Wordpress News

WPTavern: Calls to Delay WordPress 5.0 Increase, Developers Cite Usability Concerns and Numerous Bugs in Gutenberg

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 11/09/2018 - 00:03

Developers and business owners are waiting anxiously in the wings, as Gutenberg is 11 days away from its debut in WordPress 5.0. There is still a chance that the release could be delayed to the secondary date (January 22, 2019), but the decision has not yet been announced.

“I am lukewarm on the 19th, but not because of the number of open issues (which isn’t a good measure or target) — more that we’ve been a day or two behind a few times now,” 5.0 release lead Matt Mullenweg said during yesterday’s dev chat. He said that reports “from the field” continue to be good and companies that have already installed and activated the plugin haven’t reported a higher than normal support burden.

“My concern can be summed up as this,” Aaron Jorbin said. “There are approximately 400 issues that need either code or a decision to punt. Assuming five minutes per issue, that means there are about 33 hours worth of bug scrubs that need to take place between now and RC.”

“I don’t think we can make a decision on moving the date in the next 45 minutes,” Gary Pendergast said in response to concerns raised at the meeting. “I do think it’s fair to say that the Gutenberg and 5.0 leadership teams are hearing all the feedback, and are actively looking whether the timeline is still correct.”

Mullenweg said open issues are not a good measure of whether the release is on target but the numerous bugs the community is encountering has precipitated a flurry of posts advocating for the release to be delayed.

In a post titled “WordPress 5.0 needs a different timeline,” Joost de Valk, author of Yoast SEO, cites accessibility concerns and the stability of the project as reasons for a delay. de Valk identifies himself a strong supporter of Gutenberg and his team has already built compatibility and Gutenberg-first features into their plugin, which has more than 5 million active installs.

“It’s arguably one of the biggest leaps forward in WordPress’ editing experience and its developer experience in this decade,” de Valk said. “It’s also not done yet, and if we keep striving for its planned November 19th release date, we are setting ourselves up for failure.”

de Valk gave two reasons for why he believes the November 19th timeline to be untenable:

There are some severe accessibility concerns. While these aren’t new and a few people are working hard on them, I actually think we can get a better handle on fixing them if we push the release back. Right now it looks to me as though keyboard accessibility has regressed in the last few releases of Gutenberg.

The most important reason: the overall stability of the project isn’t where it needs to be yet. There are so many open issues for the 5.0 milestone that even fixing all the blockers before we’d get to Release Candidate stage next week is going to prove impossible. We have, at time of writing 212 untriaged bugs and 165 issues on the WordPress 5.0 milestone.

WordPress developer Mark Root-Wiley published a post the same day titled “WordPress 5.0 is Not Ready.” He outlined why he believes the release needs to be delayed and suggested the project pursue more auditing and quality assurance testing before shipping it out.

“WordPress 5.0 can and should be a positive change to WordPress, but if it is released in late November as planned, it won’t be,” Root-Wiley said. “There are simply too many bugs in the editor, and the experience is not polished enough. This is because the rate of development has prevented systematic quality assurance (QA) and user testing. Both types of testing are required to ensure the editor is ready and to increase the community’s confidence in the update.”

Root-Wiley describes a buggy experience when attempting to write blog posts with the new editor, which echoes many others’ recent experiences.

“I’m doing my best to give feedback, but it’s exhausting and there are so many little bugs that I struggle to isolate and replicate the one I’m reporting without running into another,” Root-Wiley said. “How is it possible for me to find so many bugs without trying from just writing 1.5 blog posts?”

Root-Wiley also suggested removing what he deemed to be unnecessary features in order to streamline the editing experience and focus on the fundamentals. These features include the tables block, paragraph background colors, spotlight and fullscreen mode, dropcaps, verse block, among others.

“The pace of development has been blistering,” Root-Wiley said. “That speed has been great for developing a lot of features and iterating on those features quickly, but it hasn’t allowed for sufficient testing. What’s needed now is more time for people to find and report bugs with the editor features in their proposed final state.”

Gutenberg criticism is often characterized as coming from people who are resistant to change, but these strong messages about delaying the release come from developers who believe the new editor is the future and have heavily invested in contributing to its success.

Both de Valk and Root-Wiley’s posts seem to have resonated with many who have had similar experiences with the editor. Other core developers and committers have also publicly lent their voices to the call to delay the release.

My thoughts are very much aligned here. I'm super excited for the release — I think it's crucial for WordPress' success. But I don't think it, nor the ecosystem, are quite ready following the shortened release cycle. https://t.co/R0nZt0mk41

— Mike Schroder (@GetSource) November 7, 2018

This: https://t.co/wpcQ02qcTw They are missing almost every milestone on their release schedule, leaving me 1 week to test with RC before Thanksgiving, and plugin/theme authors no time to develop/test with stabler code. It should just come out with their backup January date.

— Lisa Woodruff (@lisa_m_woodruff) November 8, 2018

Opinions on Gutenberg’s readiness vary wildly depending on the person’s perspective and involvement in the project. Those who are working on it full-time have not publicly offered opinions indicating that it might not be ready for the November 19 timeline.

“The 5.0 milestone is in a very manageable place, but if the volume becomes more worrying in the next couple days or it becomes clear milestones won’t be made, we’ll revise as needed,” Gutenberg technical lead Matias Ventura Ventura said during yesterday’s dev chat. He confirmed that the fast pace of development will continue.

Regardless of when 5.0 is released, users can count on getting minor releases every two weeks to address bugs and issues that pop up after Gutenberg is in the hands of millions more users.

“Hopefully as people get used to the more regular cadence they can plan around it, much like they used to complain a ton about, but then got used to, 3 major releases a year,” Mullenweg said during the dev chat.

In 2016, Mullenweg began describing how WordPress could become “the operating system of the web,” with open APIs that others can build on. While that idea encompasses a lot more than just release schedules, WordPress seems to be moving in the direction of shipping updates that come more frequently and eventually more invisibly in the background, similar to how users update their browsers. Releasing Gutenberg in its current state, with frequent updates following, could prove to be a major testing ground to see if greater world of WordPress users are ready to embrace this new era of rapid iteration.

