Wordpress News

Dev Blog: Update on Gutenberg

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 07/06/2018 - 19:23

Progress on the Gutenberg project, the new content creating experience coming to WordPress, has come a long way. Since the start of the project, there have been 30 releases and 12 of those happened after WordCamp US 2017. In total, there have been 1,764 issues opened and 1,115 closed. As the work on phase one moves into its final stretch, here is what you can expect.

In Progress
  • Freeze new features in Gutenberg (the feature list can be found here).
  • Hosts, agencies, teachers invited to opt-in sites they have influence over.
  • WordPress.com has opt-in for wp-admin users. The number of sites and posts will be tracked.
  • Mobile app support for Gutenberg will be across iOS and Android.
July
  • 4.9.x release with an invitation to install either Gutenberg or Classic Editor plugin.
  • WordPress.com will move to opt-out. There will be tracking to see who opts out and why.
  • Triage increases and bug gardening escalates to get blockers in Gutenberg down to zero.
  • Gutenberg phase two, Customization exploration begins by moving beyond the post.
August and beyond
  • All critical issues within Gutenberg are resolved.
  • There is full integration with Calypso and there is opt-in for users there.
  • A goal will be 100k+ sites having made 250k+ posts using Gutenberg.
  • Core merge of Gutenberg begins the 5.0 release cycle.
  • 5.0 moves into beta releases and translations are completed.
  • There will be a mobile version of Gutenberg by the end of the year.

WordPress 5.0 could be as soon as August with hundreds of thousands of sites using Gutenberg before release. Learn more about Gutenberg here, take it for a test drive, install on your site, follow along on GitHub and give your feedback.

Update on Gutenberg

Wordpress News - Fri, 07/06/2018 - 19:23

Progress on the Gutenberg project, the new content creating experience coming to WordPress, has come a long way. Since the start of the project, there have been 30 releases and 12 of those happened after WordCamp US 2017. In total, there have been 1,764 issues opened and 1,115 closed as of WordCamp Europe. As the work on phase one moves into its final stretch, here is what you can expect.

In Progress
  • Freeze new features in Gutenberg (the feature list can be found here).
  • Hosts, agencies, teachers invited to opt-in sites they have influence over.
  • WordPress.com has opt-in for wp-admin users. The number of sites and posts will be tracked.
  • Mobile app support for Gutenberg will be across iOS and Android.
July
  • 4.9.x release with an invitation to install either Gutenberg or Classic Editor plugin.
  • WordPress.com will move to opt-out. There will be tracking to see who opts out and why.
  • Triage increases and bug gardening escalates to get blockers in Gutenberg down to zero.
  • Gutenberg phase two, Customization exploration begins by moving beyond the post.
August and beyond
  • All critical issues within Gutenberg are resolved.
  • There is full integration with Calypso and there is opt-in for users there.
  • A goal will be 100k+ sites having made 250k+ posts using Gutenberg.
  • Core merge of Gutenberg begins the 5.0 release cycle.
  • 5.0 moves into beta releases and translations are completed.
  • There will be a mobile version of Gutenberg by the end of the year.

WordPress 5.0 could be as soon as August with hundreds of thousands of sites using Gutenberg before release. Learn more about Gutenberg here, take it for a test drive, install on your site, follow along on GitHub and give your feedback.

WPTavern: WordPress 4.9.8 to Introduce “Try Gutenberg” Callout

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 07/05/2018 - 21:39

Paul Biron and Joshua Wold are leading the upcoming WordPress 4.9.8 release, which was originally announced as 4.9.7. WordPress core contributors met yesterday to decide the general focus and set the release schedule. In the meantime, the 4.9.7 security and maintenance release was rolled out to fix an authenticated arbitrary file deletion vulnerability, along with a few other minor updates.

WordPress 4.9.8 is targeted for July 31, 2018, with a beta as early as July 17. The release will focus on introducing the “Try Gutenberg” callout and adding privacy fixes and enhancements. The ticket proposing the callout was opened a year ago and was planned to be included in WordPress 4.9.5 but was eventually pulled before the release in favor of allowing Gutenberg contributors to iron out a few important issues.

WordPress Core Committer Mel Choyce added the most recent round of designs to the ticket four weeks ago and contributors are still iterating on the design and text for the callout. Another iteration is expected to be added to the ticket early next week.

WordPress 4.9.8 is another step in Matt Mullenweg’s roadmap for getting Gutenberg into 5.0. The goal is to make more users aware of Gutenberg and to gather more testing and feedback before the new editor lands in core. The prompt will include a prominent button that users can click to install the Gutenberg plugin, along with links for where to learn more and how to report issues.

WPTavern: Just Write: A Client-Side React App for Writing and Editing WordPress Posts

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 07/05/2018 - 18:09

WordPress developer Jason Bobich has created an open source client-side React app called Just Write that provides a decoupled editing experience for WordPress. Bobich said he built the app in 10 days to explore the possibilities of React and the WP REST API.

Although it’s still a work in progress, the app has a demo where curious testers can manage posts from any WordPress website that’s secured with HTTPS and has the JWT Authentication plugin installed. Alternatively, testers can click on the “play in the sandbox” to bypass authentication.

Once logged in, the user sees a dashboard with the most recent posts, a deliberate design decision that Bobich made to “motivate the user to do one thing – to just write.”

The editor includes support for Markdown and a simple preview with a sticky toolbar at the top. Just Write also allows the user to edit their profile and personal information in a dropdown at the top of the screen.

Bobich said he created to the app to improve his JavaScript skills and doesn’t have a plan to use it for business.

