Wordpress News

WPTavern: How the Student-Owned Pelham Examiner Uses WordPress to Empower Young Journalists

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 10/08/2018 - 20:52

When the News of Pelham became another casualty of the blighted newspaper industry, student journalist contributors lost a platform for their voices to be heard. Their advisor, Rich Zahradnik, called a meeting to address the paper’s closure. More than a dozen middle and high school kids showed up and decided to start their own paper: The Pelham Examiner.

Zahradnik is a former journalist who has been volunteering for years in the local elementary schools, teaching kids how to write news stories. Before the News of Pelham shut down he was acting as a liaison to recruit student contributors. He registered the Examiner as a corporation and the paper is also part of the New York Press Association.

The Pelham Examiner is an online-only publication that covers everything from local politics and crime to sports and entertainment. It is running on WordPress, using plugins like All-in-One Event Calendar and WP Polls to enhance students’ stories. The site uses the FLEX WordPress Theme by SNO, an organization that sells publishing solutions for scholastic news programs.

WordPress provided a cost-effective way to launch a student-run newspaper and students also found it to be intuitive for publishing.

“We chose to use WordPress mainly because of the ease with which we could use it and create a website look that worked for our goal,” Executive Editor Ben Glickman said. Zahradnik had used the platform with prior publications he had worked on with students at Colonial Elementary School.

“Several of the students who had worked on The Colonial Times loosely remembered some aspects of WordPress, but most of us had to learn from the beginning,” Glickman said. “I started with the basics (creating new articles, saving drafts, etc.) and worked my way up to the more complex stuff.” Most students contributing to the Pelham Examiner didn’t require much training to get up to speed with publishing articles.

“Personally, I thought that much of WordPress was rather intuitive, so learning was not too hard,” Glickman said. “I haven’t had any problems with WordPress so far. I’ve been especially impressed with how easy it is to integrate all kinds of story elements into a given story.”

Poynter published a story last week about the enthusiastic and highly motivated group of young journalists behind the Pelham Examiner. For now the publication is self-sustaining with volunteer contributions, but Zahradnik told Poynter that he is open to ads or investors in the future.

Sustaining the news as a business is another skill the students will need to learn as the publishing industry is increasingly demanding more creative revenue models from journalists who want to work independently. Zahradnik told Poynter that the Pelham Examiner’s student-owned online paper could be a model for other places that are no longer able to support traditional local newspapers.

The News of Pelham was a bi-weekly, print-only publication before it closed its doors. With a WordPress-powered website, students can get the news out faster, publishing every day with virtually no overhead costs.

“I think the model for the Examiner is absolutely reproducible,” Glickman said. “For the relatively small price of a startup fee and annual hosting and support fees, you can essentially have the same type of town or city coverage with a conventional town newspaper.”

YG Logistics

Drupal Themes - Mon, 10/08/2018 - 15:09

YG Magazine

Drupal Themes - Mon, 10/08/2018 - 15:07

YG Magazine is modern and feature-rich Drupal theme developed to help you to create a stunning website for Magazine and News.

Features

  • Drupal 8 core
  • Bootstrap v3.0.0
  • Lastest News
  • Featured News

Download Demo Site

It is highly recommended to install the demo site and customize it to get the exact look. Here is the link for the documentation to install demo site

Demo login credentials : admin / admin@123

Thanks for checking out our theme. We can install the theme in your server for free!

Contact us for free installation


Other YG Business themes


Credits

Drupal theme by Young Globes

YG Medicare

Drupal Themes - Mon, 10/08/2018 - 11:32

YG Medicare is modern and feature-rich Drupal theme developed to help you to create a stunning website for Clinics and Hospitals.

Features

  • Drupal 8 core
  • Bootstrap v3.0.0
  • Treatments
  • Gallery
  • Patient Information
  • Team
  • Testimonials

Theme Dependency : Bootstrap

Download Demo Site

It is highly recommended to install the demo site and customize it to get the exact look. Here is the link for the documentation to install demo site

Demo login credentials : admin / admin@123

Thanks for checking out our theme. We can install the theme in your server for free!