YG Relic

Drupal Themes - Thu, 11/08/2018 - 13:50

WPTavern: Adding Aligned Images to Paragraphs in Gutenberg Is Not as Tough as I Thought

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 11/08/2018 - 07:37
Last week, I published an article that describes the process I went through in Gutenberg to try to add an aligned image to a paragraph block. I concluded that performing the task in the Classic Editor was easier than in Gutenberg. In response to the article, William Earnhardt compared the process and showed how it can be accomplished in two steps in Gutenberg.
  1. Drag an image into editor where you want it to go.
  2. Click align right.
Dragging and dropping images into WordPress is not something I do. It’s not how I write. His method is simpler but I prefer to work within the interface. His second suggestion of accomplishing the task is the method I’ll use from now on.
  1. Click the block inserter above the paragraph you want to insert the image before.
  2. Select the image block.
  3. Drag the image onto the block.
  4. Click align right.
In the last few months of using Gutenberg, I’ve become accustomed to adding new blocks by pressing enter at the end of a paragraph block or by clicking the plus sign to the left of a block. I haven’t used the plus sign between blocks but it makes sense and indeed, it’s quicker to accomplish the task. According to Earnhardt, there are even more ways to complete the task in Gutenberg. This brings up an important question, how many different ways and user interfaces should there be to accomplish a task? If you don’t do it a certain way, are you doing_it_wrong? Take for example, adding captions to images. In Gutenberg, there are at least two opportunities to add a caption. The first is the attachment details screen after uploading or selecting an image from the media library. The second is the Image block user interface. When using the Image block interface, my cursor gets stuck in the caption area and I need to click outside of the block in order to continue. If I use the attachment details screen, it automatically puts the caption text into the image block, bypassing the hurdle. Which interface am I supposed to use and which method is considered doing_it_wrong?
Adding a Caption via the Image Block Interface I’m Willing to Learn I understand the long vision of Gutenberg and what it means for the future of WordPress. For the past several months, I’ve used the plugin and interface exclusively to craft content. I’ve been learning things along the way and trying to readjust my workflows but the question I keep coming back to when doing things in Gutenberg is why? Why is this button hidden? Why are there three differently located buttons to add blocks when it would be nice to memorize one? Why does this do that and vice versa? Where is all of the research and usability testing that explains the why behind so many of the interactions and flows? Am I just a moron or is it the interface that guides me in the wrong direction? Many of my experiences in using Gutenberg this past year have been echoed by Mark Root-Wiley. He does a great job of saying what I’ve been feeling and thinking for a long time. When I and thousands of others watched Matías Ventura‏ perform a live demo of Gutenberg at the 2017 State of Word, people were blown away. But this is someone who has been creating Gutenberg from the core and is proficient in all that it offers. Is this the level of Gutenberg proficiency I and others need in order to get things done? Probably not, but at times, it sure feels that way.

WPTavern: Classic Editor Plugin May Be Included with 5.0 Updates, Support Window Set to End in 2021

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 11/07/2018 - 20:13

Gary Pendergast announced this morning that the Classic Editor plugin will be officially supported until December 31, 2021. The plugin eases the transition for sites where plugins or themes are not yet compatible with Gutenberg and gives users the opportunity to preserve their existing workflows.

“Since the Classic Editor plugin is central in this transition, we are considering including it with upgrades to WordPress 5.0,” Pendergast said. “New WordPress installs would still add it manually, and we’ve included it in the Featured Plugins list to increase visibility. If you have thoughts on this idea, please leave a comment.”

Pendergast clarified that “officially supported” means that the plugin “will be guaranteed to work as expected in the most recent major release of WordPress, and the major release before it.” He also said the project will evaluate the continuing maintenance of the plugin in 2021 and may possibly extend the date.

The post has already received quite a bit of feedback and generally positive reactions to the prospect of including the Classic Editor along with 5.0 updates for existing sites.

WordPress Core Committer Pascal Birchler asked for a clarification on what “we” referred to in Pendergast’s post, and Pendergast clarified that he is speaking on behalf of the WordPress project. Other commenters pressed for more information, as the announcement was delivered as something that had already been decided and the conversation surrounding the decision was not public.

“I’m grateful for the communication on a hard date for support of the classic editor,” Darren Ethier commented on the post. “It helps many people depending on WordPress for their livelihood to make plans surrounding things depending on it. But for volunteers who ‘show up’ at meetings and in contributing, the process for arriving at these kinds of decisions in an open source project is very opaque and seems to be increasingly so.”

This announcement highlights a trend in recent decision making for the project where decisions on important items appear to have been made behind closed doors without community input. Matthew MacPherson’s proposal for an independent accessibility audit, which had broad support from the community, was shut down in a similar way. MacPherson was named WordPress 5.0’s accessibility lead but didn’t seem to be fully vested with the power to lead that aspect of the release in the community’s best interests. I asked MacPherson if he could further clarify how the decision to forego the audit was reached, as it seemed even a surprise to him in the GitHub issue thread. He said he had “no comment” on how the decision came about.

WPCampus is now pursuing an accessibility audit in order to better serve its community of more than 800 web professionals, educators, and others who work with WordPress in higher education.

“We’re receiving a lot of interest and I’m holding meetings with potential vendors to answer their questions,” WPCampus director Rachel Cherry said. “We’ve received a lot of messages from individuals and organizations wanting to contribute financially.”

The recent report from the accessibility team demonstrates critical issues that prevent the team from recommending Gutenberg to users of assistive technology. These issues also have a major impact on those using WordPress for higher education, as the law requires them to meet certain standards. Several in this particular industry commented on Pendergast’s post to advocate for shipping the Classic Editor plugin with new installs as well.

“Many organizations who use WordPress are required by law to provide accessible software under Section 508,” Rachel Cherry said. “Until such a time when the accessibility of Gutenberg has been improved, and Section 508 compliance is clear, these organizations will require use of the Classic Editor.

“Not to mention the users who will be dependent upon the Classic Editor to have an accessible publishing experience.

“Please consider bundling Classic Editor with all versions of core, new and updated, going forward so that every end user has the easy and inclusive option of using it from day one.”

Elaine Shannon, another WordPress user who works in academia, also commented on the Pendergast’s post to recommend having the Classic Editor bundled with new versions of WordPress, due to many education sites running on multisite installations.

“Some institutions are on managed hosts, where they’ll receive 5.0 without initiating the update themselves,” Shannon said. “Others are managed by on-campus IT services, where one campus admin will push the update and affect thousands of users. In many cases, these are MultiSites where end users – the ones who need the choice of whether to use Gutenberg or Classic Editor – do not have the ability to add a plugin. So regardless of whether these users are in a brand-new shiny install or just an updated existing one, many users are going to need to fall back to the Classic Editor, and if it’s not bundled with Core there will be some folks left having to contact their administrator.”

Pendergast’s post said the WordPress project is considering including the plugin with upgrades to 5.0 but did not identify where or when that decision will be made. However, users who depend on the plugin now have a clear idea of how long it will be supported.

“As for the EOL on Classic Editor support, that’s probably more clarity than [the core team] has ever really given on a feature-to-plugin transition and I’m in favor of having that hard date,” WordPress core developer Drew Jaynes said. “It sets the right tone that the plugin is not intended as a long-term solution, rather a stopgap with a definitive EOL.”