“Ever since we were all told a couple of years ago, ‘Learn JavaScript deeply,’ I’ve seen just how many holes I had in my own JavaScript knowledge,” Bobich said. “I’ve been working hard the last couple of years to become more than just a jQuery monkey. And so this project is just another step towards my personal growth surrounding the technologies involved here. It’s so exciting to think about the potential things that we can build in the community with React and the WordPress API.”

WP REST API Currently Poses Complicated Hurdles for App Developers

After the REST API was merged into core, the time seemed ripe for developers to build a proliferation of different writing experiences for users. However, working with the API still has many hurdles for application developers, limitations that Bobich said he became acquainted with while developing Just Write.

“For anyone wanting to build a practical application like this, the first glaring issue is around authentication,” Bobich said. “WordPress has no way to securely authenticate from outside of the WordPress admin. So expecting any average user to set up oAuth or JWT with a third-party plugin is a bit of a reach.”

Bobich also encountered issues working with media and saving content the WordPress way (which allows shortcodes to get parsed before wpautop()). The application is not yet ready for real, practical use but would require even more API calls to do things like get ahold of categories and tags or add the ability to create new ones.

“Think about all the work WordPress has put into the way we embed media in different ways,” Bobich said. “Just having basic things we take for granted — pasting a YouTube link, a tweet, uploading an image and having it cropped 100 ways ’til Sunday — for all work properly would all take custom JavaScript coding.”

Bobich said he thinks these limitations are the reason why there aren’t yet more applications built with decoupled editing experiences. Yet, in the new era of Gutenberg, Just Write’s alternative writing interface offers a simplicity that some users may prefer.

“As the WordPress admin continues to grow and become more complex, some people get excited and others moan and grown,” Bobich said. “But building something like Just Write shows us that there’s more to WordPress than just what we see. There’s more than a menu full of plugins and a new editor built in React that we may or may not like. WordPress can be what we want. It can fit our own needs or any client’s. And this all comes from the potential ability to decouple the editing experience.”

As WordPress has evolved to accommodate different user types from blogging, websites, and niche applications, Bobich said he thinks the next logical step is for developers to begin creating admin interfaces catered specifically to users’ individual needs.

“Gutenberg marks an important turn in the evolution,” Bobich said. “For those that were clinging to the simplicity of WordPress and blocking out some of the other noise, this might not be something they end up liking… or maybe it will?

“But the bigger point is that what we see there in the admin doesn’t have to be it. I hope people will be braver than me and really set out to build these different alternatives. If I can polish my React skills and build that myself in 10 days, I can only imagine what others can do.”

Dev Blog: WordPress 4.9.7 Security and Maintenance Release

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 07/05/2018 - 17:00

WordPress 4.9.7 is now available. This is a security and maintenance release for all versions since WordPress 3.7. We strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately.

WordPress versions 4.9.6 and earlier are affected by a media issue that could potentially allow a user with certain capabilities to attempt to delete files outside the uploads directory.

Thank you to Slavco for reporting the original issue and Matt Barry for reporting related issues.

Seventeen other bugs were fixed in WordPress 4.9.7. Particularly of note were:

  • Taxonomy: Improve cache handling for term queries.
  • Posts, Post Types: Clear post password cookie when logging out.
  • Widgets: Allow basic HTML tags in sidebar descriptions on Widgets admin screen.
  • Community Events Dashboard: Always show the nearest WordCamp if one is coming up, even if there are multiple Meetups happening first.
  • Privacy: Make sure default privacy policy content does not cause a fatal error when flushing rewrite rules outside of the admin context.

Download WordPress 4.9.7 or venture over to Dashboard → Updates and click “Update Now.” Sites that support automatic background updates are already beginning to update automatically.

The previously scheduled 4.9.7 is now referred to as 4.9.8, and will follow the release schedule posted yesterday.

Thank you to everyone who contributed to WordPress 4.9.7:

1naveengiri, Aaron Jorbin, abdullahramzan, alejandroxlopez, Andrew Ozz, Arun, Birgir Erlendsson (birgire), BjornW, Boone Gorges, Brandon Kraft, Chetan Prajapati, David Herrera, Felix Arntz, Gareth, Ian Dunn, ibelanger, John Blackbourn, Jonathan Desrosiers, Joy, khaihong, lbenicio, Leander Iversen, mermel, metalandcoffee, Migrated to @jeffpaul, palmiak, Sergey Biryukov, skoldin, Subrata Sarkar, Towhidul Islam, warmlaundry, and YuriV.

WordPress 4.9.7 Security and Maintenance Release

Wordpress News - Thu, 07/05/2018 - 17:00

WordPress 4.9.7 is now available. This is a security and maintenance release for all versions since WordPress 3.7. We strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately.

WordPress versions 4.9.6 and earlier are affected by a media issue that could potentially allow a user with certain capabilities to attempt to delete files outside the uploads directory.

Thank you to Slavco for reporting the original issue and Matt Barry for reporting related issues.

Seventeen other bugs were fixed in WordPress 4.9.7. Particularly of note were:

  • Taxonomy: Improve cache handling for term queries.
  • Posts, Post Types: Clear post password cookie when logging out.
  • Widgets: Allow basic HTML tags in sidebar descriptions on Widgets admin screen.
  • Community Events Dashboard: Always show the nearest WordCamp if one is coming up, even if there are multiple Meetups happening first.
  • Privacy: Make sure default privacy policy content does not cause a fatal error when flushing rewrite rules outside of the admin context.

Download WordPress 4.9.7 or venture over to Dashboard → Updates and click “Update Now.” Sites that support automatic background updates are already beginning to update automatically.