Contact us for free installation


Other YG Business themes


Credits

Drupal theme by Young Globes

YG Simple

Drupal Themes - Sat, 10/06/2018 - 14:45

YG Simple Drupal 8 responsive theme for websites.

Features

  • Drupal 8 core
  • Bootstrap v3
  • Services
  • About
  • Team

Live Demo Download Demo Site

It is highly recommended to install the demo site and customize it to get the exact look. Here is the link for the documentation to install demo site

Demo login credentials : admin / admin@123

Thanks for checking out our theme. We can install the theme in your server for free!

Contact us for free installation


Other YG themes

  • YG Booster: A free bootstrap based Drupal 8 theme with modern design for products and business
  • YG Newage: an app landing page theme built using bootstrap
  • YG Agency: Theme perfect for portfolio and agency websites
  • YG Flew: Theme perfect for business websites


Credits

Drupal theme by Young Globes

YG Insurance

Drupal Themes - Sat, 10/06/2018 - 11:57

YG Insurance Drupal 8 responsive theme for Insurance Agents, Agencies and similar.

Features

  • Drupal 8 core
  • Bootstrap v3
  • Services
  • Testimonials
  • Clients

Live Demo Download Demo Site

It is highly recommended to install the demo site and customize it to get the exact look. Here is the link for the documentation to install demo site

Demo login credentials : admin / admin@123

Thanks for checking out our theme. We can install the theme in your server for free!

Contact us for free installation


Other YG themes

  • YG Booster: A free bootstrap based Drupal 8 theme with modern design for products and business
  • YG Newage: an app landing page theme built using bootstrap
  • YG Agency: Theme perfect for portfolio and agency websites
  • YG Flew: Theme perfect for business websites


Credits

Drupal theme by Young Globes

WPTavern: WordPress Theme and Plugin Shops are Pioneering the First Layout Blocks for Gutenberg

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 10/04/2018 - 15:24
photo credit: Jeffrey Betts

Many WordPress theme shops started out with themes as their only products but over the years have moved into selling plugins that enhance their core products. This came about partially because theming standards evolved to encourage developers to put non-presentational functionality into plugins. For many, the revenue from plugins quickly eclipsed that of their theme products. In the past, theme shops have often partnered with page builder plugins to enhance their users’ capabilities in customizing the themes. This may soon change, as the advent of Gutenberg is bringing new product opportunities to theme and plugin shops shops.

The first iteration of the new editor focuses on blocks and the post editing experience. After Gutenberg is in core, the project will move on to the second phase – full site customization. This will venture into page builder type functionality. Matt Mullenweg predicts this phase will happen much faster than phase 1, since all of the infrastructure is already in place. The plugin already has a columns block in beta.

Gutenberg is scheduled to debut in WordPress 5.0 in November, but site customization functionality won’t arrive until 2019 at the earliest. In the meantime, plugin developers have been experimenting with various implementations of “section” and “container” blocks while the Gutenberg team explores a core container block for phase 2.

Marie Comet’s WP Container Block is a fork of the core columns block that offers columns structure, spacing, and backgrounds (with both image and color controls). Felix Arntz recently published a tutorial on how he built a reusable Gutenberg section block. Marc Lacroix created his own container block, out of necessity, with capabilities for spacing and background customization.

Section/container blocks are a precursor to using Gutenberg for building more complex layouts. Some of these explorations may inform the Gutenberg team’s implementation of a core container block in the future.

A few more full-featured layout blocks are starting to pop up on WordPress.org. Kadence Themes, a theme and plugin shop based in Missoula, Montana, released its Kadence Blocks – Gutenberg Page Builder Toolkit at the end of August. The plugin brings the editor closer to delivering the features users expect from popular page builders, such as better control of columns for different screen sizes and a row/layout block with controls for padding, backgrounds, alignment, and overlays with gradients.

A live “Frontenberg” style demo of Kadence Blocks is available where you can see the plugin’s options for manipulating page layout.

Pootlepress, a WordPress plugin and theme shop, has added a new Layouts block to its free Caxton plugin. The company is one of the earlier Gutenberg adopters in the WooCommerce space with its recent release of the Storefront Blocks plugin.