WPTavern: Nidhi Jain Is Awarded the Kim Parsell Travel Scholarship

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 11/07/2018 - 13:59
In 2015, the WordPress Foundation created a travel scholarship in memory of Kim Parsell. The scholarship covers travel expenses, lodging, and a ticket to the event. This year’s recipient is Nidhi Jain from Udaipur, Rajasthan, India. Jain is a volunteer organizer for WordCamp Udaipur, a WordPress developer, contributor, and a seasoned traveler.
“Being selected for the Kim Parsell Memorial Scholarship is an honor, achievement and a proud moment for me,” Jain told the WordCamp US organizing team when asked what it means to be selected.  “I will try my best to make the most out of it and give back to the community in all possible ways. Since I have been a WordCamp volunteer and organizer in the last few years, I am excited to see and learn from WordCamp US. I am sure, I will have a lot of sweet memories and wonderful learnings to take back home.” Previous winners include Elizabeth Shilling in 2016 and Bianca Welds in 2017. If you’re not familiar with who Kim Parsell is, I recommend reading this essay which provides some context as to why the scholarship was created in her memory.

WPTavern: Authors of Popular WordPress.org Themes Rolling Out Gutenberg Compatibility Updates Ahead of 5.0 Release

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 11/06/2018 - 04:34

Astra, a free theme that has steadily been growing in popularity, is now fully compatible with Gutenberg. The theme was first released in May 2017 and has more than 100,000 active installations. It was downloaded approximately 2,000 – 4,500 times per day over the past month and currently maintains a 5-star average rating on WordPress.org after 844 reviews.

Astra’s creators advertise the theme as fast, lightweight (less than 50KB on frontend), and compatible with many page builders. These features have been key to its rapid growth. Last week they announced full Gutenberg compatibility, which means sites built with Astra will be able to take advantage of all the new features in the editor when 5.0 is released.

Astra’s Gutenberg compatibility update includes front-end styles displayed in the editor and support for the full-width alignment option. The width of the content in the editor matches that of the frontend, and the same is true for the typography, colors, and background.

The theme also ensures that the default Gutenberg blocks, i.e. quotes and galleries, will inherit Astra customizer styles to match the rest of the site.

Astra’s creators support the theme by offering commercial packages that include additional features and plugins, starter sites, add-ons for page builders, and support. They plan to offer additional Gutenberg features in commercial add-ons. Astra’s Ultimate Addons product will introduce custom blocks, such as Section, Heading, Info Box, Post Grid, Google Map, Table, Social Share, Menu, Buttons, along with pre-made starter templates.

After two months of weekend work, Anders Norén reported that all 18 of his free themes on WordPress.org have been updated to be compatible with Gutenberg. Norén’s popular minimalist style themes have a cumulative rating of 4.97 out of 5 stars and have been downloaded more than 2.2 million times. They are active on an estimated 100,000 WordPress installations.

“There are no custom blocks or other fancy stuff to be found in the updates, but if you’re running one of my themes, you should be able to update to WordPress 5.0 and start using Gutenberg without any hitches, in the editor or on the front-end,” Norén said. “If you plan to keep using the classic editor, things should look mostly the same after you install the update.”

The Gutenberg compatibility update for Norén’s themes includes editor styles, with layout, typography and colors matching the theme, styles for core blocks and new alignment options, and custom font sizes and color palette in the editor. Norén also took the opportunity to do an overall code cleanup and add improvements for older versions of PHP, accessibility and localization improvements, and bug fixes, amounting to 17,525 lines of code added or modified.

“The past couple of weekends have been grueling, but knowing that my themes will be ready for WordPress 5.0 – whether it hits the November 20th release date or not – was worth it,” Norén said.

Themeisle has updated Hestia with Gutenberg compatibility in the theme’s 2.0 release. The popular Material Design WordPress theme is the company’s flagship product and is installed on more than 100,000 WordPress sites. The company is planning to release a brand new theme that will be fully Gutenberg compatible. They have not yet announced if Zerif Lite (100,000+ installs) will be updated for the new editor.

Six weeks ago, searching the WordPress.org Theme Directory for “Gutenberg” produced 26 results where compatibility is mentioned in the theme descriptions. That number has jumped to 53. Support for the new editor seems to have happened much faster in the commercial theme space where searching for Gutenberg on Envato already turns up hundreds of results before the editor has even landed in core. Authors of free themes on WordPress.org don’t always have the same motivation. Those who support popular themes are more likely to have their themes compatible by the time WordPress 5.0 arrives, especially if the free theme is connected to a paid product.

Car Zymphonies Theme

Drupal Themes - Sun, 11/04/2018 - 02:41

Car Zymphonies Theme is our Mobile-first Drupal 8 responsive theme. This theme features a custom sideshow, responsive layout, multiple column layouts and is highly customizable. Read more

Live Demo Advanced Themes

Confidently showcase your new product within this bright, comprehensive Drupal responsive layout. Includes pricing grid, team section, featured elements, and social media sections.

Follow us in Twitter & Like us on Facebook to get free/premium theme updates, Drupal tips, tricks & news

Theme designed by FreeBiezz.com & developed by Zymphonies.com

Features

  • Drupal 8 core
  • Bootstrap v4
  • Font Awesome v5
  • Mobile-first responsive theme
  • Custom menu bar
  • Light weight theme
  • Fully responsive design
  • Included Sass & Compass source file
    • Colors are stored in Sass variable
    • Well organized Sass code
Banner Configuration

Banner can configure completely from theme settings page. It has control to upload image, add title and description etc.

Connect with Zymphonies Contact Zymphonies

Have Queries? Click here to contact Zymphonies

  • Free theme customisation & additional features
  • Drupal custom theme development
  • Drupal website design & development
  • Drupal website migration

Sponsored by Zymphonies

WPTavern: WPWeekly Episode 336 – Interview With Andrew Roberts, CEO and Co-founder of Tiny

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 11/02/2018 - 13:25

In this episode, John James Jacoby and I are joined by Andrew Roberts, CEO and Co-founder of Tiny. Tiny is the company behind the popular open source library TinyMCE. Roberts shares his entrepreneurial journey, what the company plans on doing with its recent round of funding, and the relationship between TinyMCE and Gutenberg.

Here is an excerpt from the show on what Roberts thinks about Gutenberg.

I think that ultimately Gutenberg will be more innovative than just incrementally changing from the old editor experience toward block-based editing.

I think you know Matt’s probably had a tough year with some of the criticisms around Gutenberg but I admire his courage and leadership because if he hadn’t put his brand equity on the line, if he hadn’t invested his goodwill in doing this, this would never be launching in a month from now.

There may be a painful year or two but in the grand scheme of things this will turn out for the better. It’s taken a lot of courage and bravery for him to do that. He’s taken a lot of shots in the back, but you know that’s why he gets paid the big bucks as they say.

