Wordpress News

GDS (GovUK)

Drupal Themes - Sat, 06/02/2018 - 17:42

The GDS theme for Drupal aims to be a base theme for all GovUK sites looking to implement the GDS style guide and design patterns.

It uses the GOV.UK template, frontend toolkit and elements - https://www.gov.uk/service-manual/design/using-the-govuk-template-fronte...

Requirements

* npm
* sass

Mark Jaquith: Lessons Learned Making ScoutDocs: Outsourcing

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 06/01/2018 - 14:11

Now that ScoutDocs is in the WordPress plugin repository, I’d like to share some lessons I learned making it. Every project teaches me something — this one taught me a lot.

What is ScoutDocs? ScoutDocs is a WordPress plugin that adds simple file-sharing to your WordPress site. You can upload files (which are stored securely in the cloud and served over HTTPS via a global CDN), and share them with individuals or groups of individuals. Email notifications are also handled by the ScoutDocs service, getting around the issue of reliable email delivery on a shared host. You can require that recipients accept or decline the files you’ve shared, e.g. so you can see which of your employees has seen the new employee handbook. Instead of files living as email attachments (if they even fit) or off on some third-party site, people can access them on your site.

In this weekly series, I’m going to cover:

  • Outsourcing
  • React
  • WordPress Rest API
  • PHP 7
  • Build tools
  • Unit testing

First up, lessons learned about outsourcing.

When we started making ScoutDocs, the question was raised as to whether it would be beneficial to outsource any of the coding. My time was valuable and limited, so I figured that if I had another developer code while I slept, I could spend an hour in the morning reviewing the code and giving them direction for the next workday. I had visions of quickly scanning code while my morning coffee brewed, twirling an invisible moustache, and muttering “good, good.”

This is not what happened.

The issue I quickly ran into was that for any nebulously defined problem, someone else’s solution was unlikely to match what I wanted. Their assumptions would not be the same as mine. As a result, the odds of me being happy with their solution were very low.

I spent a lot of time rewriting code.

And because I was spending all my time “fixing” the code I wasn’t really looking at the product as a whole.

When the contractors were done, my ScoutDocs partners and I looked at it, and we realized that it… was bad. Forget code quality, which despite all my vain reshuffling was still lacking: what we had was just overall a terrible user experience. Rather horrifyingly, we admitted that what we needed to do to give it the user experience we wanted was nothing short of a total rewrite.

I rolled up my sleeves, learned React, and rewrote ScoutDocs until almost nothing of the original code and user experience remained.

So was outsourcing a waste? Not completely. Some code was retained, mostly relating to the Amazon S3 interface. I was glad that someone else had experienced the singular joy of spending an eternity lost in a maze of Amazon Web Services documentation and confusing code samples. Additionally, if I had set out to build the initial version of the code, it would have taken a lot of my time (which I did not have much to spare), and might have meant that our horrifying realization would have been delayed for several months.

Knowing what doesn’t work is valuable, even if you have to throw it away. That’s mostly what we had gotten for our money: figuring out what didn’t work. If outsourcing can get you to these realizations sooner or for less money, it might be well worth it.

As I rewrote the software, my partners asked me a few times if I regretted outsourcing. I didn’t, for the above reason, but also because outsourcing had solved some of the coding issues that would have been a slog for me. However, if I was doing it all over again, I would have done more work upfront to identify specific, well-defined tasks that I wanted to outsource.

Delegation makes sense when the task is well-defined. At the extreme, you could spend so much time redoing work and asking for revisions that you’d have been better off just doing it yourself. If you can specify exactly what constitutes success in a task, and the time it takes you to specify that is much less than the time it would take you to do the task, outsource it.

Check back next week for my thoughts on rewriting ScoutDocs in React.

Dev Blog: The Month in WordPress: May 2018

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 06/01/2018 - 09:09

This month saw two significant milestones in the WordPress community — the 15th anniversary of the project, and GDPR-related privacy tools coming to WordPress Core. Read on to find out more about this and everything else that happened in the WordPress community in May.

Local Communities Celebrate the 15th Anniversary of WordPress

Last Sunday, May 27, WordPress turned 15 years old. This is a noteworthy occasion for an open-source project like WordPress and one well worth celebrating. To mark the occasion, WordPress communities across the world gathered for parties and meetups in honor of the milestone.

Altogether, there were 224 events globally, with a few more of those still scheduled to take place in some communities — attend one in your area if you can.

If your city doesn’t have a WordPress meetup group, this is a great opportunity to start one! Learn how with the Meetup Organizer Handbook, and join the #community-events channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

Privacy Tools added to WordPress core

In light of recent changes to data privacy regulations in the EU, WordPress Core shipped important updates in the v4.9.6 release, giving site owners tools to help them comply with the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). It is worth noting, however, that WordPress cannot ensure you are compliant — this is still a site owner’s responsibility.

