Wordpress News

WordPress.org blog: The Month in WordPress: September 2019

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 10/02/2019 - 08:05

September has been a particularly busy month in the WordPress community—a lot of important work has been done as everyone in the project works towards an upcoming major release. Read on to find out more about this and everything else that has been going on over the past month.

WordPress 5.2.3 Security and Maintenance Release

Early in September, version 5.2.3 of WordPress was released as a security and maintenance release. Sixty-two individuals contributed to its 29 fixes and enhancements.

The security issues fixed in this release owe thanks to numerous people who disclosed them responsibly. You can read more about the vulnerability reporting process in the Core handbook.

Want to get involved in building WordPress Core? Follow the Core team blog, and join the #core channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

WordPress 5.3 Enters Beta

WhileWordPress 5.3 is slated for release on November 12, it has already entered the beta phase with the second beta release being made available at the end of September. As this is a major release, it will feature a number of new features and enhancements, including significant improvements to the block editor, updates to the Site Health component, new block APIs, accessibility updates, and much more.

You can test the 5.3 beta release by installing the WordPress Beta Tester plugin on any WordPress site, although as this is software that is currently in development, we don’t recommend installing it on a live site.

Want to get involved in building this release? Test the beta, follow the Core team blog, and join the #core channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

Date/Time Component Improvements

For over a year, contributors involved in the Date/Time component of WordPress Core have been working hard on the “wp_date” project. The goal of this project is to fix and streamline the way that Core handles times and dates throughout the platform.

This ambitious project has seen incremental changes over the last few Core releases. The upcoming 5.3 release will include the final and most significant changes to the component, bringing much-needed stability to time handling in WordPress Core.

Want to get involved in the Date/Time component of WordPress Core? Learn more about it, follow the Core team blog, and join the #core-datetime channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

New Theme Review Team Structure

After recent discussions around the goals of the Theme Review team, some changes have been made to the leadership structure of the team. The team leads are now ‘representatives’ of different areas of the work that they do. This flat structure allows for representatives to work in more loosely defined areas so they contribute to the team in more diverse ways, and helps the team to be more focused on setting and achieving their goals. The new structure is outlined in the team handbook.

Want to get involved in reviewing themes for WordPress? Follow the Theme Review team blog, and join the #themereview channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

New Default Theme: Twenty Twenty

The upcoming 5.3 release will also include a new default theme for WordPress, Twenty Twenty. This theme will have a strong focus on readability and accessibility while being optimized for the block editor that first shipped with WordPress 5.0.

Development of Twenty Twenty has been going quickly, with a recent update showing more of the design and layouts that you can expect when the theme is released with WordPress 5.3 in November.

Want to get involved in building Twenty Twenty? You can contribute on GitHub, follow the Core team blog, and join the #core channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

Further Reading:

Have a story that we should include in the next “Month in WordPress” post? Please submit it here.

The Month in WordPress: September 2019

Wordpress News - Wed, 10/02/2019 - 08:05

September has been a particularly busy month in the WordPress community—a lot of important work has been done as everyone in the project works towards an upcoming major release. Read on to find out more about this and everything else that has been going on over the past month.

WordPress 5.2.3 Security and Maintenance Release

Early in September, version 5.2.3 of WordPress was released as a security and maintenance release. Sixty-two individuals contributed to its 29 fixes and enhancements.

The security issues fixed in this release owe thanks to numerous people who disclosed them responsibly. You can read more about the vulnerability reporting process in the Core handbook.

Want to get involved in building WordPress Core? Follow the Core team blog, and join the #core channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

WordPress 5.3 Enters Beta

WhileWordPress 5.3 is slated for release on November 12, it has already entered the beta phase with the second beta release being made available at the end of September. As this is a major release, it will feature a number of new features and enhancements, including significant improvements to the block editor, updates to the Site Health component, new block APIs, accessibility updates, and much more.

You can test the 5.3 beta release by installing the WordPress Beta Tester plugin on any WordPress site, although as this is software that is currently in development, we don’t recommend installing it on a live site.

Want to get involved in building this release? Test the beta, follow the Core team blog, and join the #core channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

Date/Time Component Improvements

For over a year, contributors involved in the Date/Time component of WordPress Core have been working hard on the “wp_date” project. The goal of this project is to fix and streamline the way that Core handles times and dates throughout the platform.

This ambitious project has seen incremental changes over the last few Core releases. The upcoming 5.3 release will include the final and most significant changes to the component, bringing much-needed stability to time handling in WordPress Core.

Want to get involved in the Date/Time component of WordPress Core? Learn more about it, follow the Core team blog, and join the #core-datetime channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

New Theme Review Team Structure

After recent discussions around the goals of the Theme Review team, some changes have been made to the leadership structure of the team. The team leads are now ‘representatives’ of different areas of the work that they do. This flat structure allows for representatives to work in more loosely defined areas so they contribute to the team in more diverse ways, and helps the team to be more focused on setting and achieving their goals. The new structure is outlined in the team handbook.

Want to get involved in reviewing themes for WordPress? Follow the Theme Review team blog, and join the #themereview channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

New Default Theme: Twenty Twenty

The upcoming 5.3 release will also include a new default theme for WordPress, Twenty Twenty. This theme will have a strong focus on readability and accessibility while being optimized for the block editor that first shipped with WordPress 5.0.

Development of Twenty Twenty has been going quickly, with a recent update showing more of the design and layouts that you can expect when the theme is released with WordPress 5.3 in November.

Want to get involved in building Twenty Twenty? You can contribute on GitHub, follow the Core team blog, and join the #core channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

Further Reading:

Have a story that we should include in the next “Month in WordPress” post? Please submit it here.

HeroPress: 14 Years’ Detour

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 10/02/2019 - 05:00

Это эссе также доступно на русском языке

Knowing what you want isn’t enough.

At the age of fifteen, I was told to hurry up with my professional education, if I don’t get a free place at university no one will pay for me. Last one was obvious and not because of money. I didn’t know how high or low my chances are even I had very good marks. I could have been just the biggest fish in the pond, but I wanted to leave people who treat me like expense item as soon as possible anyway. I made up my mind and it’s separated me from my classmates. I got secondary school certificate and left school instantly without goodbyes.

My knowledge of opportunities was very narrow. I thought to be an ecologist or guide translator from German, based on what I was taught at school, or an advertiser, it was ads boom in Russia, ads were fascinating, and I collected flyers. At the same time, I was already good a computer user and did a lot of typing for one of the school’s principals, sometimes instead of classes, volunteered once and they couldn’t say “no”.

No one bothered to give me advice, but I was sure my future was unimaginable without computers and came to a general decision to be a programmer. The range of technical schools was not wide, and names of specializations looked very abstruse. I messed up and spend four years studying transistor markings, soldering and drawing PCB layouts. Programming course turns out to be a bit of a joke, it was Pascal, we didn’t even try to do something useful with it. English course was another flaw in this education, the teacher was busy showing off and teasing girls. I’m not sure if he even knew the subject. He was fired after our collective petition. We got good marks just to forget about it. I left technical school with honors degree and improved typing skills.

It was wild unfriendly market I faced. I didn’t know how to recognize a normal job offer from sinister one, so I bumped into several, like banging in people’s doors and pitch them in buying cheap stuff for very high price. It was harassing and I have no idea how long I would’ve looked for work without help.

