Wordpress News

Intercept Base

Drupal Themes - Tue, 03/06/2018 - 04:12

Intercept Base is a base theme meant for use with Intercept, a suite of modules for managing events.

This project is currently under active development and is not meant for production use.

YG Launcher | Countdown Drupal 8 theme

Drupal Themes - Mon, 03/05/2018 - 11:10

Stylish coming soon Drupal 8 theme which contains countdown.

Features

  • Drupal 8 core
  • Bootstrap v3.3.5
  • Launch time count down
  • Collect email to notify on launch
  • All values can be changed in theme settings

Live Demo Download Demo Site

It is highly recommended to install the demo site and customize it to get the exact look. Here is the link for the documentation to install demo site


Other YG themes

  • YG Booster: A free bootstrap based Drupal 8 theme with modern design for products and business
  • YG Newage: an app landing page theme built using bootstrap
  • YG Agency: Theme perfect for portfolio and agency websites


Credits

HTML by Freehtml5.co &  Drupal theme by Young Globes

UnixTheme

Drupal Themes - Sun, 03/04/2018 - 22:35

Drupal 7 custom theme

Creative

Drupal Themes - Sun, 03/04/2018 - 16:33

Creative is a one page Bootstrap theme for creatives, small businesses, and other multipurpose uses. The theme includes a number of rich features and plugins that you can use as a great boilerplate for your next Bootstrap based project!\

Github Repo Link -https://github.com/ankitjain28may/startbootstrap-creative
Youtube Video Link - https://youtu.be/Ckvxj9vHp2g
Demo Link - http://creative-theme.herokuapp.com/

Qatar Zymphonies Theme

Drupal Themes - Sat, 03/03/2018 - 17:58

Qatar Zymphonies Theme is a free mobile-first Bootstrap 4 theme. It has many useful features. It has latest Bootstrap and Font Awesome framework. Qatar Zymphonies Theme is completely free and it can be used by world wide Drupal users.

Live Demo Advanced Themes

Follow us in Twitter & Like us on Facebook to get free/premium theme updates, Drupal tips, tricks & news

Theme designed by FreeBiezz.com & developed by Zymphonies.com

Features

  • Bootstrap v4
  • Font Awesome v5
  • Mobile-first theme
  • Custom menu bar
  • Sticky header
  • In-build slider
  • Light weight theme
  • Fully responsive design
  • More informations in header
    • Quick contact details
    • Social media links
  • Included Sass & Compass source file
    • Colors are stored in Sass variable
    • Well organized Sass code
  • Custom slider - Unlimited image upload
Slider/Banner Configuration

Slider can configure completely from theme settings page. It has control to specify no of required slides, upload image, add title and description etc.

Connect with Zymphonies Contact Zymphonies

Have Queries? Click here to contact Zymphonies

  • Free theme customization & additional features
  • Drupal custom theme development
  • Drupal website design & development
  • Drupal website migration

Sponsored by Zymphonies

WPTavern: New Plugin Makes WordPress Core Updates More Secure by Requiring Cryptographic Signature Verification

Wordpress Planet - Sat, 03/03/2018 - 00:56

In 2016, WordFence published their findings of a vulnerability that could have compromised the servers that are used to send out WordPress updates. It turned out to be a complex, obscure vulnerability that ignited a conversation surrounding the security of api.wordpress.org and what could happen if the servers were compromised.

One idea that was brought forth is to digitally sign WordPress core, theme, and plugin updates. For at least five years, a trac ticket has laid semi-dormant with this idea in mind.

Fifteen months ago, Scott Arciszewski, Chief Development Officer for Paragon Initiative Enterprises, who is most widely known for his cryptography engineering work, published an article that has since been taken down, expressing his strong desire for Matt Mullenweg to make secure cryptographic signatures a priority. Mullenweg responded to his post with one of his own stating that although WordPress update signing is important, it’s not a high priority.

“We will at some point; as said above it’s a good idea — can’t hurt, might help,” Mullenweg responded when asked if WordPress was ever going to do update signing. “There are, however, some more important security issues in front of it, that impact millions of sites in the real world, so we are prioritizing those issues above a nice-to-have, defense in-depth effort.”

Eric Mann Launches Secure WordPress Updates Plugin

While WordPress does not digitally sign updates, Eric Mann, founder of Displace Technologies, LLC, has created and released a new plugin that adds code signing to WordPress core updates. It’s called DGXPCO or Digital Guarantees for eXplicitly Permitted Core Operations. You’ll find it on the plugin directory by searching for DGXPCO.