Stories Discussed:

WordPress 5.0 Beta 1
WordPress Accessibility Team Delivers Sobering Assessment of Gutenberg: “We have to draw a line.”
WooCommerce 3.5 Introduces REST API v3, Improves Transactional Emails
WP Engine Acquires Array Themes

WPWeekly Meta:

Next Episode: Wednesday, November 7th 3:00 P.M. Eastern

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via Itunes

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via RSS

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via Stitcher Radio

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via Google Play

Listen To Episode #336:

ProboCI

Drupal Themes - Fri, 11/02/2018 - 12:35

This is where development of the Probo theme for Drupal will be housed. It is the themed used by the Probo Open Source Server package.

WPTavern: How to Add an Image to A Paragraph Block in Gutenberg

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 11/02/2018 - 11:35

WordPress 5.0 is on the horizon and with it comes a number of opportunities to explain how to get things done in the new editor.

Testing Scenario

A user has written three paragraphs and decides to add an image to the second paragraph. This user wants the image to be aligned to the right.

Accomplishing the Task in the Classic Editor

The classic editor is essentially one big block. Adding media to a paragraph is as quick as placing the mouse cursor at the beginning of a paragraph, clicking the add new media button, selecting or uploading an image, and choosing its alignment.

Accomplishing the Task in Gutenberg

In Gutenberg, each paragraph is a block and each block has its own toolbar. This is important because after writing three paragraphs, you can’t click on an add media button. Instead, you need to create an image block.

Once you’ve selected an image, you need to move the image block above the paragraph block where you want to insert it. At first, you might try to drag and drop the image into the paragraph but that doesn’t work. You need to use the up and down arrows or drag the block into position.

Once the image block is in the correct location, click the align right icon. The image will be inserted into the right side of the paragraph block.

A Right Aligned Image Inside of A Paragraph Block

If you want to move the image to a different paragraph block, you’ll need to click the Align center button which turns the image back into its own block and repeat the process described above.

Adding Images to Paragraphs in the Classic Editor Is Easier

The task I described above is one I think millions of users will have trouble completing when WordPress 5.0 is released. In the Classic editor, the writing flow doesn’t feel disjointed when you want to add images or embed content into posts.

In Gutenberg, everything is a block which in many cases, causes the flow to be disrupted as you need to figure out what block you need, how to manipulate it, where to move it, find where the options are, etc.

The process of adding images to paragraphs will likely improve after WordPress 5.0 is released but until then, the Classic editor wins this use case.

YG Restaurant Lite

Drupal Themes - Fri, 11/02/2018 - 06:50

WPTavern: Google’s reCAPTCHA v3 Promises a “Frictionless User Experience”

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 11/02/2018 - 00:09

Google introduced reCAPTCHA v3 this week, which promises a new “frictionless user experience.” Earlier versions of the API stopped bots but also drew the ire of internet users across the globe. Users were regularly inconvenienced with distorted text challenges, street sign puzzles, click requirements, and other actions to prove their humanity.

v3 offers a marked improvement by detecting bots in the background and returning a score that tells the admin if the interaction is suspicious. It scores traffic with its Adaptive Risk Analysis Engine instead of forcing human users to perform interactive challenges. The score can be used three different ways:

  • Set a threshold that determines when a user is let through or when further verification needs to be done, i.e. two-factor authentication or phone verification.
  • Combine the score with your own signals that reCAPTCHA can’t access, such as user profiles or transaction histories.
  • Use the reCAPTCHA score as one of the signals to train your machine learning model to fight abuse.

v3 give site owners more options to customize the thresholds and actions for different types of traffic. The video below explains how it works and the developer docs have more information on frontend integration and score interpretation.

Site owners can view their traffic in the reCAPTCHA admin console. It also displays a list of all of your sites and what version of the API they are using.

The admin console also has a form for registering new sites:

The WordPress Plugin Directory has dozens of standalone plugins and contact forms that make use of reCAPTCHA in some way. Sites that are already set up to use v2 or the Invisible CAPTCHA, will not automatically update to use v3. There’s a different signup and implementation process that the site owner has to perform before having it integrated on the site.

WordPress plugin developers who offer reCAPTCHA will have to decide if they want to update existing plugins to use v3 or package a v3 offering in a new plugin. The reCAPTCHA v1 API was shut down earlier this year in March. Google’s reCAPTCHA PHP client library on GitHub is still actively encouraging use of both v2 and v3. A date has not been announced for v2 to be deprecated.

Quarterly Updates | Q3 2018

Wordpress News - Thu, 11/01/2018 - 16:46

To keep everyone aware of big projects and efforts across WordPress contributor teams, I’ve reached out to each team’s listed representatives. I asked each of them to share their Top Priority (and when they hope for it to be completed), as well as their biggest Wins and Worries. Have questions? I’ve included a link to each team’s site in the headings.

Accessibility

  • Contacted: @joedolson, @audrasjb, @arush
  • Priority: Work on authoring a manual for assistive technology users on Gutenberg, led by Claire Brotherton (@abrightclearweb). Continue to work on improving the overall user experience in Gutenberg. Update and organize the WP A11y handbook.
  • Struggle: Lack of developers and accessibility experts to help test and code the milestone issues. Still over 100 outstanding issues, and developing the Gutenberg AT manual helps expose additional issues. The announcement of an accessibility focus on 4.9.9 derailed our planning for Gutenberg in September with minimal productivity, as that goal was quickly withdrawn from the schedule.
  • Big Win: Getting focus constraint implemented in popovers and similar components in Gutenberg.

CLI

  • Contacted: @danielbachhuber, @schlessera
  • Priority: Current priority is v2.1.0 of WP-CLI, to polish the major refactoring v2.0.0 introduced. You can join in or follow progress on their site.
  • Struggle: Getting enough contributors to make peer-review possible/manageable.
  • Big Win: The major refactoring of v2 was mostly without any negative impacts on existing installs. It provided substantial improvements to maintainability including: faster and more reliable testing, more straight-forward changes to individual packages, and simpler contributor on-boarding.

Community

Core

  • Contacted: @jeffpaul
  • Priority: Continued preparation for the 5.0 release cycle and Gutenberg.
  • Struggle: Identifying tasks for first time contributors, as well as for new-to-JS contributors.

Design

  • Contacted: @melchoyce, @karmatosed, @boemedia, @joshuawold, @mizejewski
  • Priority: Preparing for WordPress 5.0 and continuing to work on better onboarding practices.
  • Struggle: Identifying tasks for contributor days, especially for small- to medium-sized tasks that can be fit into a single day.
  • Big Win: Regular contributions are starting to build up.