The wrong approach can cause failure

I was lucky to have a father in an IT company. He proposed me like a substitute to typists when I was still a student and when I finished, helped me to get a job on updating a law system on client’s computers. Maybe I could get it by coming from the street, but I had to know where the entrance is. Half a year later I got a full-time job in the same service department and started to play volleyball with colleagues. It was great to meet people from other departments and on the field was no big difference between director and analyst, it’s fair play. I liked my place and my clients, but I was “friendly” told that without a university degree I will have no further promotions.

At this time, I tried to study PHP by a book. It was very exciting at first, but a lot of functions without explanation how to build something useful with them didn’t make much sense and when I tried, I failed and backed off. It was hard to admit a fail even to myself and it was nagging me for a long time.

I had to choose something I can handle; I’m interested in and can afford. It turned out to be advertising. I spent most of my and my husband’s holidays on sessions in the next 6 years. It was tricky for him to make me to leave a computer, once I was glued to it, so he bought me my first laptop. English was still hard for me, I got my high marks just memorizing all the words in a textbook and how they must sound. Again, I wanted something I cannot handle.

I started to hate my workplace long before I finished education with another honor degree no one was interested in.

I got a promotion quite soon despite apprehensions but then my chief was dismissed and with new one the things became very tense; I escaped to have a baby and spent a whole three years on child’s care holidays full of doubts. I tried to get off by studying, drawing and baking but the pram was pulling me back. I didn’t use to stay put, rely on my husband’s money and be separate from other people. I didn’t want to come back, but it looked like I have no better choice, I was convinced (overall, rightly) that not too many companies want in office position a woman with small baby and lots of sick leaves.

After I returned at work it became clear that the situation in my department was unhealthier than ever, I lost my place and next boss treated all back-office girls like pieces of furniture. In a few months I had enough.

The flip side of the coin can become a black swan

I wanted to be a marketer. Knowing how tricky it is to sell intangibles, I wanted solid product to work with. Now I see that it isn’t a point at all.

It turned out to be difficult to find a job outside IT, some HRs was kind enough to answer that with my experience I’ll better be in IT.

Still I was very hopeful, studied hard and considered myself well, but once again I set a low bar to my employers. Companies I worked in wanted to get all publicity and sales rise through a cost of my salaries. I was careless once, the next time I asked specifically about budget before signing up and was assured, but still they meant my wages. It was a tough period of disappointments.

When I was offered a part-time administrative job with “ok” to sick leaves, I took it gladly like a reprieve. It was far from home, and I was spending 2-3 hours a day on buses with Harry Potter audio books for company. In these traffic jams I started to feel English at last and loved it, it gave me a freedom no money can buy. And despite the long way I managed to play volleyball with my husband and his colleagues. Life was getting better.

This job itself in addition to low payment had something valuable to me — a working website. After my boss had a row with its developer, I got it to maintain, did some reverse engineering and understood how it works. It wasn’t a most creative site, but it gave me a view. I started to write simple sites from scratch.

My first JavaScript calculator almost made me crazy, but I pursued.

From time to time I was asked for help from a friend or relative, usually to solve some urgent problems. So, I started to meet popular CMSs. One of the first I met with was WordPress. There was some issue in theme, which was changed and dropped by developer. I was digging a whole weekend deciphering how it works and found infinity loop to fix. Back then for me it was just a system…

Two years later I found myself still clinging to my temporary job. I was tired of working for a hard nosed dictator, the last drop was his statement that I was not a programmer, because he hadn’t seen anything I made. I’ve already written some parts of website he asked for, so it was just unfair. I became angry and it was exactly what I needed, a big kick.

I went out but still had no courage to pretend on a developer’s place and landed in some franchise company selling “box version” websites. It was another tough half of a year with a lot of work, low payment and plan failures, ending with pneumonia. I see now that I was making a disservice to customers, websites are not a microwave meal — quick, cheap and dummy. There was no life in them without a lot of work no one bargained to buy or do. Most of the sites I sold back then died when year expired but they never were truly alive and useful.

You need to pluck up your courage to become lucky

When I recovered, I search through developer’s job offers, but it was difficult to find something suitable worth trying to apply. I was reading job advertising and it looked, and still is, like mostly IT company are presented and they want geniuses who know a lot of technologies and frameworks at once. It was very distressing just to look.

And then I became lucky again. I opened a private ads site and almost immediately found a job which was fitted me perfectly — they wanted someone with experience to write from scratch, understand another’s code and maintain it, ability to translate technical documentation and articles and make simple design of printing products. I made test task and there was no need in my resume or diplomas, I was taken. It’s turned out direct ad from one of sales departments in tech company and I passed by HR, who most likely wouldn’t even have considered me. Superior agreed to have me remotely most of the time, it solved sick leaves problem even if it was already much better than before. Addition to better salaries and calm work without over hours, I got very pleasant colleagues. We are friends ever since, despite back then no one guessed to invite me to play volleyball.

It was 14 years after the original decision to be a programmer and it was only the beginning. I left this amazing place a couple years later when it held no more challenges for me.

Conscious decisions require wide knowledge

After I worked with a bunch of CMSs, I started to be able to compare them and understood not only that WordPress is the best one for developers and clients but also that I didn’t see right examples at all. The biggest flaw of WordPress — it’s so easy to make things work that there’s no need to bother and do things right and this becomes a problem later. I also saw bad cases on very different systems… and did them as well.

I used to work relying on examples at hand, documentation and Google, but searching for a specific feature or a solution, I found myself again missing the whole picture. At this point Udemy courses came very handy and then I started to attend WordPress events, firstly online and then by foot, trains and airplanes and discovered a wide and very alive community. Now I know not only where to look but whom to ask and how to be not far from those who stays on top of things as much as possible. Most important is that I found allies who don’t think I’m going crazy, speaking with shining eyes about work, with whom I share a passion and fondness to WordPress. It’s what matters.

Now, after 6 years of full time in development, I still feel myself like a newbie, it’s endless learning, frequent discoveries, mistakes and impassable wish to do better…

The way is the destination

I made a path very uneven, a lot of mess and banging, but for me it’s like a kaleidoscope where a little turn presents a new picture, new “a-ha” moment, new excitement after seemingly pointless efforts. When in doubt I remind myself about David Ogilvy who tried a lot of things before struck gold with advertising and it’s maybe why.

Finally, I learned not only to keep face and move forward but also to dare.

Freedom is to make your own mind

I left my last workplace after we finished exhausted two years project on another CMS system which was a big reinventing of wheels and made up my mind to work only with WordPress from now on and dare to be my own boss.

Now I’m officially an entrepreneur. This big boy’s stuff looks difficult. But I don’t want to be told, collaboration is a new black wherever I look.

Крюк длинной в 14 лет

Не достаточно знать, что хочешь

В 15 лет мне было сказано, чтобы я поспешила с профессиональным образованием, если не поступлю бесплатно в институт, никто платить за меня не будет. Последнее было очевидно и не из-за денег. Несмотря на весьма хорошие оценки, я не могла оценить свои шансы, могло оказаться, что я просто большая рыба в маленьком пруду. Но в любом случае, я хотела как можно быстрей расстаться с людьми, видящими во мне одну большую статью расходов. Я приняла решение и это откололо меня от моих одноклассников. Ушла из школы я, не прощаясь, как только получила на руки сертификат об окончании 9 классов.