When installed and activated, the plugin integrates with the core updater and requires that any core update must have a valid signature before it can be installed. The signature provides a secondary source of truth that confirms the integrity of the files. The signatures are created using a Ed25519 public/private keypair and Libsodium to sign the files’ contents.

Mann keeps the private key offline and has published the public key online. The public key will not change and if a core update is signed by a different key, it is a red flag and the update should be avoided. In addition, commits made to the release hashes repository on GitHub are signed with Mann’s PGP key to verify that he is the one who added new code.

Mann admits that the solution is not fool-proof and is working towards improving it. In future versions, the plugin will only notify the user of a WordPress core update if a digital signature is available. Plugins and themes are on the roadmap as well with the ability to opt-in.

Although he is the only person allowed to digitally sign packages, the model is not sustainable.

“As I prove out the update system, I’ll also begin adding sets of public keys that are scoped to specific sets of packages,” Mann said. “This will, for example, allow me to whitelist a small number of trusted developers to also sign core packages. It might also empower plugin developers to sign their own releases (but not anyone else’s).”

Mann is seeking feedback and is hoping the project provides evidence that something like it can be added to WordPress core.

Post Status: Marketing and positioning WordPress products — Draft podcast

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 03/02/2018 - 20:24

Welcome to the Post Status Draft podcast, which you can find on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, and via RSS for your favorite podcatcher. Post Status Draft is hosted by Brian Krogsgard and co-host Brian Richards.

This week BK and BR discuss a number of different aspects surrounding marketing and selling WordPress products and services. The conversation flows from selling benefits vs features, to social proof, to marketing and conversion funnels, to understanding and reacting to the problem space, to customer support, and many things in between. Whether you’re already selling products or services, about to sell something, or routinely buy things, there’s likely something for you in this episode.

Links Sponsor: SiteGround

SiteGround is engineered for speed, built for security, and crafted for WordPress. They offer feature-rich managed WordPress hosting with premium support, and are officially recommended by WordPress.org. Check out SiteGround’s website for a special deal for Post Status listeners, and thanks to SiteGround for being a Post Status partner.

Revel

Drupal Themes - Fri, 03/02/2018 - 18:31

YG Agency

Drupal Themes - Fri, 03/02/2018 - 13:18

Coming soon!!

WPTavern: 4,500 Plugins Need Your Help in Determining Gutenberg Compatibility

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 03/02/2018 - 00:57

One of the keys to a successful roll out of Gutenberg is plugin compatibility. Without it, users will experience unnecessary frustration and hamper enthusiasm of the new editor. In an effort to figure out what plugins are already compatible with Gutenberg, Daniel Bachhuber has created a Gutenberg Plugin Compatibility Database.

Gutenberg Plugin Compatibility Database

The database contains 5,000 plugins that represent more than 90% of the total active install count. Plugins are compatible with Gutenberg if they meet the following two requirements.

  • A WordPress user can perform the same functional task with Gutenberg active. For instance, if the plugin includes an ‘Add Media’ button, it’s considered Gutenberg-compatible when it has a block registered for the Gutenberg inserter.
  • There are no (obvious) errors when the WordPress plugin is active alongside Gutenberg.

In order to participate in the testing process, you’ll need to register an account on the site. Once approved, testers will be able to create a fresh sandboxed WordPress install on the site and test randomly selected plugins. After a manual review is complete, plugins will be marked as is_compatible=yes or is_compatible=no.

Some plugins are already classified with is_compatible=likely_yes or is_compatible=likely_. As reports are completed, two pie charts that display compatibility results at the bottom of the site update automatically.

Bachhuber estimates that if each plugin takes about a minute to test, they’ll need roughly 75 person-hours to get through the remaining 4,500 plugins in the database. This project is a great opportunity for individuals and businesses to contribute back to WordPress via the Five for The Future initiative.

Ideal testers are those who can review dozens of plugins, but even reviewing a few will help the project. If you’re interested in contributing, check out the project’s GitHub page to learn what’s involved in the testing process. Alternatively, visitors can watch the following YouTube video.

Dev Blog: The Month in WordPress: February 2018

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 03/01/2018 - 08:41

Judging by the flurry of activity across the WordPress project throughout February, it looks like everyone is really getting into the swing of things for 2018. There have been a lot of interesting new developments, so read on to see what the community has been up to for the past month.

WordPress 4.9.3 & 4.9.4

Early in the month, version 4.9.3 of WordPress was released, including a number of important bug fixes. Unfortunately it introduced a bug that prevented many sites from automatically updating to future releases. To remedy this issue, version 4.9.4 was released the following day requiring many people to manually update their sites.