Documentation

  • Contacted: @kenshino
  • Priority: Getting HelpHub out before WordPress 5.0’s launch to make sure Gutenberg User Docs have a permanent position to reside
  • Struggle: Getting the documentation from HelpHub into WordPress.org/support is more manual than initially anticipated.
  • Big Win: Had a good discussion with the Gutenberg team about their docs and how WordPress.org expects documentation to be distributed (via DevHub, Make and HelpHub). Getting past the code blocks to release HelpHub (soon)

Hosting

  • Contacted: @mikeschroder, @jadonn
  • Priority: Helping Gutenberg land well at hosts for users in 5.0.
  • Struggle: Short time frame with few resources to accomplish priority items.
  • Big Win: Preparing Try Gutenberg support guide for hosts during the rollout and good reception from users following it.

Marketing

  • Contacted: @bridgetwillard
  • Priority: Continuing to write and publish case studies from the community.
  • Big Win: Onboarding guide is going well and is currently being translated.

Meta (WordPress.org Site)

  • Contacted: @tellyworth, @coffee2code
  • Priority: Support for other teams in the lead up to, and the follow-up of, the release of WP 5.0. ETA is the WP 5.0 release date (Nov 19) and thereafter, unless it gets bumped to next quarter.
  • Struggle: Maintaining momentum on tickets (still).
  • Big Win: Launch of front-end demo of Gutenberg on https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/

Mobile

  • Contacted: @elibud
  • Priority: Have an alpha version of Gutenberg in the WordPress apps, ETA end of year 2018.
  • Struggle: Unfamiliar tech stack and the goal of reusing as much of Gutenberg-web’s code as possible.
  • Big Win: Running mobile tests on web’s PRs.

Plugins

  • Contacted: @ipstenu
  • Priority: Cleaning up ‘inactive’ users, which was supposed to be complete but some work preparing for 5.0 was necessary.
  • Struggles: Devnotes are lacking for the upcoming release which slows progress.
  • Big Win: No backlog even though a lot were out!

Polyglots

Support

  • Contacted: @clorith
  • Priority: Preparing for the upcoming 5.0 release
  • Struggle: Finding a good balance between how much we want to help people and how much we are able to help people. Also, contributor recruitment (always a crowd favorite!)
  • Big Win: How well the team, on a global level, has managed to maintain a good flow of user engagement through support.

Theme Review

  • Contacted: @acosmin, @rabmalin, @thinkupthemes, @williampatton
  • Priority: Implementing the Theme Sniffer plugin on WordPress.org which is one step forward towards automation. ETA early 2019
  • Struggle: Not having so many contributors/reviewers.
  • Big Win: Implementing multiple requirements into our review flow, like screenshots and readme.txt requirements.

Training

  • Contacted: @bethsoderberg, @juliek
  • Priority: Getting the learn.wordpress.org site designed, developed, and being able to publish lesson plans to it.
  • Struggle: Getting contributors onboard and continually contributing. Part of that is related to the learn.wordpress.org site. People like to see their contributions.
  • Big Win: We have our new workflow and tools in place. We are also streamlining that process to help things go from idea to publication more quickly.

Interested in updates from the last quarter? You can find those here: https://wordpress.org/news/2018/07/quarterly-updates-q2-2018/

Dev Blog: Quarterly Updates | Q3 2018

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 11/01/2018 - 16:46

To keep everyone aware of big projects and efforts across WordPress contributor teams, I’ve reached out to each team’s listed representatives. I asked each of them to share their Top Priority (and when they hope for it to be completed), as well as their biggest Wins and Worries. Have questions? I’ve included a link to each team’s site in the headings.

Accessibility

  • Contacted: @joedolson, @audrasjb, @arush
  • Priority: Work on authoring a manual for assistive technology users on Gutenberg, led by Claire Brotherton (@abrightclearweb). Continue to work on improving the overall user experience in Gutenberg. Update and organize the WP A11y handbook.
  • Struggle: Lack of developers and accessibility experts to help test and code the milestone issues. Still over 100 outstanding issues, and developing the Gutenberg AT manual helps expose additional issues. The announcement of an accessibility focus on 4.9.9 derailed our planning for Gutenberg in September with minimal productivity, as that goal was quickly withdrawn from the schedule.
  • Big Win: Getting focus constraint implemented in popovers and similar components in Gutenberg.

CLI

  • Contacted: @danielbachhuber, @schlessera
  • Priority: Current priority is v2.1.0 of WP-CLI, to polish the major refactoring v2.0.0 introduced. You can join in or follow progress on their site.
  • Struggle: Getting enough contributors to make peer-review possible/manageable.
  • Big Win: The major refactoring of v2 was mostly without any negative impacts on existing installs. It provided substantial improvements to maintainability including: faster and more reliable testing, more straight-forward changes to individual packages, and simpler contributor on-boarding.

Community

Core

  • Contacted: @jeffpaul
  • Priority: Continued preparation for the 5.0 release cycle and Gutenberg.
  • Struggle: Identifying tasks for first time contributors, as well as for new-to-JS contributors.

Design

  • Contacted: @melchoyce, @karmatosed, @boemedia, @joshuawold, @mizejewski
  • Priority: Preparing for WordPress 5.0 and continuing to work on better onboarding practices.
  • Struggle: Identifying tasks for contributor days, especially for small- to medium-sized tasks that can be fit into a single day.
  • Big Win: Regular contributions are starting to build up.

Documentation

  • Contacted: @kenshino
  • Priority: Getting HelpHub out before WordPress 5.0’s launch to make sure Gutenberg User Docs have a permanent position to reside
  • Struggle: Getting the documentation from HelpHub into WordPress.org/support is more manual than initially anticipated.
  • Big Win: Had a good discussion with the Gutenberg team about their docs and how WordPress.org expects documentation to be distributed (via DevHub, Make and HelpHub). Getting past the code blocks to release HelpHub (soon)

Hosting

  • Contacted: @mikeschroder, @jadonn
  • Priority: Helping Gutenberg land well at hosts for users in 5.0.
  • Struggle: Short time frame with few resources to accomplish priority items.
  • Big Win: Preparing Try Gutenberg support guide for hosts during the rollout and good reception from users following it.

Marketing

  • Contacted: @bridgetwillard
  • Priority: Continuing to write and publish case studies from the community.
  • Big Win: Onboarding guide is going well and is currently being translated.

Meta (WordPress.org Site)

  • Contacted: @tellyworth, @coffee2code
  • Priority: Support for other teams in the lead up to, and the follow-up of, the release of WP 5.0. ETA is the WP 5.0 release date (Nov 19) and thereafter, unless it gets bumped to next quarter.
  • Struggle: Maintaining momentum on tickets (still).
  • Big Win: Launch of front-end demo of Gutenberg on https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/

Mobile

  • Contacted: @elibud
  • Priority: Have an alpha version of Gutenberg in the WordPress apps, ETA end of year 2018.
  • Struggle: Unfamiliar tech stack and the goal of reusing as much of Gutenberg-web’s code as possible.
  • Big Win: Running mobile tests on web’s PRs.