Нужно было выбрать профессию, но потенциальные возможности были весьма туманны. Я могла стать экологом или немецкоязычным гид-переводчиком, на основе того, чему училась в школе, или рекламщиком, в России тогда начался рекламный бум, и она казалась очень захватывающей, я даже листовки собирала. В то же самое время я уже была хорошим пользователем компьютера и набирала документы для завуча старших классов, иногда вместо занятий — вызвалась один раз и потом уже не могла сказать «нет».

Никто не пытался дать мне совет, но я была уверена, что будущее немыслимо без компьютеров и решила стать программистом. Выбор техникумов в пределах разумной досягаемости, был не очень большой, а названия специальностей выглядели очень мудрено. Я ошиблась и провела следующие 4 года изучая маркировку транзисторов, паяя и чертя печатные платы. Курс программирования обернулся дурной шуткой, это был Паскаль, и мы даже не пытались сделать с ним что-то полезное. Другим серьезным недостатком этого обучения стал английский язык, преподаватель выпендривался и задирал девушек, я так и не поняла знал ли он язык вообще. В конце концов он был уволен после нашей коллективной жалобы, а мы получили хорошие оценки, в качестве решения проблемы. Я выпустилась из техникума с красным дипломом и улучшенными навыками машинистки.

Рынок труда был диким и неизведанным. Не зная, как распознать сомнительное предложение о работе, наткнулась на несколько таких, как ходить по домам и навязывать людям дешевые утюги за внушительную цену. Поиск работы оказался изматывающим, без посторонней помощи, я могла бы еще долго ходить по этим собеседованиям.

Неправильный подход может быть причиной неудачи

Мне повезло, отец работал в IT-компании. Он предложил меня в качестве подмены наборщикам, когда я еще училась, а когда закончила, помог получить работу по обновлению правовой системы на компьютерах у клиентов. Может быть меня взяли бы и, приди я с улицы, но для этого нужно было знать, куда идти. Через полгода я получила место в офисе в том же отделе обслуживания, а также начала играть с коллегами в волейбол. Это было здорово, знакомиться с людьми из других отделов, а еще на поле нет большой разницы между директором и аналитиком. Мне нравилось мое место и мои клиенты, но опять мне было «дружески» сказано, что без высшего образования, на большее я могу не рассчитывать.

В это время я пыталась изучать PHP по книге. В начале все выглядело очень захватывающе, но функции без понимания как из них построить что-то целое не имели большого смысла, я пробовала, у меня не получалось, и в конце концов сдалась. Было сложно признаться, что я не смогла, даже самой себе и это неприятное чувство преследовало меня долгое время.

Нужно было выбрать то, с чем я смогу справиться, что-то интересное и что будет мне по карману. Выбор пал на рекламу. В следующие 6 лет большая часть наших с мужем отпусков ушла на мои сессии. Ему было сложно выгнать меня из-за компьютера, я к нему приклеилась, поэтому он купил мне мой первый ноутбук. Английский по-прежнему давался мне очень трудно, и чтобы получить пять, пришлось переводить и запоминать вместе с транскрипцией все слова в учебном пособии. Снова я хотела то, что мне не давалось.

Я начала ненавидеть свое рабочее место задолго до того, как закончила университет с еще одним никому не нужным красным дипломом.

Я получила повышение достаточно скоро, несмотря на опасения, но затем руководство сменилось и работать с новым стало весьма напряженно. Я сбежала в декрет и провела следующие три года отпуска по уходу за ребенком полные сомнений. Учеба, рисование и приготовление пирогов отвлекали, но я оказалась не готова быть привязанной к коляске — ограниченной в передвижениях, оторванной от других людей, полагаться на деньги мужа. Возвращаться на работу я не хотела, но не видела лучшего выхода, была убеждена, и вполне резонно, что ни так много компаний готовы взять на офисную позицию женщину с маленьким ребенком и кучей больничных.

После того, как я вернулась на работу, стало ясно, что ситуация стала еще хуже, чем была. Я потеряла свое место, а очередной новый руководитель относился во всем девушкам «поддержки» как к мебели. Несколько месяцев мне хватило.

Обратная сторона медали может быть золотой

Я хотела быть маркетологом. Зная, как непросто продавать что-то неосязаемое, решила работать с товаром, который можно пощупать. Сейчас думаю, разница была только в голове.

Оказалось, сложно найти работу вне IT-сектора, некоторые менеджеры по персоналу снисходили для объяснений, что мне будет лучше в IT.

И все-таки я была настроена оптимистично, я усердно училась и считала, что хорошо справляюсь, но опять, оказалось, что установила слишком низкую планку для работодателей. Компании, в которых я работала, хотели и публикации, и рост продаж исключительно за счет моей зарплаты. Ошибившись один раз, в следующий я специально уточнила вопрос с бюджетом, и меня заверили, что он есть. Оказалось, что это по-прежнему только зарплата. Это был период разочарований.

Когда мне предложили административную работу на полставки с терпимым отношением к больничным, я с радостью ухватилась за возможность взять передышку. Работа была далеко от дома, и я проводила 2-3 часа в маршрутках каждый день в компании с аудиокнигами про Гарри Поттера. В этих дорожных пробках я наконец почувствовала английский язык и полюбила его, это дало мне свободу, которую невозможно купить за деньги. И, несмотря на долгую дорогу, я смогла играть после работы в волейбол с мужем и его коллегами. Жизнь налаживалась.

Эта работа сама по себе, помимо низкой зарплаты, имела нечто ценное для меня – работающий сайт. После того, как мой начальник поссорился с разработчиком, я получила его на поддержку. Разобрав его на части, я поняла, как он работает. Это не был самый креативный сайт в мире, но он дал мне целостное представление, и я начала писать простые сайты с нуля.

Мой первый калькулятор на JavaScript практически свел меня с ума, но я продолжила.

Время от времени меня просили помочь родственники и друзья, обычно решить какую-то срочную проблему. Так я стала встречаться с популярными CMS. Одной из первых оказался WordPress. Там была проблема в теме, которую разработчик изменил и бросил. Я копала все выходные, но в конце концов нашла место, где код уходил в бесконечный цикл и исправила. Тогда для меня это была просто какая-то система…

Два года спустя я все еще держалась за свою временную работу. Резкие манеры начальника перестали казаться забавными и последней каплей стало его категорическое заявление, что я не программист, потому что он не видел ничего, созданного мной. На тот момент я уже написала для сайта функционал, который он же просил, так что это было обидно. Я разозлилась и это стало толчком в нужном направлении.

Я ушла, но все еще не пыталась получить работу разработчика, и в результате оказалась в одной из франшизных компаний, продающих сайты «из коробки». Это были сложные полгода с кучей работы, низкой зарплатой и провалами плана, закончившиеся воспалением легких. Сейчас, думаю, я оказывала клиентам медвежью услугу, сайт – не готовое блюдо для микроволновки, быстрое, дешевое и типовое. В этих сайтах нет жизни без вложения огромного труда, за которых никто не готов был платить. Большая часть сайтов умерли через год, но они и живыми то не были.

Нужно набраться смелости, чтобы повезло

Когда я поправилась, начала искать работу разработчика, но было сложно найти что-то подходящее даже просто чтобы решиться ответить на вакансию. В объявлениях были в основном представлены IT-компании, которым нужны гении, знающие огромное количество технологий и фреймворков. Только вид этих вакансий вгонял в депрессию.