While this kind of issue is always regrettable, the good thing is that it was fixed quickly, and that not all sites had updated to 4.9.3 yet, which meant they bypassed the bug in that version.

You can find out more technical information about this issue on the Core development blog.

The WordCamp Incubator is Back

In 2016, the Global Community Team ran an experimental program to help spread WordPress to underserved areas by providing more significant organizing support for their first WordCamp event. This program was dubbed the WordCamp Incubator, and it was so successful in the three cities where it ran that the program is back for 2018.

Right now, the Community Team is looking for cities to be a part of this year’s incubator by taking applications. Additionally, each incubator community will need an experienced WordCamp organizer to assist them as a co-lead organizer for their event — if that sounds interesting to you, then you can fill in the application form for co-leads.

You can find out further information about the WordCamp Incubator on the Community Team blog.

WordPress Meetup Roundtables scheduled for March

In order to assist local WordPress meetup organizers with running their meetup groups, some members of the Community Team have organized weekly meetup roundtable discussions through the month of March.

These will be run as video chats at 16:00 UTC every Wednesday this month and will be a great place for meetup organizers to come together and help each other out with practical ideas and advice.

If you are not already in the WordPress meetup program and would like to join, you can find out more information in the WordPress Meetup Organizer Handbook.

GDPR Compliance in WordPress Core

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is an upcoming regulation that will affect all online services across Europe. In order to prepare for this, a working group has been formed to make sure that WordPress is compliant with the GDPR regulations.

Aside from the fact that this will be a requirement for the project going forward, it will also have an important and significant impact on the privacy and security of WordPress as a whole. The working group has posted their proposed roadmap for this project and it looks very promising.

To get involved in building WordPress Core, jump into the #gdpr-compliance channel in the Making WordPress Slack group, and follow the Core team blog.

Further Reading:

If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.

The Month in WordPress: February 2018

Wordpress News - Thu, 03/01/2018 - 08:41

Judging by the flurry of activity across the WordPress project throughout February, it looks like everyone is really getting into the swing of things for 2018. There have been a lot of interesting new developments, so read on to see what the community has been up to for the past month.

WordPress 4.9.3 & 4.9.4

Early in the month, version 4.9.3 of WordPress was released, including a number of important bug fixes. Unfortunately it introduced a bug that prevented many sites from automatically updating to future releases. To remedy this issue, version 4.9.4 was released the following day requiring many people to manually update their sites.

While this kind of issue is always regrettable, the good thing is that it was fixed quickly, and that not all sites had updated to 4.9.3 yet, which meant they bypassed the bug in that version.

You can find out more technical information about this issue on the Core development blog.

The WordCamp Incubator is Back

In 2016, the Global Community Team ran an experimental program to help spread WordPress to underserved areas by providing more significant organizing support for their first WordCamp event. This program was dubbed the WordCamp Incubator, and it was so successful in the three cities where it ran that the program is back for 2018.

Right now, the Community Team is looking for cities to be a part of this year’s incubator by taking applications. Additionally, each incubator community will need an experienced WordCamp organizer to assist them as a co-lead organizer for their event — if that sounds interesting to you, then you can fill in the application form for co-leads.

You can find out further information about the WordCamp Incubator on the Community Team blog.

WordPress Meetup Roundtables scheduled for March

In order to assist local WordPress meetup organizers with running their meetup groups, some members of the Community Team have organized weekly meetup roundtable discussions through the month of March.

These will be run as video chats at 16:00 UTC every Wednesday this month and will be a great place for meetup organizers to come together and help each other out with practical ideas and advice.

If you are not already in the WordPress meetup program and would like to join, you can find out more information in the WordPress Meetup Organizer Handbook.

GDPR Compliance in WordPress Core

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is an upcoming regulation that will affect all online services across Europe. In order to prepare for this, a working group has been formed to make sure that WordPress is compliant with the GDPR regulations.

Aside from the fact that this will be a requirement for the project going forward, it will also have an important and significant impact on the privacy and security of WordPress as a whole. The working group has posted their proposed roadmap for this project and it looks very promising.

To get involved in building WordPress Core, jump into the #gdpr-compliance channel in the Making WordPress Slack group, and follow the Core team blog.

Further Reading:

If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.

YG Newage

Drupal Themes - Thu, 03/01/2018 - 07:54

YG Newage is an app landing page theme built using bootstrap. This theme features a bold, colorful design with various content sections that will be an excellent boilerplate for your next project. This theme is built using paragraph module, so the sections can be added as many time as needed. You can easily rearrange sections as per your needs.