Plugins

  • Contacted: @ipstenu
  • Priority: Cleaning up ‘inactive’ users, which was supposed to be complete but some work preparing for 5.0 was necessary.
  • Struggles: Devnotes are lacking for the upcoming release which slows progress.
  • Big Win: No backlog even though a lot were out!

Polyglots

Support

  • Contacted: @clorith
  • Priority: Preparing for the upcoming 5.0 release
  • Struggle: Finding a good balance between how much we want to help people and how much we are able to help people. Also, contributor recruitment (always a crowd favorite!)
  • Big Win: How well the team, on a global level, has managed to maintain a good flow of user engagement through support.

Theme Review

  • Contacted: @acosmin, @rabmalin, @thinkupthemes, @williampatton
  • Priority: Implementing the Theme Sniffer plugin on WordPress.org which is one step forward towards automation. ETA early 2019
  • Struggle: Not having so many contributors/reviewers.
  • Big Win: Implementing multiple requirements into our review flow, like screenshots and readme.txt requirements.

Training

  • Contacted: @bethsoderberg, @juliek
  • Priority: Getting the learn.wordpress.org site designed, developed, and being able to publish lesson plans to it.
  • Struggle: Getting contributors onboard and continually contributing. Part of that is related to the learn.wordpress.org site. People like to see their contributions.
  • Big Win: We have our new workflow and tools in place. We are also streamlining that process to help things go from idea to publication more quickly.

Interested in updates from the last quarter? You can find those here: https://wordpress.org/news/2018/07/quarterly-updates-q2-2018/

YG Bold

Drupal Themes - Thu, 11/01/2018 - 13:16

YG Bold is modern Drupal 8 theme developed to help you to create a stunning websites.

Features

  • Drupal 8 core
  • Bootstrap v3
  • Services
  • Product
  • Pricing
  • Testimonials

Download Demo Site

It is highly recommended to install the demo site and customize it to get the exact look. Here is the link for the documentation to install demo site

Demo login credentials : admin / admin@123

Thanks for checking out our theme. We can install the theme in your server for free!

Contact us for free installation


Other YG Business themes


Credits

Drupal theme by Young Globes

YG Glow

Drupal Themes - Thu, 11/01/2018 - 09:16

YG Glow is modern Drupal 8 theme developed to help you to create a stunning websites.

Features

  • Drupal 8 core
  • Bootstrap v3
  • Services
  • Portfolio
  • Blog
  • Testimonials

Live Demo Download Demo Site

It is highly recommended to install the demo site and customize it to get the exact look. Here is the link for the documentation to install demo site

Demo login credentials : admin / admin@123

Thanks for checking out our theme. We can install the theme in your server for free!

Contact us for free installation


Other YG Business themes


Credits

Drupal theme by Young Globes

The Month in WordPress: October 2018

Wordpress News - Thu, 11/01/2018 - 08:40

Teams across the WordPress project are working hard to make sure everything is ready for the upcoming release of WordPress 5.0. Find out what’s going on and how you can get involved.

The Plan for WordPress 5.0

Early this month, the planned release schedule was announced for WordPress 5.0, which was updated a few weeks later. WordPress 5.0 is a highly anticipated release, as it’s the official  launch of Gutenberg — the new block editor for WordPress Core. For more detail, check out this  granular timeline.

Along with the planned release schedule, @matt, who is heading up this release, announced leads for critical focuses on the project, including @matveb, @karmatosed, @laurelfulford, @allancole, @lonelyvegan, @omarreiss, @antpb, @pento, @chanthaboune, @danielbachhuber, and @mcsf.

WordPress 5.0 is currently in its second beta phase and will soon move to the release candidate status. Help test this release right now by installing the WordPress Beta Tester plugin on your site.

Want to get involved in building WordPress Core? Follow the Core team blog and join the #core channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. You can also help out by testing or translating the release into a local language.

New Editor for WordPress Core

Active development continues on Gutenberg, the new editing experience for WordPress Core. The latest release is feature complete, meaning that all further development on it will be to improve existing features and fix outstanding bugs.

Some have raised concerns about Gutenberg’s accessibility, prompting the development team to detail some areas in which the new editor is accessible. To help improve things further, the team has made a public call for accessibility testers to assist.

Want to get involved in building Gutenberg? Follow the Gutenberg tag on the Core team blog and join the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. Read this guide to find areas where you can have the most impact.

Migrating HelpHub to WordPress.org

HelpHub is an ongoing project to move all of WordPress’ user documentation from the Codex to the WordPress Support portal.

HelpHub has been developed on a separate staging server and it’s now time to migrate the new documentation to its home on WordPress.org. The plan is to have everything moved over  before WordPress 5.0 is released, so that all the new documentation will be available on the new platform from the start.

The HelpHub team has published a call for volunteers to help with the migration. If you would like to get involved, join the #docs channel in the Making WordPress Slack group, and contact @atachibana to get started.

A New Default Theme for WordPress

A brand new default theme — Twenty Nineteen — has been announced with development being led by @allancole. The theme is packaged with WordPress 5.0, so it will be following the same release schedule as Core.

The new theme is designed to integrate seamlessly with Gutenberg and showcase how you can build a theme alongside the new block editor and take advantage of the creative freedom that it offers.

Want to help build Twenty Nineteen? Join in on the theme’s GitHub repo and join the #core-themes channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

Further Reading:
  • The Support team are putting together more formal Support Guidelines for the WordPress Support Forums.
  • The group focused on privacy tools in Core has released some details on the work they have been doing recently, with a roadmap for their plans over the next few months.
  • The Core team released an update about how WordPress will be compatible with PHP 7.3.
  • The Theme Review Team have published some new requirements regarding child themes, readme files and trusted authors in the Theme Directory.
  • The WordCamp Europe team are working on a PWA service for all WordCamp websites.

If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.

Dev Blog: The Month in WordPress: October 2018

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 11/01/2018 - 08:40

Teams across the WordPress project are working hard to make sure everything is ready for the upcoming release of WordPress 5.0. Find out what’s going on and how you can get involved.

The Plan for WordPress 5.0

Early this month, the planned release schedule was announced for WordPress 5.0, which was updated a few weeks later. WordPress 5.0 is a highly anticipated release, as it’s the official  launch of Gutenberg — the new block editor for WordPress Core. For more detail, check out this  granular timeline.

Along with the planned release schedule, @matt, who is heading up this release, announced leads for critical focuses on the project, including @matveb, @karmatosed, @laurelfulford, @allancole, @lonelyvegan, @omarreiss, @antpb, @pento, @chanthaboune, @danielbachhuber, and @mcsf.

WordPress 5.0 is currently in its second beta phase and will soon move to the release candidate status. Help test this release right now by installing the WordPress Beta Tester plugin on your site.

Want to get involved in building WordPress Core? Follow the Core team blog and join the #core channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. You can also help out by testing or translating the release into a local language.