А потом мне снова повезло. Я открыла сайт частных объявлений и буквально сразу же нашла работу, которая мне подходила идеально — они хотели кого-то с опытом написания с нуля, умеющего разбираться и дописывать чужой код, переводить техническую документацию и статьи, а также делать простую полиграфию. Я сделала тестовое задание и была принята, ни дипломы, ни резюме уже не понадобились. Оказалось, это был объявление одного из отделов продаж в компании, занимающейся промышленным оборудованием, и я прошла в обход отделка кадров, который, уверена, даже не посмотрел бы на меня. Начальник согласился на мою работу удаленно, что решило проблему частых больничных, хотя ребенок рос, и их уже стало намного меньше. В дополнение к лучшей зарплате и спокойной работе без переработок и нервотрепки, мне достались замечательные коллеги. Мы дружим с тех пор, несмотря на то, что тогда никто не догадался позвать меня играть в волейбол.

Это случилось через 14 лет после первоначального решения стать программистом и это был только начало. Я ушла через пару лет, когда ничего нового в работе уже не осталось.

Сознательные решения требуют широкий знаний

После того, как я поработала с разными CMS, смогла не только сравнить их между собой и понять, что WordPress лучшая из всех как для разработчиков, так и для клиентов, но также обнаружить, что вообще не видела хороших примеров разработки. Самая большая проблема WordPress — сделать так, чтобы работало, настолько легко, что мало кто не утруждает себя делать правильно, что позже оборачивается проблемами при доработке и поддержке. Впрочем, я видела плохие решения на разных CMS, да и сама их делала.

Отталкиваясь от доступных примеров и документации и ища в поисковиках конкретные решения, я опять обнаружила, что не вижу всей картины. В этот момент курсы Udemy оказались очень кстати, а затем я начала посещать мероприятия WordPress, сначала онлайн, потом топая ни них ножками, оправляясь на поездах и самолетах, и обнаружила большое и весьма активное сообщество. Наконец-то я нашла не только тех, у кого можно спросить, но и как быть недалеко от тех, кто «в теме», насколько это вообще возможно. Самое важное – я нашла единомышленников, тех, кто не думает, что человек, говорящий с горящими глазами о работе, рехнулся, с кем у нас общая страсть и любовь к WordPress. Это то, что имеет значение.

Сейчас, проработав 6 лет как разработчик, я все еще чувствую себя новичком, это бесконечное обучение, частые открытия, ошибки и непроходящее желание сделать лучше.

Смысл пути в самом пути

Мой путь очень извилистый, много метаний и набитых шишек, но для меня это как калейдоскоп, где каждый поворот показывает новую картинку, новое озарение, дает энергию двигаться дальше после казавшихся напрасными усилий. В периоды сомнений, я напоминаю себе о Дэвиде Огилви, который сменил множество специальностей, пока не добился успеха в рекламе.

Я научилась не только сохранять лицо и идти вперед, но также набралась смелости.

Свобода — возможность принимать решения

Я ушла со своего последнего места работы, где мы закончили изматывающий двухлетний проект на другой CMS, ставший сам по себе большой ошибкой, и ни только приняла решение работать исключительно с WordPress, но и стать своим собственным начальником.

Теперь я официально предприниматель. Все эти вещи «для больших мальчиков» выглядят достаточно сложными, но я больше не хочу слепо делать то, что мне скажут. В тренде коллаборации, куда ни глянь.

The post 14 Years’ Detour appeared first on HeroPress.

WPTavern: Brian Gardner Steps Down From StudioPress

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 10/01/2019 - 19:37

Brian Gardner announced he was stepping down from his role with StudioPress this past Friday. Last year, WP Engine acquired StudioPress. After staying on board for the remainder of his contract, Gardner stepped down from his role with the company.

“The past 15 months have gone by quickly, and it sometimes feels like yesterday that we made the announcement,” Gardner said in his post. “In the same breath, it has also felt like forever.”

For many in the WordPress community, Gardner needs no introduction. He’s the founder of StudioPress and co-created Genesis with Nathan Rice, one of the most popular WordPress themes today. In many ways, he’s the father of the modern professional WordPress theme ecosystem, becoming one of the first theme authors to figure out that you could make a living by providing WordPress products.

He’s unafraid of letting his personal geek flag fly in his online life. He quotes Sarah McLachlan, is a self-affirmed Starbucks addict, runs marathons, and loves family trips to Disney World.

For many theme authors in the WordPress community, he’s an inspiration. Even as a former business competitor, I’ve always admired his work. More than that, I’ve admired how he runs his business. He never needed to be flashy. He never needed to create controversy for PR. He, almost quietly, built up a successful company. The splashes he made came from the products he and his company released.

In 2007, Gardner released the Revolution WordPress theme to the public for sale. Some may argue that Revolution was the catalyst for the commercial WordPress themes ecosystem. There were several theme business startups around the same time. Revolution at least played a pivotal role in the market’s early growth.

Gardner launched the Revolution business in 2008, but quickly rebranded to StudioPress in 2009 after some legal issues with the name. By late 2010, StudioPress merged with Copyblogger.

Hindsight: The Biggest Regrets After 12 Years

When building a successful company, it’s easy to look back on things that could’ve been handled differently. There are deals passed up, ideas that flopped, and products that didn’t scale.

“My biggest regret was not starting with (or switching to) a recurring business model,” said Gardner. “I think I left a lot of money on the table by not doing that, but once I merged StudioPress into Copyblogger Media, we decided to leave it as is and use the former as a doorway into our company’s ecosystem.”

Many theme companies in the early days had lifetime sales. It’s unlikely many could foretell how they’d need to scale for 10 or 20 years down the line. The concept was relatively new in the WordPress space. Gardner kept up with the model despite most theme shops moving to subscription-based sales, which typically scale better in the long term.

From a personal standpoint, I think I could have done better. There were a few seasons (some short and others a bit longer) where I strayed away from my involvement at StudioPress. While I justified it by thinking that it was OK to pursue side projects and other things, I realize looking back that jeopardized the trust our customers had in the brand. I think I may have leaned too heavily on the fact that we had a team, but in the same breath, I think it was necessary for StudioPress to outgrow the label of ‘Brian Gardner themes.’ This emphasis really helped with the transition after WP Engine acquired StudioPress.

Building a Community Over Software

“Without a doubt, it’s the Genesis community,” Gardner said when asked what he’s most proud of with his time at StudioPress. “When Nathan Rice and I set out to build Genesis (the framework), we were trying to solve a software problem and bring a better user experience for our customers.”

Instead of building software, he learned what he was building was a community. After creating a showcase page for people using the Genesis theme, he kept getting requests for people to build child themes. This led to the creation of the Genesis Developers page, which provided a way for people within the community to earn a living.

“While community has always been important to me,” Gardner said, “I didn’t realize the ripple effect that creating a solid piece of software would have.”

Gardner said the developers page created a way to pay it forward to the people who had helped him build a successful company. The idea has remained a success, and there are many designers within the larger WordPress community who list custom Genesis design work in their credentials.

“I have had the pleasure of being able to meet and spend time with members of the community—from talking about their success to future plans,” said Gardner. “This past year at WordCamp US in Nashville, I was able to fully comprehend the level in which lives had been changed by what we had done—and those are the moments I could not be any prouder of what I built.”

What’s on the Horizon?

