 18 anni.

Mi sono resa conto che non potevo gestire un orario di lavoro a tempo pieno, non riuscivo nemmeno a guidare certi giorni (ringrazio mia mamma per avermi accompagnata tantissime volte al lavoro), e sapevo in fondo che avrei dovuto trovare un altro modo per lavorare.

Ho iniziato a scrivere recensioni di libri e musica online. Ho scritto vari post per diversi blog. A volte venivo anche pagata. WordPress per me era familiare, digitare sui tasti del computer era comodo, e condividere le mie parole con il mondo era surreale. Penso che a quel tempo credevo che WordPress fosse solo mio in un certo senso. Ma stavo imparando che WordPress è qualcosa che in un modo o l’altro appartiene a tutti. E adoravo questo fatto.

Il mio lavoro WordPress presso Valet

La cosa che amo di WordPress è che non è solo per sviluppatori del web, blogger o esperti sul SEO. Ho iniziato a conoscere sempre più persone nella comunità, e sono stata felice di trovare persone come me, che non conoscevano le cose tecniche, ma facevano comunque parte di WordPress.

C’erano i social media manager, e anche designer, c’era un posto per tutti. E la comunità veniva apprezzata tanto quanto il resto di tutto ciò che rende WordPress quello che è. Erano importanti le persone e le relazioni, proprio come erano importanti i codici ed i database.

Sono stata assunta da Valet nel 2020 grazie ai miei rapporti con le persone, in questo caso, mio ​​padre. Mi piace far parte di un’azienda WordPress e mi piace contribuire ad un team che aiuta le persone con i loro siti web. Capisco l’importanza di avere uno spazio che è tutto tuo. Che si tratti di un sito aziendale o personale, avere un sito web ti dà il potere di raccontare la tua storia.

Non dovevo lavorare a tempo pieno, o farmi accompagnare da mia madre al lavoro, non dovevo preoccuparmi dei giorni in cui riuscivo solo a stare in pigiama a letto. Ho un lavoro remoto al 100% che posso fare nonostante i colpi di scena nella mia storia.

Il Benvenuto nella comunità di WordPress

Kimberly Lipari è stata la prima persona a dirmi piu volte che facevo davvero parte della comunità di WordPress. Sembrava irreale. Non ero uno sviluppatore web, non so costruire un sito, eppure posso farne parte? Mi sentivo come se fossi un’intrusa nella comunità. Ma lei continua a ricordarmi che non sono un’intrusa, posso rimanere qui, ho un posto e uno spazio tutto mio qui.

Quando Michelle Frechette mi ha detto che potevo contribuire a Big Orange Heart, ero così contenta e sorpresa. Posso scrivevo le mie parole, pezzi della mia storia, e li posso condividere con una comunità di persone carissime.

E quando Topher mi ha contattato per scrivere la mia storia di WordPress per HeroPress, potevo solo dire di sì.

Potrei andare avanti all’infinito, questa comunità non è perfetta, ma tutti qui lavorano costantemente per diventare sempre migliori.

La mia storia di WordPress

Sono grata di condividere la mia storia con voi oggi.

Spero che forse possa essere una lettera a chiunque pensa come pensavo io, “Non ce la farò”.

Spero che ricorderà a chiunque legga questo articolo che WordPress è per tutti. Sano o no, sviluppatore o no, blogger o no, WordPress appartiene anche a te.

Spero soprattutto che la mia storia possa in qualche modo possa ricordare a tutti che ognuno ha una storia, ed ogni storia ha importanza e valore infinita.

The post How WordPress Made Space For Me As A Kid Who Grew Up With MS – Come WordPress Mi Ha Accolta Quando Ero Una Bambina Crescendo Con La Sclerosi Multipla appeared first on HeroPress.

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