New Editor for WordPress Core

Active development continues on Gutenberg, the new editing experience for WordPress Core. The latest release is feature complete, meaning that all further development on it will be to improve existing features and fix outstanding bugs.

Some have raised concerns about Gutenberg’s accessibility, prompting the development team to detail some areas in which the new editor is accessible. To help improve things further, the team has made a public call for accessibility testers to assist.

Want to get involved in building Gutenberg? Follow the Gutenberg tag on the Core team blog and join the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. Read this guide to find areas where you can have the most impact.

Migrating HelpHub to WordPress.org

HelpHub is an ongoing project to move all of WordPress’ user documentation from the Codex to the WordPress Support portal.

HelpHub has been developed on a separate staging server and it’s now time to migrate the new documentation to its home on WordPress.org. The plan is to have everything moved over  before WordPress 5.0 is released, so that all the new documentation will be available on the new platform from the start.

The HelpHub team has published a call for volunteers to help with the migration. If you would like to get involved, join the #docs channel in the Making WordPress Slack group, and contact @atachibana to get started.

A New Default Theme for WordPress

A brand new default theme — Twenty Nineteen — has been announced with development being led by @allancole. The theme is packaged with WordPress 5.0, so it will be following the same release schedule as Core.

The new theme is designed to integrate seamlessly with Gutenberg and showcase how you can build a theme alongside the new block editor and take advantage of the creative freedom that it offers.

Want to help build Twenty Nineteen? Join in on the theme’s GitHub repo and join the #core-themes channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

Further Reading:
  • The Support team are putting together more formal Support Guidelines for the WordPress Support Forums.
  • The group focused on privacy tools in Core has released some details on the work they have been doing recently, with a roadmap for their plans over the next few months.
  • The Core team released an update about how WordPress will be compatible with PHP 7.3.
  • The Theme Review Team have published some new requirements regarding child themes, readme files and trusted authors in the Theme Directory.
  • The WordCamp Europe team are working on a PWA service for all WordCamp websites.

If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.

WPTavern: Gutenberg Cloud Plugin for WordPress is Now in Beta

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 10/31/2018 - 23:12

Frontkom, the team behind the Gutenberg Cloud project, has published the beta version of its WordPress plugin to the official repository. Cloud Blocks serves as a connector, allowing WordPress users to browse and install open source blocks from Gutenberg Cloud. The blocks are hosted on NPM and their assets are served from CloudFlare using unpkg.com.

Gutenberg Cloud’s online library of blocks is CMS agnostic, offering blocks for both Drupal and WordPress sites, and more CMSs in the future. The service advertises three key benefits for developers who host blocks on Gutenberg Cloud:

  • Wider adoption: Your blocks can be used outside of WP
  • Discoverability: Your blocks will pop up in the Cloud Blocks UI
  • Faster development: No plugin/SVN needed, just publish to NPM

Frontkom is actively recruiting WordPress developers to add blocks to the cloud to test the process. Documentation for migrating blocks from a plugin is available on GitHub. Frontkom has also produced a new boilerplate generator for building Gutenberg Cloud blocks.

Users should note that the team is still ironing out the experience for developers adding blocks to the cloud, so the plugin isn’t yet ready for general use. It’s currently under active development.

WordPress Developers Say Gutenberg Cloud May Not be the Best Way to Release Blocks but Platform has Potential

I contacted some WordPress developers who have tested sending their blocks to Gutenberg Cloud to get their initial reactions to the platform.

“The idea that folks will be able to install blocks a la carte is interesting,” CoBlocks author and ThemeBeans founder Rich Tabor said. “It’s pretty much as easy as installing plugins.”

Tabor experimented with migrating his Block Gallery blocks and said the process was not difficult but he foresees difficulties in maintaining blocks across parent plugins and Gutenberg Cloud.

“As a developer, I’m still not entirely convinced Gutenberg Cloud is the best way to release blocks, aside from relatively simple blocks,” Tabor said. “I personally lean towards building suites of blocks that share a relative purpose, instead of one plugin (or one Cloud Block instance) per block. For one, it cuts down on maintenance quite a bit, as custom components can be shared between blocks. And there’s much better discoverability on getting relative blocks in the hands of users — if they’re grouped together.”

Block collections have been criticized for making it difficult to search for and discover individual blocks, but Tabor makes some good arguments for improving block discoverability by grouping together features users often need. That is the whole point of successful plugins like Jetpack, but this type of packaging also lends itself to criticism about bloat.

“It’s a similar conundrum when we look at grouped/not grouped shortcode plugins,” Tabor said. “I suppose the main difference is that the nature of blocks is much more complicated than that of shortcodes. History seems to repeat itself.”

Tabor said he is considering distributing a few of his free blocks through Gutenberg Cloud but he hasn’t fully decided yet.

WordPress core contributor, Josh Pollock, who has worked extensively with React and Gutenberg, also tested the Gutenberg Cloud platform. He said he thinks it has a lot of potential for developers who write blocks that are mainly JavaScript already.

“I could see how an agency that builds WordPress sites could save a lot of time and hassle building out a block library,” Pollock said. “As a plugin developer with a lot of little ideas, the pain and time of setting up a block and block environment, which no one has gotten right yet, makes me very excited about this.”

Pollock also reported a positive experience with the create-cloud-block generator.

“The code that create-cloud-block generates is well-written, but not too opinionated,” Pollock said. “The developer experience is both really cool — you preview your block in a functional Gutenberg-powered editor with no WordPress site attached — and a little frustrating as there is no live reload yet. I know they are just getting started and the tool doesn’t lock you into any structure, which is great. I’ll be keeping my eye on this project.”

Frontkom CTO Per André Rønsen said his team will continue testing the cloud internally until they get more developer feedback on the corresponding WordPress plugin. For Drupal users, Gutenberg Cloud will be shipped as a submodule of Gutenberg, which means all sites that install Gutenberg will also get the Cloud module. It can, however, be disabled. Rønsen said his team plans to showcase Gutenberg Cloud for D8 at DrupalCamp Oslo in November.