The previously scheduled 4.9.7 is now referred to as 4.9.8, and will follow the release schedule posted yesterday.

Thank you to everyone who contributed to WordPress 4.9.7:

1naveengiri, Aaron Jorbin, abdullahramzan, alejandroxlopez, Andrew Ozz, Arun, Birgir Erlendsson (birgire), BjornW, Boone Gorges, Brandon Kraft, Chetan Prajapati, David Herrera, Felix Arntz, Gareth, Ian Dunn, ibelanger, John Blackbourn, Jonathan Desrosiers, Joy, khaihong, lbenicio, Leander Iversen, mermel, metalandcoffee, Migrated to @jeffpaul, palmiak, Sergey Biryukov, skoldin, Subrata Sarkar, Towhidul Islam, warmlaundry, and YuriV.

SimpleBlog

Drupal Themes - Wed, 07/04/2018 - 20:52

Simple Blog is a new and clean, grid responsive Drupal 8 theme on the web.
This theme can be used for drupal 8 to create your powerful blogging website with grid layout.

Features:

  • Responsive Blog
  • Simple clean design
  • Grid Layout (Masonry grid layout library)
  • With/without Grid Layout using Configuration
  • Supports 3-columns layout

Future Release :

  • Dropdown menu.

HeroPress: Coding under trees and in 24 hour coffee shops

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 07/04/2018 - 18:30

People were paying me to write code two years before I had wifi in my house. Home wifi would have cost $45 a month. The cable company wanted a $100 deposit to create my account. It wasn’t going to happen, I could get wifi with a cup of coffee for $3 (including the tip) at a coffee shop a few blocks away from my place that meant I got some semblance of being social. I couldn’t imagine giving up 15 days a month at coffee shops just so it was easier to work from home, not when I could get away with sitting on my porch poaching wifi from my neighbors when I got stuck and had to google regular expressions for the 400th time. Or, my favorite, sit in a park down the street where there were three unprotected wifi networks and a strong tree to lean against.

My path to becoming a web developer started when I packed up my beat up Chevy Prizm and drove to Portland, Oregon. I had graduated college with degrees in Economics and Political Science. While there, I become a Linux user when I discovered that it used less space meaning I had more space for music. I had never written code, but when my friends and I decided we wanted to create our version of The Onion, I started searching. After a little bit of trial ( blogger ) and error ( blogger ), I found WordPress and it’s “Famous Five Minute Install”. I purchased a domain and hosting from a place that advertised heavily and set about creating our site.

The public library was my initial source of information. After all, having fun isn’t hard when you’ve got a library card. I picked up books on CSS, PHP, Java, Database design, and anything I could get my hands on. I was working evenings as an usher for the Portland Trailblazers and would head over to a 24 hour coffee shop to cowboy code under fluorescent lights until I was ready to crash.

I can think of three big breaks that really helped move me along. Each of these ended up being “Flash Forward” moments where I was able to grow.

My First Client

I was scouring craigslist looking for anything I could get my hands on when I found someone offering $25 to move their WordPress site from one domain to another. Having just done that, I sent an email and crossed my fingers. Somehow, my eagerness (and likely willingness to work for peanuts) got my their trust. I had my first client. It took me way longer than I would have hoped as I learned about things like DNS Propagation, but I completed the task. And did such a good job that I was asked if I could build a website for one of their friends who was a standup comic. I was honest that I had never built a real site from scratch, but they liked how I had communicated, so I got the gig.

My First Core Experience

Before the first time I contributed to WordPress, I went to the Portland WordPress User Group to ask if something I was seeing was possibly an issue that warranted emailing the wp-hackers mailing list. I was so scared of being wrong that I felt like I needed to ask permission. I assumed that I was going to make a fool of myself and be laughed at. I ended up emailing the list and it turned out, I had found a spot where WordPress could be better! In the grand scheme of WordPress, passing a parameter to three `do_action` calls didn’t help WordPress gain 1% of market share, but it did help me with the plugin I was working on. And I was exposed to the process. I learned about trac, and the weekly devchat, and patches and svn. While I didn’t get props, I still consider this my first contribution to WordPress Core.

My first WordCamp

WordCamps are cheap compared to most tech conferences, but when you are playing the game of “How do I eat on $10 a week” for months on end, $40 for a conference whose value is unknown is a hard sell. Luckily, the Portland WordPress User Group did a raffle for a ticket and I won. All I had to pay for was the $2 in bus fare each way and I had the chance to learn. The 2009 WordCamp Portland ended up being where Matt Mullenweg announced that WPMU was going to be merged into core in WordPress 3.0 and it’s where I saw a talk entitled “How Not to Build a WordPress Plugin” by Will Norris. Will’s talk exposed me to WordPress development in a way that I would never have imagined on my own. It helped me level up from someone who mostly was copy and pasting PHP to someone who was writing code.

Additionally, I was able to network for the first time. It no longer was the same 15 people who went to the meetup, it was now about 200 WordPress fanatics, many who wanted to hire someone like me to work on their website!

Looking back, these flash forward moments contributed almost as much to luck to my success. In many ways, a lot of my success can be attributed to the luck of being born as someone who is essentially a white cis-male into a family where I was exposed to computers and had a chance to gain a solid liberal arts education.

But it’s not just that luck that helped me. I had to provide good customer service to turn a $25 task into a contract to build my first website. I had to be willing to embarrass myself by asking what I thought was a dumb question. I had to show up and become a part of my local community to get a ticket for a conference where I learned and networked.