“Heh. The million-dollar question, right?” responded Gardner to whether he plans to continue building themes. He doesn’t have any plans to create a new theme business, and any themes that he does build will be built for Genesis and made available from his website.

“Over the past few years, I have developed a particular love for minimalist design, and I want to spend some of my time and creative energy there.”

Gardner is currently available for hire as a website designer through Authentik, a design and development studio that he founded. Authentik specializes in branding and growth/audience building. The team builds everything from landing pages to more complex multi-system environments.

However, there may be more to come from Gardner in the future. “I have created some personal space to pursue collaborations and consulting,” he said. “I have a renewed focus on my blog and want to spend more time consuming content—reading books, listening to podcasts, and meeting up with folks locally. My heart to help fellow creators is as strong as ever, and I feel there are some really interesting opportunities to do that.”

Restaurant DS

Drupal Themes - Tue, 10/01/2019 - 16:36

Restaunt DS is a responsive Drupal 8 theme for Hotel & restaurant related websites.

Features

  • Drupal 8.7 core
  • Multiple Pages
  • Booking Reservation Page

Live Demo


Download Demo Site

Downloaded Demo login credentials : admin / admin@ds


Credits

Designed by Melody Themes

Drupal theme by DrupalSlave

WPTavern: Automattic Has Discontinued Active Development on Edit Flow Plugin

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 10/01/2019 - 03:31

Edit Flow, the modular editorial plugin that enables collaboration inside the WordPress admin, is no longer being actively developed. After no updates for nine months, Mark Warbinek, a frustrated user, contacted Automattic to ask if they have abandoned the plugin or still plan to update it. A support representative from Automattic confirmed the company will no longer be updating Edit Flow:

At this time there is no active development of the Edit Flow Plugin.

That being the case – two things I can suggest are:

Submitting the issue to the Github repository for the plugin. This is used to track future development of the plugin and will be a canonical place for bugs or issues to be recorded.
https://github.com/Automattic/Edit-Flow

It is possible to ‘fork’ the plugin and make the changes needed – or use an alternative that has already been forked like PublishPress:
https://github.com/Automattic/Edit-Flow

Edit Flow is active on more than 10,000 WordPress sites and its sporadic development has caused users to question whether it was abandoned several times over the years. It is still listed among the WordPress.com VIP plugins, but will likely only be maintained for that platform going forward. A 10-month old PR was merged on its GitHub repository as recently as 19 days ago, after the contributor began to question whether the project was abandoned.

In 2016, Edit Flow went two years in between updates, leaving frustrated users in the dark. After that incident, a representative from Automattic said the company was working on an internal effort to improve the maintenance of their own plugins in order to avoid a situation like this happening again. The company currently has 88 plugins listed in the official directory.

PublishPress is the only alternative editorial plugin with comparable features, including an editorial calendar, notifications, editorial comments, custom statuses, and a content overview. It also offers seamless migration of Edit Flow data to PublishPress. A commercial version of the plugin includes additional features, such as a publishing checklist, reminders, permissions, a WooCommerce checklist, and more.

“I think I can speak for those users of this plugin that we are not happy with the horrible handling of this plugin, how Automattic has ignored and abandoned it, leaving users to suffer in the continuing fails this out-of-date plugin is causing,” Mark Warbinek said in response to to the reply from Automattic’s support team.

Unfortunately, this is always a risk when using free plugins from WordPress.org, especially ones without a direct business model supporting development. In many instances the plugin author’s first priority will be maintaining it for the paying customers. In this case that is WordPress.com VIP clients. Automattic has not posted an announcement on Edit Flow’s support forums, but an official communication would go a long way towards steering users in the right direction when they inevitably come looking for signs of life in the plugin.

WordPress.org blog: WordPress 5.3 Beta 2

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 09/30/2019 - 21:43

WordPress 5.3 Beta 2 is now available!

This software is still in development, so we don’t recommend running it on a production site. Consider setting up a test site to play with the new version.

You can test the WordPress 5.3 beta in two ways:

WordPress 5.3 is slated for release on November 12, 2019, and we need your help to get there.

Thanks to the testing and feedback from everyone who tested beta 1, over 45 tickets have been closed since then.

Some highlights
  • Work continues on the block editor.
  • Bugs fixed on Twenty Twenty.
  • Accessibility bugs fixes and enhancements on the interface changes introduced with 5.3 beta 1:
    • Iterate on the admin interface
    • Reduce potential backward compatibility issues
    • Improve consistency between admin screens and the block editor
    • Better text zoom management
  • Support rel="ugc" attribute value in comments (#48022) – this particular ticket shows the WordPress project ability to integrate quick solutions to things that are changing unexpectedly – like Google new features.
Developer notes

WordPress 5.3 has lots of refinements to polish the developer experience. To keep up, subscribe to the Make WordPress Core blog and pay special attention to the developers notes for updates on those and other changes that could affect your products.

How to Help

Do you speak a language other than English? Help us translate WordPress into more than 100 languages!

If you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. We’d love to hear from you! If you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, file one on WordPress Trac where you can also find a list of known bugs.

WordPress 5.3 Beta 2

Wordpress News - Mon, 09/30/2019 - 21:43

WordPress 5.3 Beta 2 is now available!

This software is still in development, so we don’t recommend running it on a production site. Consider setting up a test site to play with the new version.

You can test the WordPress 5.3 beta in two ways:

WordPress 5.3 is slated for release on November 12, 2019, and we need your help to get there.

Thanks to the testing and feedback from everyone who tested beta 1, over 45 tickets have been closed since then.

Some highlights
  • Work continues on the block editor.
  • Bugs fixed on Twenty Twenty.
  • Accessibility bugs fixes and enhancements on the interface changes introduced with 5.3 beta 1:
    • Iterate on the admin interface
    • Reduce potential backward compatibility issues
    • Improve consistency between admin screens and the block editor
    • Better text zoom management
  • Support rel="ugc" attribute value in comments (#48022) – this particular ticket shows the WordPress project ability to integrate quick solutions to things that are changing unexpectedly – like Google new features.
Developer notes

WordPress 5.3 has lots of refinements to polish the developer experience. To keep up, subscribe to the Make WordPress Core blog and pay special attention to the developers notes for updates on those and other changes that could affect your products.

How to Help

Do you speak a language other than English? Help us translate WordPress into more than 100 languages!

If you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. We’d love to hear from you! If you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, file one on WordPress Trac where you can also find a list of known bugs.

WPTavern: Preparing Themes For WordPress 5.3

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 09/30/2019 - 16:45

Now that WordPress 5.3 Beta 1 is open for testing and with the official release slated for November 12, it’s time for theme authors to begin making sure their themes are ready for several changes.

Most work will revolve around the block editor. WordPress 5.3 will include versions 5.4 – 6.5 of the Gutenberg plugin, a total of 12 releases. This makes for a lot of ground to cover. The next release includes breaking changes.

For themes without custom block styles, little should change. However, theme authors who have been building custom block designs will likely have some work to do if they haven’t kept up with the changes in the Gutenberg plugin over the past several months.

Block Style Variations API Introduced

WordPress 5.3 introduces new server-side block style functions. This means that theme authors who prefer PHP can now register custom block style variations without writing JavaScript code.

The block styles feature allows theme authors to register custom styles for individual blocks. Then, they must apply custom CSS to these styles in the editor and the front end.

The new functions are basic one-to-one matches to their JavaScript counterparts. Block styles still need to be registered on a per-block basis. Support for registering single styles to multiple blocks at once hasn’t landed in core.

