Wordpress News

WordPress.org blog: WordPress 5.4 RC5

Wordpress Planet - Sat, 03/28/2020 - 00:47


The fifth release candidate for WordPress 5.4 is live!

WordPress 5.4 is currently scheduled to land on March 31 2020, and we need your help to get there—if you haven’t tried 5.4 yet, now is the time!

You can test the WordPress 5.4 release candidate in two ways:

For details about what to expect in WordPress 5.4, please see the first release candidate post.

Plugin and Theme Developers

Please test your plugins and themes against WordPress 5.4 and update the Tested up to version in the readme to 5.4. The priority in testing is compatibility. If you find issues, please be sure to post to the support forums so we can figure them out before the final release.

The WordPress 5.4 Field Guide is also out! It’s your source for details on all the major changes.

How to Help

Do you speak a language besides English? Help us translate WordPress into more than 100 languages!

If you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. We’d love to hear from you! If you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, file one on WordPress Trac, where you can also find a list of known bugs.

WordPress.org blog: WordPress 5.4 RC5

Wordpress Planet - Sat, 03/28/2020 - 00:47


The fifth release candidate for WordPress 5.4 is live!

WordPress 5.4 is currently scheduled to land on March 31 2020, and we need your help to get there—if you haven’t tried 5.4 yet, now is the time!

You can test the WordPress 5.4 release candidate in two ways:

For details about what to expect in WordPress 5.4, please see the first release candidate post.

Plugin and Theme Developers

Please test your plugins and themes against WordPress 5.4 and update the Tested up to version in the readme to 5.4. The priority in testing is compatibility. If you find issues, please be sure to post to the support forums so we can figure them out before the final release.

The WordPress 5.4 Field Guide is also out! It’s your source for details on all the major changes.

How to Help

Do you speak a language besides English? Help us translate WordPress into more than 100 languages!

If you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. We’d love to hear from you! If you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, file one on WordPress Trac, where you can also find a list of known bugs.

WordPress 5.4 RC5

Wordpress News - Sat, 03/28/2020 - 00:47


The fifth release candidate for WordPress 5.4 is live!

WordPress 5.4 is currently scheduled to land on March 31 2020, and we need your help to get there—if you haven’t tried 5.4 yet, now is the time!

You can test the WordPress 5.4 release candidate in two ways:

For details about what to expect in WordPress 5.4, please see the first release candidate post.

Plugin and Theme Developers

Please test your plugins and themes against WordPress 5.4 and update the Tested up to version in the readme to 5.4. The priority in testing is compatibility. If you find issues, please be sure to post to the support forums so we can figure them out before the final release.

The WordPress 5.4 Field Guide is also out! It’s your source for details on all the major changes.

How to Help

Do you speak a language besides English? Help us translate WordPress into more than 100 languages!

If you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. We’d love to hear from you! If you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, file one on WordPress Trac, where you can also find a list of known bugs.

Emulsify Drupal

Drupal Themes - Fri, 03/27/2020 - 21:29
Storybook development + Webpack Build + Drupal 8 theme

Emulsify is now a full Design System that speeds up single site builds and can scale to support large organizations with multiple properties. The ecosystem consists of a Style Guide generator, Component Libraries powered by Storybook and a workflow powered by Webpack.

This project provides a Drupal 8 starterkit theme with a Component Library powered by Storybook/Webpack. It can be used as a standalone prototyping tool or inside a Drupal installation.

Quick Links
  1. Installation
  2. Usage
Contributing Code of Conduct

The project maintainers have adopted a Code of Conduct that we expect project participants to adhere to. Please read the full text so that you can understand what actions will and will not be tolerated.

Contribution Guide

Please also follow the issue template and pull request templates provided. See below for the correct places to post issues:

  1. Emulsify Drupal
  2. Emulsify Twig Extensions
  3. Emulsify Twig Drupal Module

WPTavern: Font Awesome Releases New COVID-19 Awareness Icons

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 03/27/2020 - 20:00
COVID-19 awareness icons added to Font Awesome.

On Monday, the Font Awesome team launched a new set of icons to promote awareness around COVID-19. The solid icons available in the Font Awesome 5.13 update are all available for free and are open-source. The regular, light, and duotone versions of the icons are a part of the pro package.

The goal of the new icons is to help websites and apps boost awareness around the global pandemic. The latest update adds 47 new icons that range from medical use to promoting hygienic practices such as hand washing. Some icons represent viruses and social/physical distancing. There is even a couple of toilet paper icons thrown in for good measure. Apparently, those are necessary in today’s world of mass panic buying.

“Based on recommendations from The World Health Organization and others, you’ll find symbols to communicate good hygiene and social distancing,” wrote Jory Raphael, Icon Design Lead at Font Awesome. “While we can’t be on the front lines like brave medical professionals across the globe, we hope these icons aid in communicating some of the most important things people can do to protect themselves and their communities.”