Soon after WordCamp Portland 2009, I had enough client work coming in that it made sense to have wifi. Home wifi meant I could start being connected to the WordPress community more than once a month in person or a few hours here and there at coffee shops. It meant I could read dev chat every week and eventually it meant I could earn props. Networking at meetups, WordCamps and conferences led to full time jobs. Taking risks and being willing to look like a fool in front of the WordPress community have enabled me to become a WordPress Core committer (and sometimes continue to look like a fool). In addition to volunteering on WordPress Core, I’m now the Director of Editorial Technology for Penske Media Corporation where I help brands like Rolling Stone and Variety run on WordPress, but I’ll never forget when if I needed to code, I was going to sit under trees in parks or the fluorescent lights of a 24 hour coffee shop.

The post Coding under trees and in 24 hour coffee shops appeared first on HeroPress.

WPTavern: WordCamp Incubator Program 2018 to Host Events in Montevideo, Uruguay and Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 07/03/2018 - 03:41
The Pocitos neighborhood of Montevideo, Uruguay. Skyline from the shore -photo credit: Rimbaldine

The WordCamp Incubator Program has selected Montevideo, Uruguay and Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia to host WordCamps in 2018. The program provides a jump start for new WordPress communities where meetups have not yet been well-established. Montevideo and Kota Kinabalu were selected from a short list of 14 communities that had been whittled down from 104 applications for the program.

WordPress Community Deputies will co-lead the events and mentor a local team that will organize a one-track WordCamp with approximately 50-75 attendees. The goal is to empower the new organizers and the fledgling communities to host more local events, ideally regular meetups and an annual WordCamp. Mentors will assist in finding speakers and sponsors. A global sponsorship grant will cover 100% of the events’ costs, relieving the organizers of the burden of local fundraising.

WordPress Community Team member Rocío Valdivia announced the program’s new cities for 2018 and said she anticipates the events will happen in the last quarter of this year. Local co-leads have been charged with starting a monthly meetup group before setting a date for the new WordCamps.

Round 2 of the WordCamp Incubator Program follows up a successful run in 2016 that brought WordCamps to Denpasar, Harare, and Medellín. Harare hosted its second WordCamp in 2017 and a 2018 camp is in the early planning stages. This particular African community, along with the neighboring Nairobi community (on the short list in 2016), are strong examples of how the incubator program can provide a boost in areas of the world where the WordPress community is not yet deeply rooted.

WPTavern: Block Unit Test Plugin Helps WordPress Theme Developers Prepare for Gutenberg

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 07/02/2018 - 21:43

ThemeBeans founder Rich Tabor has released a new plugin called Block Unit Test for Gutenberg that helps theme authors test their themes for Gutenberg-readiness. It is similar to the Theme Unit Test but is limited to testing Gutenberg blocks.

After installing and activating both Gutenberg and sBlock Unit Test, the plugin creates a new page as a draft with an example of every core Gutenblock. This makes it easy to see how the blocks will appear on the frontend of any theme. Block Unit Test also includes variations on the core blocks with different alignment and column settings applied.

Tabor said he knew it would be advantageous to start using/writing in Gutenberg daily to better understand what he needed to do to make his products at ThemeBeans compatible.

“I added initial support for Gutenberg in my Tabor WordPress theme, as I use it on my own personal blog with Gutenberg,” he said. “I needed a way to easily test each of the core Gutenberg blocks (and eventually third-party blocks) without having to manually add them every time I wanted to test something. As Gutenberg blocks get more dynamic and complicated, it’s a bit trickier to test for – as many blocks have different variations/styles/columns/grids/etc.”

Tabor took inspiration from the Theme Unit Test and created Block Unit Test with Gutenblock variations included. He is using the plugin while preparing the 20+ themes in his ThemeBeans catalog to support Gutenberg. He wrote the plugin to be extensible and made it open source on GitHub for other developers and theme shops to use.

Theme developers can install Block Unit Test as a first step towards making sure the front-end styles match the editor styles. This will be essential to making the transition process easier for new Gutenberg users once WordPress 5.0 ships. Tabor also published a tutorial for adding WordPress Theme Styles to Gutenberg to help others get started.

In getting his first theme compatible, Tabor said he relied heavily on the Gutenberg Handbook, as well as following discussions on the Gutenberg GitHub repository.

“It’s not terribly difficult to add support for Gutenberg, although applying proper theme styles within the Gutenberg editor is a bit of task — there’s so much that can be accidentally overlooked,” Tabor said. “For the theme side of things, there wasn’t much technical leveling-up — though developing blocks is a different story. I did need to raise the bar and dive deeply into the world of Javascript, though looking at the block examples on the GitHub repository really helped me along.”

Tabor said he started “living and breathing all things Gutenberg” after WordCamp US 2017, and began writing development articles while learning the ropes. He created several projects focused on the new editor, including Writy, a Gutenberg-centric writing experience for publishers, and Co-Blocks, a beta suite of Gutenberg blocks for content marketers.

“As a founder of a theme shop it was apparent that I needed to hone in on Gutenberg and level-up my knowledge, technical skills, and consequently my products, in order to compete in a post-Gutenberg era of WordPress,” Tabor said.

“I believe the foundation of the future of WordPress lies in the success of Gutenberg. I use the new editor just about daily now. I know it’s a great move in the right direction and I’m doing my part to make sure folks using my themes can experience everything that Gutenberg has to offer.”

Dev Blog: The Month in WordPress: June 2018

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 07/02/2018 - 09:28

With one of the two flagship WordCamp events taking place this month, as well as some important WordPress project announcements, there’s no shortage of news. Learn more about what happened in the WordPress community in June.