New Block HTML Creates Breaking Changes

Despite WordPress’ commitment to backward compatibility over the years, the Gutenberg team hasn’t maintained that approach with blocks. Block HTML output in the editor and the front end has changed for some blocks. These changes will break custom theme styles in many cases.

The following blocks have potential breaking changes for themes:

  • Group: A new inner container element was added to the markup.
  • Table: A wrapper element was added and the block class moved to the wrapper.
  • Gallery: Like the table block, it received the same wrapper element treatment. Galleries also support a caption for the entire gallery block.

In my tests, the gallery block had the most obvious breaking changes. Depending on how it is styled, users could be looking at a single column of images instead of their selected number. The core development blog has a complete overview of the HTML changes along with code examples for addressing issues.

It’d be interesting to see if the Gutenberg team makes similar HTML changes with other blocks in the future. Such changes make it tough for theme authors to maintain support between versions of WordPress and versions of the Gutenberg plugin. It also bloats CSS code when attempting to maintain compatibility. Adding an extra element doesn’t typically break things. However, moving an element’s class to another element is a dumpster fire waiting to happen. If these types of changes continue to happen, it could turn some theme authors away from supporting the block editor at a time when core needs to be encouraging more authors to design around it.

New Block Classes Added

Several new CSS classes are making their way into 5.3. For themes that remove core block styles on the front end, they need to add support for the classes to their theme’s stylesheet.

WordPress is doing away with inline styles for left, right, and center text alignment. This is a welcome change because it moves CSS to its appropriate place, which is in a stylesheet. Theme authors need to make sure they support these new classes for the following blocks.

  • Heading
  • Paragraph
  • Quote
  • Verse

The columns block no longer supports column-specific class names. Version 5.3 supports custom column widths, which are handled with inline styles. It’s unlikely this will break most themes, but it’s worth testing.

The separator block now supports custom colors. It is given both the text and background color class names on the front end. This allows theme authors to utilize the styling method they prefer. Ideally, a border color class would exist, but the block editor does not yet support selecting a custom border color.

Quick developer tip: if your theme uses a border color for the separator block, use currentColor to handle custom colors.

Profile Zymphonies Theme

Drupal Themes - Mon, 09/30/2019 - 07:04

Profile Zymphonies Theme is the perfect website solution for developers, speakers, coaches, personal trainers, and other professionals who required to showcase their skills. Display your personal details on your website in the most professional way to attract recruiters and other audience. Read more

Live Demo Advanced Themes

Features
  • Drupal 8 core
  • Bootstrap v4
  • Mobile-first theme
  • Social media links
  • Designed using Sass & Compass
  • Custom slider - Unlimited image upload
  • Personal info
    • About
    • Location
    • Technologies used
    • Companies worked
Most installed Zymphonies theme Contact Zymphonies

Have Queries? Click here to contact Zymphonies

  • Free theme customization & additional features
  • Drupal custom theme development
  • Drupal website design & development
  • Drupal website migration

Sponsored by Zymphonies

Stack DD

Drupal Themes - Sun, 09/29/2019 - 06:02

Stack DD is a responsive Drupal 8 theme.

Features

  • Drupal 8.7 core
  • Single Page
  • Static side Menu bar

Live Demo

Download Demo Site

It is highly recommended to install the demo site and customize it to get the exact look.

Downloaded Demo login credentials : admin / admin@ds


Credits

Designed by Templatemo

Drupal theme by DrupalSlave

Flash

Drupal Themes - Sat, 09/28/2019 - 16:25

Flash is a "Starting Theme" which is optimized for Thunder Publishing Distribution.
It is based on Bootstrap Theme and simplify some things to use it directly or to create simple sub templates.

WPTavern: Secure the News Project Finds 93% of Major Publishers Offer HTTPS Encryption by Default

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 09/27/2019 - 23:58

Secure the News is a project that was created by the Freedom of the Press Foundation in 2016 to track HTTPS encryption across major news organizations’ websites. It lists the publications and automatically scores them on a scale of 0-100, based on HTTPS implementation according to best practices, as defined by General Services Administration (GSA) Pulse’s current criteria for modern and secure HTTPS deployment. The score is converted to an A-F letter grade.

The primary benefits of news organizations adopting HTTPS include reader privacy and website security, but there are also other positive byproducts, such as protecting sources and preventing censorship. Secure the News provides some interesting data in its campaign to encourage more broad HTTPS adoption.

In 2018, after one year of collecting data on HTTPS encryption at more than 130 major world news sites, the project found that HTTPS was available on 2/3 of the sites it monitors (89 of 131), up from 1/3 in 2016. Approximately 60% of news organizations offered HTTPS encryption by default in 2018 and that number is up to 93% today.

Most of the WordPress-powered major news sites, such as Ars Technica, Time and the New York Post, get a B ranking, with the exception of TechCrunch and Quartz, which both scored an A.

The most recent addition to the project is the ability to sort publications by region on the homepage. Publications based in North America and Europe lead the world in having the most secure HTTPS implementations. Asia has a smaller percentage of major news sites with a score of A- or higher. Some smaller regions, such as the Middle East and North Africa, Oceana, and South America, list just a handful of news organizations but they all have a score of B or higher. Secure the News is just getting started with this feature and is accepting feedback on the project’s GitHub account.

In addition to promoting HTTPS adoption, the team behind Secure the News is also considering broadening its coverage to measure other ways that news sites are delivering secure content, such as whether the site has an onion service, is Tor project friendly, or has a confidential tip line. The project also has more news sites to add and a long list of improvements they want to make to the metrics used to rank sites.

The code for Secure the News is open source (licensed under the GNU AGPL) and available on GitHub for anyone who wants to contribute or fork it for use with other site categories where browsing might be sensitive, such as libraries, adult sites, educational institutes, or medical facilities.

WPTavern: Rebirth of Creativity: Gutenberg and the Future of WordPress Themes

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 09/27/2019 - 18:56

I began using WordPress in 2005. I’d already been learning HTML and CSS for a couple of years. I even had a home-brewed blog that pulled posts from plain text files at one point. I knew enough JavaScript to do pop-up alerts and other annoying things that served no purpose and made for a poor user experience, even if they were fun for me.

This was my second attempt at using WordPress. This time it was after a botched go of making PHP Nuke behave how I wanted. I had big dreams for my website but lacked the coding skills to make them happen. WordPress was simple enough to hack for a novice like me at the time. Sure, I broke my site more times than I could count, but I managed to put together my first real theme.

I popped open Photoshop; grabbed a few images from Angel, my favorite TV show at the time; and began my work. I’d recently watched Soul Purpose, an episode that explored whether the titular character was truly the hero mentioned in an ancient prophecy. It was foretold that the vampire with a soul would shed his demon half and live as a human. It explored themes of the character’s place in the world. At 21 years old, it’s the sort of episode that resonated with a young man who was also looking for his place. I thought it fitting to work that into my theme’s design and began hacking away at a header for my theme.

Screenshot of my first WordPress theme header.

At that time, there was this loosely-connected underground of themers and hobbyists who were building WordPress themes based on their favorite TV series, movies, comic books, and more. That was my first real introduction to WordPress. These people were not building themes for profit. They were searching for their place in this small corner of the internet. At most, some were looking for validation from like-minded people who might enjoy their art. It was about creation for the sake of creation. Anyone could be an artist with a simple lesson in CSS, an image manipulation program, and enough grit to pour their soul into the project for a few hours.