Caxton bills itself as a “page layout plugin” for Gutenberg. Its layout block allows users to select from a number of preset layouts and then add blocks within those layouts. It supports nesting rows and row backgrounds. A Frontenberg demo site gives users the chance to play around with the page builder functionality before installing the plugin.

Until Gutenberg adds core support for more layout capabilities, WordPress may see an influx of these layout blocks that introduce basic page builder functionality. Some of these plugins may need to be refactored once there is more direction for these features in core, but they offer a glimpse of what Gutenberg will bring to site customization. Combined with Gutenberg 3.9’s reusable, exportable templates for multiple blocks, page layouts will become more portable than ever. In 2019, we may see new sites popping up that enable users and developers to share the layout designs they have created.

WPTavern: WPWeekly Episode 332 – The WordPress 5.0 Release Cycle Begins

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 10/04/2018 - 00:30

In this episode, John James Jacoby and I discuss the headlines making the rounds in the WordPress community. This includes the start of the WordPress 5.0 release cycle, the 5th annual Hacktoberfest, and theme developers marketing their themes as Gutenberg-compatible. Near the end of the show, I describe how much of the press surrounding WordPress security issues is poorly written and John talks about the benefits of being in the same physical space as your co-workers at least once or twice a year.

Stories Discussed:

WordPress Theme Developers Begin Marketing Themes as Gutenberg Compatible

First Wave of WordCamp Europe 2019 Tickets Sells Out in 3 Hours

5th Annual Hacktoberfest Kicks Off Today, Updated Rules Require 5 Pull Requests to Earn a T-shirt

Matt Mullenweg Announces WordPress 5.0 Release Plan, Estimates Release Candidate to Ship in November

GoDaddy Hires Mike Schroder to Contribute to WordPress Core Full-Time

WPWeekly Meta:

Next Episode: Wednesday, October 10th 3:00 P.M. Eastern

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via Itunes

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Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via Stitcher Radio

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via Google Play

Listen To Episode #332:

WPTavern: WordPress 5.0 Slated for November 19, 2018

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 10/03/2018 - 23:23

A tentative 5.0 release schedule was published during today’s core dev chat. The official release is targeted for November 19, 2018 with beta 1 expected October 19 and RC 1 released October 30.

In addition to getting Gutenberg merged into core, the scope for 5.0 includes a few new items that Gary Pendergast outlined in his post:

  • Updating the default themes to work well with the block editor, and creating the new Twenty Nineteen theme.
  • Creating an upgrade experience to remove the Gutenberg plugin and offer the Classic Editor plugin.

November 19 is the week of the Thanksgiving holiday in the U.S., when many are traveling or spending time with friends and family. As this is scheduled during a busy time of year and may have unexpected delays, the release leads have come up with a backup plan that includes a secondary schedule.

“We know there is a chance that 5.0 will need additional time, so these dates can slip by up to 8 days if needed,” Pendergast said. His post proposes an additional timeline that would have 5.0 land in January:

Secondary RC 1: January 8, 2019

Secondary Release: January 22, 2019

“The current release date is November 19, but it can be pushed as late as November 27 if needed,” Pendergast said. “To avoid the numerous holidays from the end of November through to January, we’ll move the release to January if more time is needed.”

Although the backup timeline should allay concerns about December holidays, if the release is at all delayed, it will run up against the Thanksgiving holiday.

“Should we need to switch to the secondary dates, this will be communicated as soon as we’re aware,” Pendergast said. “It’s also important to note that we have some updates for PHP 7.3 compatibility that must be released in 2018 regardless, and we would have a short 4.9.9 release cycle for them if needed.”

Contributors had the opportunity to ask questions of the release leads during today’s 5.0 kickoff meeting. There was some uncertainty in yesterday’s announcements about whether 5.0 will ship a new default theme. Matt Mullenweg confirmed that they are aiming to get Twenty Nineteen into 5.0.

“It’s the biggest variable though, so if it takes longer we won’t delay the release for it,” Mullenweg said.

Twenty Nineteen development will happen on GitHub and contributors can join the discussion in the #core-themes Slack channel where regular meetings will happen.

Gutenberg engineer Riad Benguella posted a technical overview of the integration process for merging the new editor into core. He also laid out a plan for how Gutenberg development will continue in the future.