Another Successful WordCamp Europe

On June 14th, WordCamp Europe kicked off three days of learning and contributions in Belgrade. Over 2,000 people attended in person, with hundreds more watching live streams of the sessions.

The WordCamp was a great success with plenty of first-time attendees and new WordPress contributors getting involved in the project and community. Recorded sessions from the 65 speakers at the event will be available on WordPress.tv in the coming weeks. In the meantime, check out the photos from the event.

The next WordCamp Europe takes place on June 20-22 2019 in Berlin, Germany. If you’re based in Europe and would like to serve on the organizing team, fill in the application form.

Updated Roadmap for the New WordPress Content Editor

During his keynote session at WordCamp Europe, Matt Mullenweg presented an updated roadmap for Gutenberg, the new content editor coming in WordPress 5.0.

While the editor is in rapid development, with v3.1 being released this past month, the team is aiming to ship Gutenberg with WordPress Core in August, 2018. This is not set in stone — the release date may shift as development progresses — but this gives the first realistic idea of when we can expect the editor to be released.

If you would like to contribute to Gutenberg, read the handbook, follow the Core team blog, and join the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

WordCamp Incubator Cities Announced

The WordCamp Incubator program helps spread WordPress to underserved communities by providing organizing support for their first WordCamp. The first iteration of this program ran successfully in 2016 and empowered three cities to start their own WordPress communities.

This year, the Community Team is running the Incubator program again. After receiving applications from 104 communities, they have selected Montevideo, Uruguay and Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia to participate in the program. Both cities will receive direct help from experienced WordCamp organizers to run their first-ever WordCamp as a way to help their WordPress community get started.

To find out more about the Incubator program follow the Community team blog, and join the #community-events channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

Further Reading:
  • The WordPress community of Spain recently received an award for being the best open-source community in the country.
  • This month, WordPress reached the milestone of powering 31% of websites.
  • WP Rig is a brand new tool to help WordPress developers build better themes.
  • Block Unit Test is a new plugin to help theme developers prepare for Gutenberg.
  • Near the end of the month, Zac Gordon hosted an online conference focused on JavaScript development in WordPress – the session videos will be available on YouTube soon.

If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.

The Month in WordPress: June 2018

Wordpress News - Mon, 07/02/2018 - 09:28

With one of the two flagship WordCamp events taking place this month, as well as some important WordPress project announcements, there’s no shortage of news. Learn more about what happened in the WordPress community in June.

Another Successful WordCamp Europe

On June 14th, WordCamp Europe kicked off three days of learning and contributions in Belgrade. Over 2,000 people attended in person, with hundreds more watching live streams of the sessions.

The WordCamp was a great success with plenty of first-time attendees and new WordPress contributors getting involved in the project and community. Recorded sessions from the 65 speakers at the event will be available on WordPress.tv in the coming weeks. In the meantime, check out the photos from the event.

The next WordCamp Europe takes place on June 20-22 2019 in Berlin, Germany. If you’re based in Europe and would like to serve on the organizing team, fill in the application form.

Updated Roadmap for the New WordPress Content Editor

During his keynote session at WordCamp Europe, Matt Mullenweg presented an updated roadmap for Gutenberg, the new content editor coming in WordPress 5.0.

While the editor is in rapid development, with v3.1 being released this past month, the team is aiming to ship Gutenberg with WordPress Core in August, 2018. This is not set in stone — the release date may shift as development progresses — but this gives the first realistic idea of when we can expect the editor to be released.

If you would like to contribute to Gutenberg, read the handbook, follow the Core team blog, and join the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

WordCamp Incubator Cities Announced

The WordCamp Incubator program helps spread WordPress to underserved communities by providing organizing support for their first WordCamp. The first iteration of this program ran successfully in 2016 and empowered three cities to start their own WordPress communities.

This year, the Community Team is running the Incubator program again. After receiving applications from 104 communities, they have selected Montevideo, Uruguay and Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia to participate in the program. Both cities will receive direct help from experienced WordCamp organizers to run their first-ever WordCamp as a way to help their WordPress community get started.

To find out more about the Incubator program follow the Community team blog, and join the #community-events channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

Further Reading:
  • The WordPress community of Spain recently received an award for being the best open-source community in the country.
  • This month, WordPress reached the milestone of powering 31% of websites.
  • WP Rig is a brand new tool to help WordPress developers build better themes.
  • Block Unit Test is a new plugin to help theme developers prepare for Gutenberg.
  • Near the end of the month, Zac Gordon hosted an online conference focused on JavaScript development in WordPress – the session videos will be available on YouTube soon.

If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.

Matt: Work and Play

Wordpress Planet - Sun, 07/01/2018 - 01:13

A master in the art of living draws no sharp distinction between his work and his play; his labor and his leisure; his mind and his body; his education and his recreation. He hardly knows which is which. He simply pursues his vision of excellence through whatever he is doing, and leaves others to determine whether he is working or playing. To himself, he always appears to be doing both.

Lawrence Pearsall Jacks in Education through Recreation, 1932

Post Status: An Abundance of Acquisitions — Draft Podcast

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 06/29/2018 - 22:11

Welcome to the Post Status Draft podcast, which you can find on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, and via RSS for your favorite podcatcher. Post Status Draft is hosted by Brian Krogsgard and co-host Brian Richards.

In this episode, the Brians have a chat about a number of different acquisitions that have occurred in the WordPress space over these past few weeks. Listen in as they unpack some of the news surrounding StudioPress, WPEngine, Automattic, WPNinjas, Prospress, and AutomateWoo. Check out our episode links for further stories about each of those businesses as well as the virtual JavaScript for WordPress conference taking place live on July 29.