If there were ever a time that WordPress themes died, it was when the hobbyists who built for pure passion were overshadowed by business interests.

Don’t get me wrong; business interests played a crucial role in propelling WordPress to become the most dominant CMS in the world. However, the balance has clearly shifted in favor of building WordPress themes for business and ecommerce rather than for the enthusiasts who just want to create. Other platforms have better catered to these users and filled in the gaps left open by WordPress. Tumblr became a safe-haven for popular culture fans. DeviantArt a home for artists. Wattpad for aspiring writers and fanfic lovers.

Somewhere along the way, we lost the innocence and artistry of building WordPress themes for the pure fun of it. WordPress grew up and WordPress themes along with it.

Today’s Themes Are Not Tomorrow’s

In his post, The End of WordPress Themes is in Sight, Ben Gillbanks said, “Themes as we know them will no longer be made.” It is a bleak look at the future of WordPress theming. He notes that he doesn’t believe that he’ll be able to make a living building WordPress themes in the next couple of years.

His worries are warranted. They have been shared by several theme authors over the past couple of years as the block editor (Gutenberg) was making its way into core WordPress. The official theme review team has discussed the team’s future role surrounding the coming changes.

Gillbanks’ post comes on the heels of a post written by Matias Ventura on defining content block areas. Essentially, the idea is for WordPress to allow users to edit areas outside of the post content via the block editor. Anything from the header, footer, sidebar, or otherwise would likely be fair game.

In such a system, themes would be relegated to defining block areas, providing base styles, and designing block output. In many ways, this is what WordPress themes should be. Some might say that WordPress is putting themes back into their proper place of simply styling content. With the behemoth themes with hundreds or thousands of features we’ve seen over the past few years, this could be a welcome change.

There’s huge potential for designers to step up and make their mark. I, for one, wouldn’t mind seeing CSS artists unleashed in the WordPress theme ecosystem.

Gillbanks went on to say:

There are definite benefits to doing this from a user’s perspective – they will have full control of their site – but it’s going to result in some very boring website layouts.

This is the point where I’ll respectfully disagree. Putting control in the hands of non-designers will be anything but boring.

Do we all so easily forget the days of GeoCities? The websites built from it may have been horribly inaccessible. They may have blared midi files as soon as you opened a webpage. They may have even had a flashing, scrolling marquee zipping across the header. Boring is not the word I’d use to describe them.

As much as many of us want to put those days behind us (Come on, you had one of those sites at one point, right? Tell the truth.), there was something fascinating about it all. Real people built these sites because they were fun. The sites told you something about that person. It was a deeply personal look into this stranger’s world. Sometimes it was just a bunch of junk spewed onto the screen, but most sites were a reflection of the site owners at that point in time.

It was ugly and beautiful all the same.

Web developers and designers joke about those dark days of the web. It’s easy to look back at sites from the ’90s and cringe at the silliness (It makes you wonder what designers of 2050 will think about today’s designs, doesn’t it?). I choose to look fondly upon those days. It was a time before I became a “designer” with rules to follow.

But, here’s the important point. We are not the arbiters of the web. It’s all about the user. If someone wants a blinking Justin Bieber GIF in their site header, more power to them. It’s the developer’s job to enable the user to do this in an easy-to-configure way.

Wait? So Geocities is your argument for full-site editing in WordPress?

Understanding why WordPress should become a full-site editor means understanding the average user. Developers are more apt to view things in a structured manner. I spent over a decade honing my development skills. Logic and order are old friends.

With end-users, things may seem a bit more chaotic. A teenager might want to plaster a picture of her favorite band anywhere she wants on her site. A soccer mom might want to show her kid slamming home the winning goal. A poet may want to showcase one of his poems as a background image on his blog. Humans are creative beings. While our unique brand of artistry might not appeal to others, it’s still something we crave to share.

It’s also important to understand that building WordPress themes is nowhere near as simple in 2019 as it was in 2005 when I started hacking away. The code is much more complex. It’s not quite as easy for a new user to piece together something fun as it once was. Unless you have a theme or plugin that allows you to do this with simple drag-and-drop or similar tools, users have little control over their own sites. And, that’s why the Gutenberg project is so revolutionary. Its mission is to put the power back in the hands of the people.

Theme authors need to evolve. They will need to find a way to balance good design principles with the insane amount of freedom users will have. There’s nothing stopping designers from making sure the Bieber screengrab looks more presentable.

Are WordPress Themes Dead?

No. But, the theme landscape will certainly change and not for the first time. We need not look at that as a bad thing.

Those hobbyists who like to tinker with their site, they will once again have power that was so long ago lost to more advanced code.

There will also be sub-communities within the WordPress landscape. Some people will want something more akin to classic WordPress. Others will want a simple blog handled with Markdown (side note: I’m one of those people, and Gutenberg actually handles pasting from Markdown well). Plugins will be built to cater to every user’s needs. Themes will exist for different types of users. Client builds and enterprise solutions that look nothing like core WordPress aren’t going anywhere.

There’s still a long road ahead. Theme authors need to be more involved with the development of Gutenberg as these features make their way into the plugin and eventually into WordPress. Otherwise, they’ll risk losing the opportunity to help shape the future theme landscape.

Truth be told, I’m not sure what themes will look like in a few years. I have a horrible track record with predictions. However, I think it’s safe to say that there’ll be a place for designers.

I’m excited because I feel like it will bring back the potential for users to have the control they once had and more.

WPTavern: Rich Reviews Plugin Discontinued after Vulnerabilities Exploited in the Wild

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 09/27/2019 - 18:25

After tracking exploits of a zero day XSS vulnerability in the Rich Reviews plugin for WordPress, Wordfence is recommending that users remove it from their websites. The company estimates that there are 16,000 active installations vulnerable to unauthenticated plugin option updates:

Attackers are currently abusing this exploit chain to inject malvertising code into target websites. The malvertising code creates redirects and popup ads. Our team has been tracking this attack campaign since April of this year.

Rich Reviews was removed from the WordPress.org Plugin Directory on March 11, 2019, due to a security issue.

One week ago, a Rich Reviews plugin user reported 3 out of 4 of her sites using the plugin were infected with redirect scripts and that removing the plugin fixed the issue. A digital marketing agency called Nuanced Media, the author of the plugin, responded to the post indicating that a new version would be released within two weeks:

We’ve been working on an overall rewrite of this plugin for a while now, but someone out there apparently wanted us to work faster on it, and decided to exploit our plugin to get some malware out there. We’re now going double-quick on it, and hope to have it back up (and newly cozy and secure) within the next two weeks.

Oddly, there seemed to be no rush to patch the issue that is currently being exploited. Yesterday, less than a week after assuring users that a new version is coming, the company behind the plugin announced that it is discontinuing active support and development on Rich Reviews.

Nuanced Media CEO Ryan Flannagan cited Google’s recent changes to its business review guidelines as the reason for discontinuing its development.

“As part of this update, in the organic search results, Google has decided to remove all merchant review star ratings that businesses display on their own URL,” Flannagan said.

“Based on this information, we have discontinued all active development and support on Rich Reviews. We apologize for any inconvenience.”

The announcement does not include any information about the vulnerability or the recent exploits. Users should assume that no patch is coming to the plugin, since it has been officially discontinued. It’s already not available to potential new users on WordPress.org, but those who have Rich Reviews active on their sites should deactivate it and remove the plugin as soon as possible to avoid getting hacked.