“After WordPress 5.0 is released, the Gutenberg plugin will continue to exist,” Benguella said. “Its purpose will be changed to the development and the maintenance of the WordPress npm packages, including the editor itself, and will also serve to develop the second phase (site customization) of the Gutenberg project. Plugin updates will continue to be released during the 5.0 cycle.

“The PHP part of the plugin won’t be needed anymore, as the plugin will just register new versions of the scripts of the packages to replace the ones already registered by Core.”

Mullenweg confirmed during the dev chat that the team plans to add a link to the Classic Editor plugin in the admin when 5.0 ships. Overall, contributors in attendance seemed excited about the prospect of finally having the new editor in core, despite the ambitious timeline proposed for release.

“A big benefit even beyond the user improvements is that plugin and theme developers will be able to truly use it as a base in a way that they can’t right now as a plugin,” Mullenweg said. “If previous adoption curves hold true, we’d be on 10m sites (20x current adoption) by new year.”

Gutenberg development has been moving quickly and after it is shipped to millions of WordPress users there are bound to be more issues discovered. Mullenweg said quick point releases may be an option for maintaining the flexibility to introduce fixes and improvements in a timely way for users.

“Since 5.0 will be very tight (just Gutenberg, PHP 7.3, and possibly theme) I am open to having 5.0.x releases that are like the 4.9.x releases that bring in some larger updates or improvements we push off, like servehappy stuff,” he said.

Gutenberg technical lead Matias Ventura has outlined the tasks remaining on the editor. An updated schedule for the 5.0 release cycle is now available for the public to follow. Gary Pendergast, who is shepherding the merge, said he expects WordPress 5.1 will be available around March 2019.

WPTavern: GoDaddy Hires Mike Schroder to Contribute to WordPress Core Full-Time

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 10/03/2018 - 05:57

Mike Schroder known at GetSource on Twitter and Mike on WordPress’ Slack instance is joining Aaron Campbell at GoDaddy to contribute to WordPress full-time.

Since 2011, Schroder has contributed to nearly every version of WordPress. In 2014, Schroder co-led the release of WordPress 3.9. In 2016, he lead the release of WordPress 4.5. He’s also an accomplished speaker presenting on various topics at WordCamps across the world.

According to Gabriel Mays, WordPress products and strategy leader at GoDaddy, Schroder will continue to work on the Media component in WordPress, lead the WordPress Hosting Community work group, and help merge Gutenberg into WordPress 5.0. 

WPTavern: Matt Mullenweg Announces WordPress 5.0 Release Plan, Estimates Release Candidate to Ship in November

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 10/03/2018 - 03:19

Matt Mullenweg has announced a plan for releasing WordPress 5.0 with a tentative estimate for a release candidate to ship in November.

“With known knowns and known unknowns, I believe we will be at RC in about a month,” Mullenweg said. “However, I’ll be keeping a close eye on feedback during the beta process and adjust as needed and keep the community fully up-to-date with our best estimate.”

Gutenstats.blog shows that the beta plugin has passed 490,000 active installations, which Mullenweg said “far exceeds pre-release testing of anything that has ever come into core.” The Classic Editor plugin also has more than 400,000 installations, indicating nearly half a million site owners have already prepared to preserve their existing workflows.

“If we keep the 5.0 release to strictly 4.9.8 + Gutenberg, we will have a release that is both major and a non-event in terms of new code,” Mullenweg said. “It’s all battle-tested. In some ways 5.0 is already de facto out in the wild, with some forward-looking hosts already installing and activating Gutenberg for new installs.”

Mullenweg is leading the release but has designated 11 other leads to head up various focuses, including triage, design, JavaScript packages, REST API, merge process and several other important aspects of the release.

WordPress users can also expect a new default Twenty Nineteen theme to ship with 5.0. Designer Allan Cole will be leading that project, which involves adapting an existing Gutenberg theme for use as WordPress’ next default theme.

Last week’s developer chat left many attendees wondering about the status of WordPress 4.9.9. Contributors discussed the possibility of making it a quick PHP 7.3 compatibility release but it now appears to be all hands on deck as the focus shifts to 5.0.