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WPTavern: WCEU Panel Discusses Progressive WordPress Themes, AMP, and Gutenberg

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 06/29/2018 - 22:03

Progressive themes was a hot topic at WordCamp Europe 2018. During the event I had the opportunity to set up a panel with four experts who are working to integrate progressive web development practices more deeply in WordPress core, plugins, and themes. These practices make it possible for a website (or app) to work offline, load quickly, deliver content on unreliable networks, and use device-specific features to provide a better experience for the user. The PWA (progressive web app) created for WordCamp Europe is a good example of this in action.

Thierry Muller, Alberto Medina, Weston Ruter, and Morten Rand-Hendriksen joined me for an interview, exploring the future of WordPress themes in the era of progressive web development. (see video below)

“At the most abstract level, it’s all about user experience,” Medina said. “How do we maximize the pleasure that our users get when they use our websites? And delightfulness in this context means things like performance, speed, having content that isn’t blocked. If you think about themes built according to those principles, then we are basically seeking an awesome user experience in WordPress.”

It’s not yet clear what this will look like for the WordPress theme landscape, as current solutions are somewhat fragmented. WordPress contributors are working to standardize progressive technologies in core so the ecosystem can collaborate better together.

“There are many progressive themes being built these days,” Medina said. “One of the problems that is happening is that there is a lot of fragmentation. There’s a lot of plugins that are using service workers but in their own ways. What we want is to say, ‘This is the best way to do things,’ this is a uniform API to do it, and then enable progressive theme developers to take advantage of the core functionality.”

Currently, the prospect of setting up a WordPress site that uses progressive web technologies would be a daunting task for regular users, even if they are implementing existing solutions.

“There’s also a user aspect of it, because the people for whom we design WordPress, plugins, and themes, are the people who actually publish their own content onto the web,” Rand-Hendriksen said. “There’s a really valid question in how much should they need to know about how the web works to be able to publish some content. When they spin up a WordPress site, should we impose on them to know that they need to add all these optimization plugins and do all this other stuff just to make the site work properly? How much of that can be offloaded onto the theme itself, or plugins, or even WordPress core?”

The members of the panel are working together to on various projects and core contributions that will standardize the use of progressive enhancement technologies in WordPress.

“The goal is to have a common API for service workers so that plugins and themes can each install their own logic, just like they can enqueque their own scripts today,” Ruter said. “Also to be able to enqueue their own service workers and then core can manage the combination of them, as well as having a common app manifest that plugins and themes can collaborate on and have a single output into the page.”

This is how Rand-Hendriksen’s WP Rig starter theme project came about – to help developers take advantage of these best practices in the meantime, without having to figure out how to put all the pieces together.

“WP Rig gives you the platform to build a progressive theme that uses all the latest performance and WordPress best practices, in a convenient package, and over time it will evolve with these new progressive technologies,” Rand-Hendriksen said.

We also discussed AMP and Gutenberg compatibility, core support for web app manifests, and how the commercial theme industry will react to these new technologies. Check out the full interview in the video below.

WPTavern: WPWeekly Episode 322 – WP Engine Acquires StudioPress

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 06/29/2018 - 01:21

In this episode, John James Jacoby and I spend the first half of the show discussing WP Engine’s acquisition of StudioPress. We share reactions from social media, debate on whether it’s a good or bad thing for the WordPress ecosystem, and webhosts being at the top of the food chain.

We also talk about a recent security vulnerability that was publicly disclosed, ProsPress acquires AutomateWoo, and the release of Tide beta 1. Also of note, we identified an issue that causes John’s audio to turn into static. His audio should be fixed in the next episode.

Stories Discussed:

Why WP Engine is Acquiring StudioPress
An Important Announcement About the Future of StudioPress
WP Engine, a managed WordPress platform, raises $250M from Silver Lake
https://twitter.com/bgardner/status/1012011823279824901
AutomateWoo joins Prospress
AutomateWoo joins Prospress to Further eCommerce Automation on WooCommerce
Tide Beta 1 Released

WPWeekly Meta:

Next Episode: Wednesday, July 4th 3:00 P.M. Eastern

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Listen To Episode #322:

WPTavern: Drop It Plugin Brings Gifs and Unsplash Photos to Gutenberg

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 06/28/2018 - 22:52

If you’re writing all your posts in the new Gutenberg editor but don’t want to give up convenient access to your fancy gifs and stock images, the new Drop It plugin has you covered. Riad Benguella, one of the engineers who is working on Gutenberg, created the plugin to offer one-click image insertion/upload from Unsplash.com.

Drop It adds a droplet icon to the Gutenberg sidebar that launches a search form for Unsplash.com or Giphy.com (a feature contributed by Julien Maury). Users can click the “+” sign on the image or simply drag and drop it into the content area.

Drop It seamlessly connects Gutenberg to the Unsplash and Giphy libraries, putting hundreds of thousands of stock photos and gifs at your fingertips while composing in WordPress. In the earlier days of Unsplash, many of the same images were used all over the web, but over the past few years its library has grown to include more than 550,000 high-resolution photos.

Check out this demo to see how how fast it is to search and insert images:

Benguella originally created the plugin for a talk he gave at WPtech Lyon where he demonstrated how plugin developers can make use of Gutenberg’s reusable modules. His presentation and slides explore Gutenberg’s architecture and show how he created the Drop It plugin.

Benguella said the Drop It plugin’s code is a good example of how developers can extend Gutenberg’s UI using “pinnable” sidebar plugins. It also shows how to use the Data module to access and update Gutenberg’s state (data).