Gin

Drupal Themes - Fri, 09/27/2019 - 12:47

A better Content Editor Experience on top of Claro.

This project is is no attempt to fork Claro in any way. It just serves as an extension on what we currently work on at Unic. Some UX changes which are currently out of scope for Claro and/or some customisations we always deliver for our clients. Basically making our changes publicly available for everyone.

Currently work in progress. More to follow.

govstrap

Drupal Themes - Fri, 09/27/2019 - 00:12

a GovCMS light weight bootstrap base theme

WPTavern: Gatsby Raises $15M, Plans to Invest More Heavily in WordPress and CMS Integrations

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 09/26/2019 - 22:35

Gatsby Inc. CEO Kyle Mathews announced a $15M Series A funding round today, just one year after creating the company with GatsbyJS core contributors. The open source Gatsby project started in 2015 to provide a framework for developers to quickly build websites with React. As the project soared in popularity, Mathews formed a company to fund its ongoing development and further invest in the growing Gatsby ecosystem of products.

This round of funding will enable Gatsby to grow its 35-person team while investing in open source and cloud services that complement the company’s products.

“With Gatsby, we’re striving to create a business model that will drive many millions of dollars of investment in open-source tools and enable people to build the next generation of web experiences,” Mathews said.

At the forefront of the company’s vision is the idea of “reinventing website development.” Gatsby has popularized the concept of a “content mesh,” a platform that provides the infrastructure layer for a decoupled website and reimagines the role of a CMS within this architecture.

Gatsby’s goal of creating more integrations for CMS’s was a big part of Mathews’ funding announcement. Instead of writing off LAMP stack architecture as slow and obsolete, Gatsby is creating bridges to the CMS’s that power a large portion of the web:

Instead of a monolithic CMS powering everything, Gatsby ties together specialized services with a modern development experience and optimized website delivery.

This content mesh empowers developers while preserving content creators’ workflows. It gives developers access to great cloud services without the pain of manual integration.

Web developers from dozens of web CMS communities like WordPress and Drupal are going “headless” and using Gatsby as the presentation layer for their CMS.

We’re forming partnerships with these communities to create seamless integrations between their solutions and Gatsby.

Gatsby will be using some of its funding to invest more heavily in the WordPress ecosystem. The company hired hiring Jason Bahl, creator of the GraphQL for WordPress project, in June, and plans to add more WordPress developers.

“We recently hired someone else to work alongside Jason in developing WPGraphQL (announcement coming soon!) and are currently hiring for several roles on the team,” Mathews told the Tavern.

WordPress powers 34.6% of the top 10 million websites and Matt Mullenweg has previously estimated its ecosystem to be a $10 billion industry. The CMS is showing no signs of decline, and is a market that Gatsby product developers are strategically targeting.

WordPress adopted React as its JavaScript framework in 2017, and built its new Gutenberg editor on top of it. Although some early adopters began digging deeper into React and creating their own products with it, the majority of PHP developers have been slow to move in that direction. Gatsby provides a bridge for those who are just getting started.

“We think that for many web developers, a Gatsby project may be the first time they are using React, GraphQL, webpack or even Node.js,” Mathews said. “And that’s not just the case for WordPress developers – the same can be true for professionals in the Drupal, Rails, or .NET ecosystems.

“It’s our goal to make a framework that empowers developers to use these technologies easily, then dive deeper as they gain more experience. So, instead of taking days to configure webpack for the first time, you can use a Gatsby Theme that connects to WordPress as a data source, and automatically get a blazing fast site. Later, you can learn the innards of the system, and begin customizing Gatsby yourself.”

While Gatsby as a framework enables developers to bypass a lot of the technical and tooling jargon that has made modern development so complex, it is still a framework geared almost exclusively towards developers. Mathews said the company’s vision will continue to focus on enabling developers, not on creating solutions to make Gatsby more accessible to the non-technical crowd.

“We are focused on making Gatsby the best choice for WordPress developers who want a flexible and powerful presentation layer for their headless WordPress sites,” he said. “Non-technical team members or clients will still use WordPress to create and manage content, while the web developers on their team or at the agency they hired get to be productive using the best development tools available.”

Gatsby plans to use the funding to invest $3 million per year in open source, including the core Gatsby project, official plugins, and more learning materials. The funding is also good news for the future of the WPGraphQL project, which should see deeper integration with Gatsby in the near future.

WPTavern: Long-Needed Date/Time Improvements Land in Core

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 09/26/2019 - 16:33

After more than a year and several WordPress updates, an overhaul of the core Date/Time component concluded. WordPress 5.3 will ship with fixes for long-standing bugs and new API functions.

Andrey “Rarst” Savchenko spearheaded this project and worked through most of the issues in his WP Date fork of WordPress. Much of his work toward addressing the problems with this core component goes back further with the initialization of his WPDateTime project.

Diving into the Date/Time component is no small feat. Addressing one issue leads to another. It’s a rabbit hole that few in the community have navigated. Many developers were also unaware of the issues. However, the bugs lingered for years, and users had no working solution for the problems they were facing.

The most common errors were caused by core bugs or developer errors due to compatibility issues, described Savchenko. This would cause user-facing issues such as post scheduling and other time-based operations.

With the release of WordPress 5.3, all existing functions should behave more reliably. Developers working on the component fixed several bugs and updated incorrect inline code documentation for many core functions. Along with the fixes, 5.3 will ship with new Date/Time API functions. The updated API includes unified time zone retrieval, localization, and PHP interoperability functions.

Savchenko called it “the slow descent into madness” when asked of the catalyst for diving into the Date/Time component and its underlying issues. “I started to notice serious bugs in the component from WordPress Stack Exchange questions about them, and the more I looked over years the more clear the dire state of it became to me.”

One of the major problems is the way WordPress handles timestamps. “I actually had to invent the ‘WordPress timestamp’ term,” said Savchenko. “There was no name for it in core development and inline documentation incorrectly called these Unix timestamps before.” WordPress adds a time zone offset to the real Unix timestamp, which causes issues with upstream PHP and external systems.

WordPress timestamps couldn’t be removed from core without breaking backward compatibility. Plugin and theme developers should avoid working with the WordPress timestamp and opt to use the recommended methods outlined in Savchenko’s post.

WordPress date functions were originally written in PHP 4, a version of PHP so long-dead that it’s almost not worth digging up the end-of-life date (it’s 11 years, by the way). PHP 5.2 introduced the PHP DateTime and DateTimeZone classes and has continued receiving improvements over the years. WordPress date functions were never updated to utilize newer standards. The platform’s more recent bump to a minimum of PHP 5.6 also meant that the DateTimeImmutable class introduced in PHP 5.5 would be available. The version bump helped land the new API functions in WordPress 5.3.

Some bugs go as far back as 7 years, such as shorthand formats not working with the core date_i18n() function, which was fixed in WordPress 5.1. With any luck, core may also adopt such features as user-based timezones in the future, which would better handle time differences on WordPress installs with users all over the world.

Gary: Talking with WP&UP

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 09/26/2019 - 04:35

At WordCamp Europe this year, I had the opportunity to chat with the folks at WP&UP, who are doing wonderful work providing mental health support in the WordPress community.

Listen to the podcast, and check out the services that WP&UP provide!

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