Features

  • Drupal 8 core
  • Bootstrap v3.3.5
  • Multi-level drop down menus
  • Modern design with flat elements
  • Font awesome icons
  • Built with paragraph module

Live Demo Download Demo Site

It is highly recommended to install the demo site and customize it to get the exact look. Here is the link for the documentation to install demo site

Credits

Theme designed by startbootstrap & developed by Young Globes

WPTavern: WPWeekly Episode 306 – AMP, GDPR, and Brewing Beer At The Boss’ House

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 03/01/2018 - 02:19

In this episode, John James Jacoby joins me live from Hutchinson, KS, to talk about the news of the week. We started off the show discussing the GDPR and the number of things that need to be considered surrounding the right to be forgotten.

We also have a lengthy conversation about AMP, the open web, and Automattic’s relationship with Google. Last but not least, we discussed Automattic’s recent hiring of Kinsey Wilson to be president of the company.

Stories Discussed:

Matt Cromwell Hosts Matt Mullenweg in Q&A Gutenberg Interview
New Team Forms to Facilitate GDPR Compliance in WordPress Core
For one-time NPR and NYT digital chief, a new adventure: WordPress

WPWeekly Meta:

Next Episode: Wednesday, March 7th 3:00 P.M. Eastern

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via Itunes

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via RSS

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via Stitcher Radio

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via Google Play

Listen To Episode #306:

HeroPress: Changes Coming To HeroPress

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 02/28/2018 - 12:00

Over the last few months, I’ve been having some deep talks with my HeroPress partner about what the future of HeroPress looks like. We came up with some changes that feel deeply satisfying. Changes we think should help HeroPress, help readers, and help us as content producers. So here we go.

Financial Changes

At various times in the past people have told me that the time I spend on HeroPress is worth compensation. When I first started it as a blog, I had no intention of getting money from it. However, being compensated for my time helped ease the burden on my family.

With that in mind, last fall I test-drove a donation page based on interest from some in the community.

It was a good idea, and I’m thankful for the support I received, but for now it’s not the right path.

So, I’ve pulled the donation page from the site and am no longer accepting site sponsors. You’ll notice I do have a Sponsorship page, but it lists organizations that have made material contributions like hosting, plugins, etc.

Content Changes

We’ve been publishing every Wednesday for several years now. Over time, readership has climbed quite a bit. That’s great, but it means that many current readers have never seen the earlier content, which remains quite evergreen.

To address this, we’re going to do new HeroPress essays once a month. The other weeks of the month will be replays of earlier essays.

This allows for some breathing room in gathering new contributors and brings back some really great content that shouldn’t be forgotten.

It also opens up my time to explore the community more. To see if there are new ways that people, particularly on the fringe, can be helped. Sharing stories is useful, but are there other opportunities and needs we’re missing?

The Future

So HeroPress will continue. I still love doing it. At various times we’ve discussed making it bigger, doing grand things. But not now. For now we’re going to let it grow organically and continue letting it serve its purpose: to give voice to WordPress stories, to make them known, to inspire.

The post Changes Coming To HeroPress appeared first on HeroPress.

WPTavern: New Team Forms to Facilitate GDPR Compliance in WordPress Core

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 02/27/2018 - 23:20

As May 25th, the enforcement date for the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) draws near, individuals and businesses are scrambling to make sure they’re compliant. I’ve read a number of blog posts throughout the WordPress community explaining the GDPR and what needs to be done for compliance and it’s a tough thing to grasp.

The EU GDPR was designed to harmonize data privacy laws across Europe, protect and empower European citizens data privacy, and reshape the way organizations across the region approach data privacy. In reading the regulation and various blog posts, the terminology makes it appear that the changes are geared towards large, international businesses that process personal data.

However, according to Heather Burns, a digital law specialist in Glasgow, Scotland, the GDPR affects sites large and small.

GDPR applies to all businesses, organizations, sectors, situations, and scenarios, regardless of a business’s size, head count, or financial turnover. A small app studio is every bit as beholden to these rules as a large corporation.

Determining if your site needs to be compliant and how to accomplish it can be overwhelming. If you do business in Europe or collect data from European users, you must protect that data in accordance with the GDPR as if you were in Europe. For example, if you operate a blog with a contact form that saves entries to the database from people who live in Europe, you must make your site GDPR compliant.

There are a lot of aspects to the GDPR and while an excerpt can not fully explain it at a glance, there are a few themes that stick out to me.

  • Be upfront and concise about what data is stored, sent, and used on the site or form.
  • Give the user a chance to consent without automatically opting them in.
  • Collect the least amount of data possible for legitimate business purposes.
  • Provide a way for users to download or access their data and remove it.