The icons were originally requested two weeks ago on the Font Awesome GitHub repository. The design team moved quickly to make them available. There are additional icon tickets for liquid soap and a bar of soap open.

Like all Font Awesome icons, the new icons are available as part of the font package or for download as individual SVG files.

The fonts may come in handy for website owners, designers, and developers who are building sites or pages with content related to COVID-19. Icons can add context to content or focus attention where needed.

Users of the Font Awesome WordPress plugin should have immediate access to the new icons if needed. The plugin relies on the external Font Awesome CDN or Font Awesome kits. Users can also choose which version of the library of icons they wish to use, which includes the latest release.

If you know of any other icon sets or resources for designers and developers related to COVID-19, please share them in the comments.

WPTavern: Gutenberg 7.8 Adds Patterns API and Continues Interface Cleanup

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 03/26/2020 - 20:06

Version 7.8 of the Gutenberg plugin landed yesterday. The team continues to improve the editor with the refreshed interface work that began in version 7.7. The most useful feature with this update of the plugin is the inclusion of the Patterns API for plugin and theme developers.

This release is not the massive feature release that we experienced with some earlier versions. It is the culmination of many smaller improvements, particularly with improving the user interface and experience. The update includes over 20 bug fixes, some continued work on experimental features like the site editor, and several improvements in code quality.

Editing a post permalink without requiring a save should work correctly, which has been an outstanding issue for over a year. Users can now select multiple categories for the latest posts block as opposed to a single category. And, the experimental full-site editing feature now supports fullscreen mode.

UI Continues Improving Gutenberg 7.8 editor with updated preview button.

The team began a massive refresh of the user interface in Gutenberg 7.7. With this release, they continued building upon that initial work. Designers have fine-tuned several of the icons for the editor toolbar, which includes the bold, italic, strikethrough, indent, outdent, and spacer icons.

One of the most notable differences is an update to the user-facing text for the post preview button. In the previous version, there was a button that simply read “Desktop.” Once clicked, it would open a drop-down list to preview the post in desktop, tablet, or mobile mode. I had initially thought the team had removed the post preview option until I clicked on it. In version 7.8, that button’s text now reads “Preview,” which is a much-needed change that is no longer confusing.

Overall, the polishing work done on the editor looks good. At this point, I have become so accustomed to it that I have no desire to go back to a regular WordPress install without the Gutenberg plugin installed.

Building Custom Block Patterns Custom block pattern registered and in use.

I have said it before, but it bears repeating: I am excited about block patterns. I am even more excited about the ability for plugin and theme authors to begin testing this feature by building custom patterns of their own. I foresee an explosion of creativity over the next several months and beyond.

Patterns are a registration of the HTML for one or more blocks. Plugin and theme authors can further define the settings for those blocks. The Gutenberg team included a simple PHP function for developers to register custom patterns called register_pattern().

I have tinkered with numerous pattern ideas since I updated yesterday evening. The simplest way to build a pattern is to do so visually. Open the editor and create a unique group of blocks that you like. Then, switch to the code editor and copy the code. From that point, you can register the pattern via PHP and paste the copied code. There is not really much actual coding involved in the process. Even advanced users with enough DIY grit could register them within their theme’s functions.php file.

The following is a simple “hero” pattern as shown in the above screenshot that uses the cover block, a heading, a paragraph, and a buttons group (I formatted the code a little after copying and pasting for readability):

add_action( 'init', function() { register_pattern( 'tavern/hero-1', [ 'title' => __( 'Hero 1' ), 'content' => '<!-- wp:cover {"customOverlayColor":"#273f60","align":"full"} --> <div class="wp-block-cover alignfull has-background-dim" style="background-color:#273f60"> <div class="wp-block-cover__inner-container"> <!-- wp:heading {"align":"center"} --> <h2 class="has-text-align-center">Heading Title Here</h2> <!-- /wp:heading --> <!-- wp:paragraph {"align":"center"} --> <p class="has-text-align-center">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.</p> <!-- /wp:paragraph --> <!-- wp:buttons {"align":"center"} --> <div class="wp-block-buttons aligncenter"> <!-- wp:button {"className":"is-style-outline"} --> <div class="wp-block-button is-style-outline"><a class="wp-block-button__link">Button A</a></div> <!-- /wp:button --> <!-- wp:button {"className":"is-style-outline"} --> <div class="wp-block-button is-style-outline"><a class="wp-block-button__link">Button B</a></div> <!-- /wp:button --> </div> <!-- /wp:buttons --> </div> </div> <!-- /wp:cover -->' ] ); } );

Disclaimer: The preceding code is for an experimental feature and could change in later versions of the Gutenberg plugin or before the API is officially added to core WordPress.

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