The new privacy tools include a number of features focused on providing privacy and personal data management to all site users — asking commenters for explicit consent to store their details in a cookie, providing site owners with an easy way to publish a Privacy Policy, and providing data export and erasure tools to all site users that can be extended by plugins to allow the handling of data that they introduce.

To find out more about these features and the other updates, read the 4.9.6 update guide. You can also get involved in contributing to this part of WordPress Core by jumping into the #core-privacy channel in the Making WordPress Slack group, and following the Core team blog.

Updates to the WordPress.org Privacy Policy

In a similar vein, WordPress.org itself has received an updated Privacy Policy to make clear what is being tracked and how your data is handled. Along with that, a Cookie Policy has also been added to explain just what is collected and stored in your browser when using the site.

These policies cover all sites on the WordPress.org network — including WordPress.org, WordPress.net, WordCamp.org, BuddyPress.org, bbPress.org, and other related domains and subdomains. It’s important to note that this does not mean that anything has changed in terms of data storage; rather that these documents clarify what data is stored and how it is handled.

Further Reading:

If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.

The Month in WordPress: May 2018

Wordpress News - Fri, 06/01/2018 - 09:09

This month saw two significant milestones in the WordPress community — the 15th anniversary of the project, and GDPR-related privacy tools coming to WordPress Core. Read on to find out more about this and everything else that happened in the WordPress community in May.

Local Communities Celebrate the 15th Anniversary of WordPress

Last Sunday, May 27, WordPress turned 15 years old. This is a noteworthy occasion for an open-source project like WordPress and one well worth celebrating. To mark the occasion, WordPress communities across the world gathered for parties and meetups in honor of the milestone.

Altogether, there were 224 events globally, with a few more of those still scheduled to take place in some communities — attend one in your area if you can.

If your city doesn’t have a WordPress meetup group, this is a great opportunity to start one! Learn how with the Meetup Organizer Handbook, and join the #community-events channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

Privacy Tools added to WordPress core

In light of recent changes to data privacy regulations in the EU, WordPress Core shipped important updates in the v4.9.6 release, giving site owners tools to help them comply with the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). It is worth noting, however, that WordPress cannot ensure you are compliant — this is still a site owner’s responsibility.

The new privacy tools include a number of features focused on providing privacy and personal data management to all site users — asking commenters for explicit consent to store their details in a cookie, providing site owners with an easy way to publish a Privacy Policy, and providing data export and erasure tools to all site users that can be extended by plugins to allow the handling of data that they introduce.

To find out more about these features and the other updates, read the 4.9.6 update guide. You can also get involved in contributing to this part of WordPress Core by jumping into the #core-privacy channel in the Making WordPress Slack group, and following the Core team blog.

Updates to the WordPress.org Privacy Policy

In a similar vein, WordPress.org itself has received an updated Privacy Policy to make clear what is being tracked and how your data is handled. Along with that, a Cookie Policy has also been added to explain just what is collected and stored in your browser when using the site.

These policies cover all sites on the WordPress.org network — including WordPress.org, WordPress.net, WordCamp.org, BuddyPress.org, bbPress.org, and other related domains and subdomains. It’s important to note that this does not mean that anything has changed in terms of data storage; rather that these documents clarify what data is stored and how it is handled.

Further Reading:

If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.

WPTavern: Community Spotlight: James Huff (MacManX)

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 06/01/2018 - 02:38

Providing support on the WordPress.org forums is one of the easiest ways to contribute to WordPress and those who do are some of the unsung heroes of the project. One of those heroes is James Huff known as MacManX on the forums.

Huff has been supporting users for 13 years and recently celebrated an awesome milestone reaching 50K replies.

Achievement Unlocked: Over 13 years of @WordPress support, and 50,000 replies: https://t.co/0un3ggrKGI pic.twitter.com/aKiwOuesk8

— James Huff (@MacManX) May 30, 2018

In this spotlight, we learn what drives Huff to provide support, what he’s learned, and what users can do to improve the likelihood a support request will be resolved.

What drives your desire to help people with WordPress on the support forums?

I like helping people succeed with WordPress. It’s kind of a legacy for me, because you never know if solving one blocker will lead to a life-changing site or service. If anything, I hope I made a few days better for a few folks.

Any trends or common issues you’ve noticed in the past few months/years?

Nothing out of the ordinary. Plugin and theme conflicts will always be the most common.

What tips or suggestions do you have for users to increase the likelihood of solving their problem?

Try the Health Check plugin first, its Troubleshooting Mode is great!

What lessons have you learned by providing support in the forums?

I learned about almost everything I have done to customize my sites first by helping someone else do it. Overall, I have learned quite a bit about WordPress just by helping other people.

To learn more about James and how he got involved with supporting the WordPress community, watch this presentation by Andrea Middleton from WordCamp Seattle 2017.