In the future, Benguella plans to add more sources for inserting media. He currently has a proof of concept for adding content from Google Docs and will add more depending on contributions from others and his availability to work on the plugin.

Matt: Automattic’s First New Board Member: General Ann Dunwoody

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 06/28/2018 - 19:54

As Automattic keeps growing we’ve been bringing in a lot of talented people behind the scenes to help expand on our vision as we go from hundreds to thousands of colleagues, and hundreds of millions to billions in revenue. Recently, former New York Times digital executive Kinsey Wilson joined our team as president of WordPress.com, the Chief Design Officer of Axios Alexis Lloyd has joined as head of Design Innovation, the former CEO of Bluehost James Grierson, and today I’m excited to announce a change to my bosses, the board of directors.

Gen. Ann Dunwoody served for 37 years in the U.S. Army, and she is the first woman in U.S. Military history to achieve a four-star officer rank. She’s also the author of A Higher Standard: Leadership Strategies from America’s First Female Four-Star General, a book I really loved and highly recommend. Automattic’s board has had no new members since its founding in 2005, so this is our first addition in 13 years. I became familiar with General Dunwoody’s work while researching distributed organizations outside of technology, which led me to the military, which led me to geek out on logistics, which led me to her book and eventually flying out to Florida to meet in person.

Below is a brief interview with Gen. Dunwoody — we chatted with her about global leadership, finding your passion, and building a business.

We’re excited to have you onboard, General Dunwoody. It’s interesting — at Automattic we like to point out that we’re all over the globe (over 740 employees in more than 60 countries) but you oversaw 69,000 military and civilians across 140 countries! Were there any big leadership lessons from managing operations across such a wide range of distances, timezones, and cultures?

That’s a great question. When I started out as a young officer in the Army, the leadership philosophy that was espoused back then was “Leadership by walking around.” When you’re in charge of a platoon, a company or even a battalion or Brigade that is not globally dispersed this philosophy is very sound. When you’re running a global organization with 69,000 folks in 140 countries, you have to leverage technology to keep real-time communications flowing and keep leaders updated. I would host (with the leadership) a global video teleconference every Wednesday connecting every organization from Afghanistan, Kuwait, Iraq, Europe, etc. and sites — hundreds across the United States. Our headquarters  would provide an operational update and then we go around the globe to get update from from everyone — what’s going well, where they need help or additional resources. In the old days I think people believed information was power and often withheld information to use for personal advantage, but I believe shared information is power. By leveraging the power of the entire industrial base we could solve problems in real time. I still travelled around a lot to see our people, but it is not possible to keep everyone informed and in the loop with current operations without leveraging technology.

I love your answer about “shared information is power.” Did you ever find it difficult to break down the silos and embrace that concept?

Oh my, yes. They weren’t just silos, they were silos with concertina wire around them!   Parochialism was rampant and everyone wanted their own system and own their own information. We had over 200 stand alone systems that didn’t talk to each other. So to field and design an enterprise IT system that leveraged systems with the needed information to support “foxhole to factory” was challenging and exciting.

And how did you decide what technological means to communicate an idea or a directive, versus, say, meeting in-person?

I would say it depended on the idea. If it was personal, probably a phone call (one on one); if trying to generate support for an idea or transformational concept, meet in-person with my initiatives group to socialize the idea and get their input modifications and buy-in. Then Commanders conference to socialize idea with them, as they will have to implement it. Once socialized with leadership, we worldwide videoconference with the entire organization to define and describe the purpose, intent, how, and why — so everyone knew what we were trying to do and what their role was in execution. I found you cannot over-communicate when trying to make changes.

It’s an incredible accomplishment to become the first woman in U.S. Military history to achieve the four-star officer rank. Can you tell me about how things changed (or maybe still need to change further) in terms of your experience during your 37 years of service, and how you addressed diversity and inclusion in the military?

First, I certainly didn’t accomplish this by myself — I had a lot of help along the way! I joined the Army as part of the Women’s Army Corps (WAC) back in 1975. A few years later they disestablished the WAC and began the integration of women into the regular Army. This was the first time women had the opportunity to have the same career opportunities as their male counterparts in the branches now open to women. The challenge for the women who came into the Army back then was to force the integration — fight being put into traditional jobs like being a secretary, admin, clerk, or cook — and fight to be platoon leaders, etc., to support and move the integration of women into the regular Army.

What I witnessed during my time in the Army was that the doors continued to open. Yes, there were roadblocks — but there were also many leaders along the way who were willing to help. I never worked for a woman. I worked for men who either believed in me or didn’t. My experience in my almost four decades was that the doors continued to open for women. I thought jumping out of airplanes was really neat — now my niece in the USAF is an A-10 fighter pilot, and we have women graduating from Ranger school!  

On diversity, I realized that being the only female in many forums, my voice was hard to be heard. And I also realized that most folks promoted and surrounded themselves with people in their own image. What my philosophy was — and I still think it is an issue today — is that diversity is not about numbers, it’s about getting the best and brightest from all walks of life, to help leaders solve the very complex issues that face us today. Don’t surround yourself with only people that think or act or look like you.

Who are the leaders that inspire you today?

I think we are products of our past — Mom and Dad, even though not here on earth, gave me the values that still guide me. Many of my military mentors, Gen. Hugh Shelton, Gen. Pete Schoomaker, Gen. Gordon Sullivan, Gen. Dick Cody, are still coaches and mentors to me today.  