Based on today’s announcement, it seems very likely that WordPress 5.0 will land before the end of 2018, barring any major impediments. The timeline for this major release falls during a busy time of year for many who will be responsible for preparing their products and client sites. Mullenweg said he will keep the community up-to-date as the release cycle progresses. The agenda for tomorrow’s dev chat will focus on 5.0 planning.

HeroPress: There Are No Shortcuts

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 10/03/2018 - 00:00

My name is JC and I make things for the web. I wear a lot of hats but my favorite one is as a WordPress developer. And I am here to tell you about my journey. It was not easy. There were no shortcuts. I had to crawl my way up every single step of the way. And I still have to, it did not become easier – not by a long shot. But I’ve accepted that in order to succeed I have to take the long way and that is basically two words long – WORK HARD.

When I was young, I wanted to be and do a lot of things. I wanted to be an astronaut, a lawyer, a geophysicist. I wanted a pet unicorn or a tiger or a lion or a snake. I wanted to be the first woman to roam the solar system, I wanted to be a world-renowned author. I never became nor did any of those but I did get a pet snake named Yudi and I have a lot of “pet” unicorns.

I studied engineering because it was the “IT” course during my time. Did I like it? Let’s just say that I had a lot of fun, a lot of heartaches, a lot of sleepless nights and leave it at that. But if you really want to know – what I really, really want to be right now is to be a TimeLord STAT, but I digress. I think, the main reason I took that course was because I didn’t want to be with a lot of girls. I didn’t want to compete and I was not really into all that girly-girly stuff. It all changed, by the way. I graduated and took the board – I did not pass. Much to the horror of my engineer dad. I never really wanted to be an engineer so I did not bother taking the board again, instead, I worked in a call center. My first work was as a tech support for Dell computers. I got to tinker with laptops and help seniors fix theirs thousands of miles away and I even got to experience them happily shouting telling me that I do not know what I am doing. Fun times.

I did that for a year and I decided that that was not the life for me nor the life I wanted my daughter to see me in.

So we went back home to Iloilo and had my second job there, this time as a Search Engine Optimization Analyst. Fancy title, but all I did was search Google for stuff and write stuff for Google to digest. My boss’ site was built on WordPress and I created content for him. That was my first contact with WordPress.

Working in that position for a few months bothered me, I know I am capable of more than just that (I am impatient and hard-headed and can’t keep my mouth shut – the perfect combination). So I read about web development. I didn’t know how to code – give me mathematical equations and I’ll solve it right away but all these HTML, CSS and whatnot were alien to me.

But I persevered, I never took a shortcut.

I studied for about a month and decided that I was ready. Plus, I’ve heard about this online job site where you can register to be a freelancer – it was quite new at that time but I gave it a go. If you’ve heard of oDesk (now Upwork), I was one of the first freelancers to join and I had the shirt to prove it. I don’t have the shirt now, but they sent it to me when they ran this contest for the freelancer with the longest work record.

I applied to one job and one of the requirements was WordPress. I didn’t know WordPress aside from using it as a blog, and I know HTML/CSS (in theory). Lucky me, the client who eventually turned into my longest online friend, took a chance on me. I did not exactly tell him that I did not know WordPress, instead I told him what he wanted to hear – That I CAN DO IT. And I did. I worked on designing and developing his website while studying WordPress.

And that was when my love affair with WordPress started. I continued to learn and gain experience throughout the years.

There are NO SHORTCUTS. Believe me, I tried looking for one and I failed. In order to succeed, you have to work hard and not take the easy way out. Learn, read, listen – do this every single day for as long as you can.

Although, my first client never really knew until now that I never had any idea what I was doing when I started working for him, I did get the job done (Dr. T, if you’re reading this – Thank you! I won’t say sorry, because that will denigrate all the things I’ve done and all the things I’ve learned over the years I was working with you). I persevered, I didn’t quit when the going got rough. Plus, WordPress has an amazing community and they are more than willing to help you out if you ever get stuck and I used them as a lifeline more times than I can remember.

Let me say this again, it was not easy. I went through a lot. Moving forward, all of my clients were from abroad, most of them naturally assumed that I am male because of my name. And I think that contributed to how they were responding to my emails or chat.