Many of these are common sense practices that are not implemented on many sites, WP Tavern included. How often do you visit a site’s contact form and see an explanation as to why those fields are required, where the data is stored, where it goes, and what is done with it? This is something I’ll be working on in the next few weeks.

Making WordPress Core GDPR Compliant

Earlier this month, a number of volunteers gathered to discuss GDPR compliance in WordPress core. The meeting took place in a newly created channel #gdpr-compliance that’s accessible to anyone with a SlackHQ account.

The team created a proposed roadmap to add privacy tools to core. The plan includes the following ideas:

  • Add notices for registered users and commenters on what data is collected in core by default and explain why.
  • Create guidelines for plugins on how to become GDPR compliant.
  • Create and add tools to facilitate compliance and privacy in general.
  • Add documentation and help for site owners to learn how to use these tools.

Earlier today, the team met and created a GitHub folder that houses the roadmap, knowledge base, trac ticket list, and other items associated with the project. There was also some discussion on whether the interface provided by the GDPR for WordPress project is a good foundation for core and plugins to report personal data. The GDPR Compliance Slack channel is also a good place to ask questions and discuss data privacy in general.

Popular form plugins such as GravityForms and NinjaForms have documentation available that explains GDPR compliance and how it applies to their products. For those who use the Contact Form module in Jetpack which saves entries to the database by default, you’ll need to wait for further updates. WooCommerce and Automattic have announced that they expect their products will be GDPR compliant by the time it goes into effect later this year.

GDPR Resources

If you’re like me, reading about the GDPR and its policies can make your head spin. It’s important to keep in mind that at the heart of the GDPR are common sense behaviors for handling personal data. If you’d like to learn more about the GDPR, check out the following resources.

YG Booster

Drupal Themes - Tue, 02/27/2018 - 14:08

A free bootstrap based Drupal 8 theme with modern design for products and business. This theme is built using paragraph module, so the sections can be added as many time as needed. You can easily rearrange sections as per your needs.

Features

  • Drupal 8 core
  • Bootstrap v3.3.5
  • Multi-level drop down menus
  • Modern design with flat elements
  • Font awesome icons
  • Built with paragraph module

Live Demo Download Demo Site

It is highly recommended to install the demo site and customize it to get the exact look. Here is the link for the documentation to install demo site

Theme designed by Freehtml5.co & developed by Young Globes

IBM API Connect Theme

Drupal Themes - Tue, 02/27/2018 - 14:03

The bootstrap based theme used by the IBM API Connect Developer Portal

Yeti

Drupal Themes - Tue, 02/27/2018 - 02:21

- Coming soon

WPTavern: Matt Cromwell Hosts Matt Mullenweg in Q&A Gutenberg Interview

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 02/26/2018 - 23:32

Matt Cromwell, Head of Support and Community Outreach for GiveWP and an administrator for the Advanced WordPress Facebook group, hosted a question and answer session about Gutenberg with Matt Mullenweg earlier today. The interview concludes the Advanced WordPress Gutenberg interview series that includes, Joost de Valk, Ahmad Awais, and Tammie Lister.

Mullenweg began the session by explaining why there is a concerted effort to improve the editor. “It’s really almost any user test that you watch,” he said. “Both watching people brand new to WordPress and those with years of experience on how they used the editor. It became obvious that we could make something more accessible to new users, but also, a lot more powerful for developers.”

With regards to a release date, Mullenweg confirmed that Gutenberg will ship when it’s ready. Later in the interview, Mullenweg was asked if he could provide a more concrete answer.

“For those who want a concrete date, we will have one or two orders of magnitude more users of Gutenberg in April,” he responded. “That doesn’t mean necessarily a 5.0 release, but it does mean that if you’re planning on aiming for something where a lot of users will be interacting with Gutenberg, aim for April.”

While the project’s name is Gutenberg, some developers have expressed concerns on how the name will be deprecated if at all once it’s merged into core. There are a number of educational resources, products, and tool kits referencing Gutenberg that could be a source of confusion once it’s merged into core and referred to as the editor.

Mullenweg was asked if the Gutenberg name will be deprecated. “We’ll see,” he replied. “I don’t think it’s the most important thing to figure out right now. We’re tackling some much bigger issues. If the plugin is useful, we’ll keep it around for beta testing, if not, we’ll have it turn itself off.”

Mullenweg concluded the interview thanking the Advanced WordPress Facebook group for the passion and discussions shared by members. The group has more than 30K members, is free to join, well maintained, and often filled with interesting topics. You can watch the interview in its entirety below.

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