Folks I admire: Warren Buffett, only met him once but I like his concern for the betterment of our country; Oprah Winfrey, although I have never met her I admire her for what she does for our country how she presents herself and how she handles herself — awesome; Gen. Mattis — wow, I admire him for taking on this extremely tough assignment for the good of our country and our defense. Secretary Gates served two administrations, Republican and Democrat.

People that inspire me are people I believe are true leaders — valuing honesty and having the best interests of the country at heart. No hubris!

WPTavern: WP Engine Acquires StudioPress

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 06/28/2018 - 08:11

StudioPress, founded by Brian Gardner in 2007, has been acquired by managed WordPress hosting company WP Engine, for an undisclosed amount.

In 2007, Gardner created the Revolution theme which took the WordPress world by storm. According to some people, it ignited the WordPress Premium theme market.

Revolution Church Theme

In the midst of a GPL debate regarding themes in 2008, Gardner decided to license the Revolution theme as 100% GPL. In 2009, Gardner rebranded Revolution to StudioPress due to legal reasons.

Early in 2010, StudioPress released the Genesis Framework. This framework would go on to power thousands of themes and be the cornerstone of StudioPress’ theme business. In 2010, StudioPress was merged into Copyblogger Media LLC, which eventually went on to create the Rainmaker platform.

Fast forward to 2018 and StudioPress has been acquired by WP Engine, a managed WordPress hosting company founded in 2010 that earlier this year, received $250M in venture capital funding from Silver Lake. 

According to Jason Cohen, founder of WP Engine, this is the largest acquisition in the company’s history.

“In all, our contributions to the WordPress community in time, money, writing, coding and thought leadership totaled more than $1.7 million in 2017 and we’re already doing even more this year,” he said.

“As WP Engine continues to grow and scale, the way we give back to the WordPress community must grow and scale also, which was one of the deciding factors behind our acquisition of StudioPress—our largest acquisition in WP Engine’s history.”

The company plans to heavily invest in the Genesis Framework community and ecosystem by hiring people to work on different aspects of the framework. Support will receive a boost as well as the ecosystem surrounding StudioPress’ products.

With Gutenberg on the horizon, Cohen says the Genesis Framework will be a shining example of what’s possible with WordPress’ new editor.

“There’s been plenty of concern about how Gutenberg will affect existing plugins and themes, so Genesis can serve as an example for how Gutenberg can work brilliantly,” Cohen said. 

“This directly advances the goals of WordPress Core. This precedent doesn’t stop with Gutenberg, either. Gutenberg is the transformation of today—there will be more tomorrow. While the topic of the day will change, the idea of supporting Core through themes and theme frameworks that support those efforts is an asset for the wider WordPress community.”

Gardner will stay on board and be part of StudioPress’ leadership team at WP Engine with an emphasis on product development and community. Nathan Rice along with the support team will transition to WP Engine with Rice continuing to serve as the lead developer of Genesis.

Gardner admits that the acquisition is bittersweet, but that it’s a founding moment in the company’s history.

“As my new colleague, Jason Cohen, the founder of WP Engine often says, ‘There are many founding moments in the history of a company.’ This is one of those moments and I know it’s time for StudioPress to take the next step—and WP Engine is the right partner to take it with.”

StudioPress customers can expect better support, more themes to choose from, and little to no disruption of service. 

WPTavern: Free “JavaScript for WordPress Conference” to Stream Live Friday, June 29

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 06/28/2018 - 02:49
JavaScript for WordPress conference

Zac Gordon is hosting a “JavaScript for WordPress Conference” with two tracks on Friday, June 29, from 9:30 AM – 5:30 PM EDT. The free conference, sponsored by 10up and WP Buffs, includes a full day of online talks from JavaScript professionals who work in the WordPress ecosystem.

Gordon will be streaming the talks live via Crowdcast. Approximately 1,300 seats have been reserved so far, a number that rivals most WordCamps. Unlike WordCamps, however, the entire schedule is focused around developer education, featuring more technical talks that are often missing from traditional WordPress events.

“I figured there was an interest in more JS-specific WordPress content and, given my courses and getting to know some people working a lot with JavaScript, I figured I would give it a shot,” Gordon said.

Gordon has been working for the past several years as a freelance educator after his former employer, Treehouse, dropped support for WordPress education. He said his first project, the JavaScript for WordPress Master Course, was a huge undertaking. He is not offering that course anymore but is instead focusing on smaller, more targeted courses on his site javascriptforwp.com.

“Most of my courses this year will be Gutenberg related (have one now and a theme course launching next week, followed by an Advanced one after that),” Gordon said. He has also done courses at Udemy, Frontend Master, WP Sessions, WP101, and some consulting with Udacity.

“I’m still learning the right price points and packaging and size,” Gordon said. “A few companies have gotten group accounts for their teams which is really positive and encouraging for me.”

Gordon took a deep dive into JavaScript education after Matt Mullenweg issued a challenge to “Learn JavaScript Deeply” during his 2015 State of the Word address. He said so far the courses he offers have been going well and the community seems to have embraced the challenge.

“The funny thing about Learning JavaScript Deeply is that people will still be able to build things in Gutenberg and beyond without really knowing it deeply,” Gordon said. “However most in the community have already picked up React or delved deeper into Vanilla JavaScript, and those who haven’t I believe certainly will be in the coming months and years.

“Now with React in Core and the rebuilding of many parts of the admin with JS, we will have more real practical reasons to heed Matt’s call than we did before.”

If the “JavaScript for WordPress Conference” goes well, Gordon said he hopes to make it an annual event. He is also considering doing a free day of workshops. All the talks given during the conference on Friday will be recorded and Gordon plans to drip them out over the coming months on his YouTube channel.

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