They treated me as an equal and responded in a way they wouldn’t had they known I am female.

And once they knew, it was really hard for them to back out since they know that I am capable of getting the job done.

I was brought up to always question the norm, to not back down simply because I am part of the so-called “weaker gender”. I speak my mind when I have to and when and where I choose to. Working in a male-dominated industry is pretty hard, gender bias is palpable in this industry. Plus, there are not a lot of women developers and that is really sad because without women – computing as we know it would not exist.

You see, women have a harder time getting into the world of information technology because it has become male-dominated. I have a first-hand experience in this, imagine me – a woman, an Asian and a Filipino at that working in a space where men are the be-all end-all. I will say it again, it was not easy.

Have you heard about the competence/likeability dilemma? The Heidi/Howard Roizen Case Study concluded that when women exhibit characteristics associated with leaders – like assertion, authority, and dominant behaviors – they tend to be disliked. Hence, women cannot be both competent and likeable.

So according to this study: My competence is inversely proportional to my likeability. Meaning the more competent I am the less my colleagues like me. I may completely and vehemently disagree with this conclusion on a personal level, but there is truth to it. What can we do about this? I guess the first step is to acknowledge that it exists and work from there. But do not just be aware of the problem, acknowledge it and make a conscious effort to see when you are unconsciously adding to the problem and act on it. I don’t have a magic solution, what I can do is help empower girls to realize that they are stronger than they think they are and that they can do more. I did it without any shortcuts, I studied, I persevered, I worked my ass off to get where I am right now and I am not done yet. I still have to study, to preserve and to work every single day.

My journey doesn’t end here, I still have a ways to go. I will continue to love what I do and I assure you, once you love what you do – you’ll work your ass off to make sure you continue to have and experience the joy of being able to do that thing that you love. Do not let your gender, your race or any of your biases define you. It is not a walk in the park, sure, but you have to always, always do your best to not regret doing something because you think you can’t. The only limit is YOU and nothing or no one else.

The post There Are No Shortcuts appeared first on HeroPress.

WPTavern: 5th Annual Hacktoberfest Kicks Off Today, Updated Rules Require 5 Pull Requests to Earn a T-shirt

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 10/02/2018 - 02:07

DigitalOcean, along with GitHub and new partner Twilio, are sponsoring the 5th annual Hacktoberfest. The event was created to encourage participants to make meaningful contributions to open source projects. Last year 31,901 completed the challenge, opening 239,164 pull requests in 64,166 repositories.

In previous years, participants were required to submit four pull requests to GitHub-hosted public repositories during the month of October in order to earn a limited edition Hacktoberfest t-shirt. The event’s organizers have increased the number of required PRs to five this year and only the first 50,000 will earn a t-shirt.

No open source project is too small to benefit from Hacktoberfest. Maintainers who want to attract new contributors can apply the “Hacktoberfest” label to issues that are appropriate for newcomers to work on. A few projects are highlighted on the event’s homepage and there are already more than 17,000 issues designated for Hacktoberfest that are ready for contributors to tackle over the next 31 days.

WPTavern: First Wave of WordCamp Europe 2019 Tickets Sells Out in 3 Hours

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 10/01/2018 - 17:33

The first batch of tickets for WordCamp Europe 2019 were released early this morning and all 250 standard tickets sold out within three hours and nine minutes. Berlin won out as the next city to host the camp, in part due to the region’s strong local WordPress community. The city is international, diverse, and easily accessible for those traveling for the conference.

WCEU 2019 will be held at the Estrel Hotel and Congress Center from June 20-22. It is a large venue with a max capacity of 12,000 people, capable of hosting both conference days, the contributor day, and the after party. Local lead organizer Bernhard Kau said his team is currently planning for 2,500 – 3,000 attendees. A discount is available for those who want to stay at the Estrel Hotel.

The past six editions of WCEU have been so successful that it is now firmly established as a can’t-miss event in the WordPress world. Although the first set of standard tickets have already sold out in record time, a few dozen Micro-sponsor tickets are still available for €150.00. More standard tickets will be available on Wednesday, October 3rd. Subscribe for updates on the WCEU 2019 website and follow the official Twitter account to be notified when the next batch goes on sale.

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