Matt: What’s in My Bag, 2018 Edition

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 10/31/2018 - 03:44
  1. SDR Kashmir Travel Folio, made with this super-cool material called Dyneema, which is twice as strong as Kevlar and 15 times as strong as steel, but virtually weightless.
  2. Garmin Forerunner 935 which is a triathlon watch, so it can tell me how much I don’t run, how much I don’t bike, and how much I don’t swim. Crazy sensors on it, and it’s lighter than an Apple Watch, which I tried again to use this year but wasn’t able to handle another device in my life that I had to charge daily. It has a weird charger, pictured next to it, but only needs charging once every few weeks so I don’t mind at all.
  3. This is the latest 15” grey touchbar MacBook Pro, customized by Uncover to have the Jetpack logo on it. I like the keyboard quietness and performance improvements of latest generation.
  4. Fit Pack 2 from Aer is the same I wrote a whole blog post about last year, and I still love and adore it every day. They have a few bigger and smaller packs, but the quality is just fantastic and I love all the pockets. Mine is starting to tear a little bit by one of the shoulder straps, but I do keep ~18lbs in it regularly.
  5. This is a grey wool buff, which works as a scarf, a hat, or an eye cover if I’m trying to sleep. I tried this out because of one of Tynan’s also-great gear posts.
  6. Passport, because you never know when you’ll need to leave the country.
  7. Kindle Oasis with this random case on it. I dig that this one is apparently waterproof — which I’ve never tested — but doesn’t feel like we’ve found the perfect size and weight balance yet. Reading is my favorite activity right now so this is my most-loved item.
  8. Imazing 10k charger. Great capacity, charges via USB-C. (2nd year)
  9. I’ve started carrying around some stationery so I can write notes to people when I’m on the road. Now I just need better handwriting…
  10. Delfonics is a funky-cool Japanese stationery, and this 3”x4” Rollbahn notebook is tops, and actually fits in my pocket. The Amazon one linked might be larger, I found it at Paper-Ya on Granville Island.
  11. A small leather bracelet I got in Seoul, Korea.
  12. Two things here: a rolled-up chamois cloth for cleaning glasses, inspired by my late friend Dean, and a WordPress ring I wear sometimes.
  13. Three pens here: A cool customized one we did for Automatticians; a Lamy Accent 4pen which has red, blue, black, and a mechanical pencil built in; a Sharpie for signing stuff.
  14. Have gone away from the carbon fiber clip and now using this small Paul Smith card wallet.
  15. Apple Magic Mouse 2. When this one breaks I’ll switch it out for a black one.
  16. Charger for the MacBook Pro.
  17. A super small international adapter, which is also nice for converting the 3-prong in the next item into a 2-prong. It’s Lenmar but I’m not going to link Amazon because they’re charging too much, just picked up in an airport store.
  18. Probably my favorite new item of the year: I have given Native Union a hard time in the past but super love this combo extension cord and USB charger. It is an 8-foot extension cord, which is remarkably handy, has two AC outlets, 3 USB ports, and one USB-C. Total life-saver.
  19. A dyneema accessory pouch, retaW aoyama / tokyo fragrance lipcream, Aveda Peppymint breath refresher, Aesop Ginger Flight Therapy roller, a spray hand cleanser, and Mintia COLDSMASH.
  20. District Vision makes these these running sunglasses in Japan, which I found at the Snow Peak store in NYC.
  21. These sunglasses are a collaboration between Salt and Aether.
  22. A single-use packet of Sriracha. Hot sauce in your bag? Swag.
  23. A palo santo smudge stick, smells great when you burn it. I’m turning into a hippie.
  24. Hermes business card holder.
  25. iPhone XS with a Jetpack Popsocket.
  26. Pixel 2, now replaced by a Pixel 3 XL.
  27. This is a bag with some small opals I gave as a Burning Man gift.
  28. iPad Pro 10.5 and Apple sleeve with Pencil holder, which is still one of my favorite gadgets of the year. Everything about this device just works and is a pleasure to use, and I’ve already ordered the new 11″ Pro and related accessories.
  29. Half meter (the perfect size) lightning cable.
  30. Apple USB-C dongle.
  31. Cool multi-function USB cable with lightning, two micro-USBs, and USB-C. I give these away all the time now and it’s nice to pair with the battery in #8 because I know I can charge anybody with this thing.
  32. Short USB-C.
  33. Combo micro-USB and Lightning.
  34. Short lightning cable, just like 29.
  35. Velcro cable ties, great for tidying pretty much anything. I just take a few out of the big pack and roll them up to travel with.
  36. Retractable USB-C, don’t love these as they break but it’s the best of what’s out there.
  37. USB-C to Lightning, great for super-fast charging.
  38. My favorite USB-C hub so far, the Satechi Aluminum Type-C Multimedia Adapter with 4K HDMI, Mini DP, USB-C PD, Gigabit Ethernet, USB 3.0, Micro/SD Card Slots. Pretty much everything you could possibly need.
  39. A pretty handy Ventev dashport car port charger that’s small and light. (2nd year)
  40. A few spare SIM cards, some SD cards, thingy to poke SIM card holder, and combo USB-C / USB-A 64gb stick.
  41. Lockpick set. (4th year)
  42. Bragi Pro custom earphones. For many years I had custom in-ear monitors, but the convenience of wireless overcame that, even before they started taking headphone jacks out of phones. Bragi now allows you to send in ear molds from an audiologist and they’ll make these custom true wireless headphones that fit and sound great, but I have trouble recommending because the case is so heavy and once got so jammed I almost thought I’d have to throw the whole thing away, and the app has never been able to “connect” for me because it gets stuck on turning on some fitness sensors. If it could connect I think I could turn off the other feature that is annoying, which is the touch controls that I find get triggered by my hat or when my head is against a chair. So, a qualified “maybe try this.”
  43. Sennheiser Culture Series Wideband Headset, which I use for podcasts, Skype, Facetime, Zoom, and Google Hangout calls with external folks and teams inside of Automattic. Light, comfortable, great sound quality, and great at blocking out background noise so you don’t annoy other people on the call. I’d love to replace this with something wireless but haven’t found one with as high fidelity audio.
  44. GL.iNet GL-AR750 Travel AC Router which I use to create wifi networks different places I go, which is often faster than hotel/etc wifi, and I can also VPN encrypt all my traffic through it. Pretty handy! But not user-friendly. Often keep it in my suitcase and not my backpack. I have a retractable Ethernet and micro-USB attached to it.
  45. Matte black Airpods. I love Airpods and these look super cool, I think these were from BlackPods which looks shut down now but Colorware has some alternatives. (2nd year)
  46. Westone ES49 custom earplugs, for if I go to concerts or anyplace overly loud. (4th year)
  47. An ultralight running jacket I think I got at Lululemon Lab in Vancouver. They don’t have anything like it available online right now but it folds up ultra-tiny, weighs nothing, and is a nice layer for on an airplane. My only complaint (as with all Lululemon products) is the low quality of the zipper. (2nd year)

That’s it for this year. As a bonus I’ll link some of my favorite other-bag items including toiletries: Muji dopp kit bag, these amazing travel bottles for creams, travel atomizer, Elysium Basis, Muji q-tips, Aesop Two Minds Facial Hydrator, Sunleya Sun Care SPF 15, folding brush / comb, Philips Sonicare Brush, Aesop toothpaste, Tom’s SLS-free toothpaste, Orabrush cleaner.

If you’re curious, here are the previous years: 2014, 2016, 2017.

If you have any questions please leave them in the comments!

Pages