WPTavern: WPWeekly Episode 318 – Happy 15th Birthday WordPress 0.70

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 06/01/2018 - 01:27

In this episode, John James Jacoby and I look back at 15 years of WordPress. We discuss the journey so far and where we think the project is going. Hint, it involves JavaScript. We also do a bit of self-reflection on how WordPress fits into our lives and where we see us fitting into its future. For giggles, we did some WordPress trivia as well.

Stories Discussed:

Matt’s Birthday Post
WordPress Now Available
WordPress Release History
#wp15 on Twitter

WPWeekly Meta:

Next Episode: Wednesday, June 6th 3:00 P.M. Eastern

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via Itunes

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via RSS

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via Stitcher Radio

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via Google Play

Listen To Episode #318:

HeroPress: Freedom to Parent

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 05/31/2018 - 14:00

In any post about how WordPress changes lives the word Freedom invariably comes up. Freedom to be yourself, to travel, to grow, learn, even age. This week’s replay is about the freedom to parent.

Ines was a young single mother without advanced education during an economic downturn. Things seemed bleak.

Through her own hard work and effort she learned the fundamentals of web development, but it was WordPress that allowed her to pursue that profession from her own home. She was able to be home with her baby and care for him the way she saw fit. He was able to grow getting to know his mother every day instead of a day care worker.

WordPress can be an incredible source of freedom for single parents, allowing them to have a solid career while also being good parents.

Getting A Life

The post Freedom to Parent appeared first on HeroPress.

WPTavern: One Way to Whitelist and Blacklist Blocks in Gutenberg

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 05/31/2018 - 01:07

Gutenberg ships with a number of blocks but what if your client or project doesn’t need most of them? The Gutenberg Handbook explains how to create a whitelist and a blacklist for blocks but in some circumstances, Gutenberg does not respect the allowed_block_types filter.

Jason Bahl, a WordPress Engineer at Digital First Media, published a tutorial that explains how to whitelist and blacklist blocks using a filterable, localized array.

One thing to keep in mind is that Gutenberg development is in a high state of flux and Bahl warns that his technique is fragile and will likely cause things to break over time. He suggests keeping a close eye on Gutenberg development to see how blacklisting/whitelisting evolves in the plugin.

WPTavern: WordCamp US 2018 is Accepting Speaker Proposals Until July 1st

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 05/30/2018 - 23:36

WordCamp US has announced it is accepting speaker proposals until July 1st, 11:59p.m. CDT. The event takes place December 7-9, 2018, in Nashville, TN.

Those interested in speaking can submit an application through the Call for Speakers site. The site contains session ideas, a list of speaker benefits, and tips for submissions.

To see a list of sessions and speakers from last year’s event, check out the 2017 WordCamp US website.

xBase

Drupal Themes - Mon, 05/28/2018 - 18:22

Features:

  • SMACSS
  • SCSS
  • Include starter theme
  • Change default jQuery UI Dialog settings
  • AJAX improvements
  • Include OwlCarousel
  • Include jQuery plugin jquery.clicktoggle.js

Akismet: Version 4.0.7 of the Akismet WordPress Plugin Is Now Available

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 05/28/2018 - 16:34

Version 4.0.7 of the Akismet plugin for WordPress is now available.

4.0.7 contains the following changes:

  • Based on user feedback, the link on “Learn how your comment data is processed.” in the optional privacy notice now has a target of _blank and opens in a new tab/window.
  • Updated the in-admin privacy notice to use the term “comment” instead of “contact” in “Akismet can display a notice to your users under your comment forms.”
  • Only show in-admin privacy notice if Akismet has an API Key configured

To upgrade, visit the Updates page of your WordPress dashboard and follow the instructions. If you need to download the plugin zip file directly, links to all versions are available in the WordPress plugins directory.

Flow2

Drupal Themes - Mon, 05/28/2018 - 10:16

Flow2 is a Masonry Grid Layout based theme and design inspiration is taken from http://flow.elated-themes.com/flow2/

Masonry is a JavaScript grid layout library. It works by placing elements in optimal position based on available vertical space, sort of like a mason fitting stones in a wall. You’ve probably seen it in use all over the Internet.

Requirements:

Akismet: Version 4.0.6 of the Akismet WordPress Plugin Is Now Available

Wordpress Planet - Sat, 05/26/2018 - 17:32

Version 4.0.6 of the Akismet plugin for WordPress is now available. If you are paying attention to version numbers, you will notice that we went from 4.0.3 to 4.0.6 in one day. This is because we got user reports of issues with older versions of PHP with our intermediary versions, which we jumped on fixing right away.

4.0.6 contains the following changes:

  • Added a hook to provide Akismet-specific privacy information for a site’s privacy policy.

  • Added tools to control the display of a privacy related notice under comment forms.

  • Fixed HTML in activation failure message to close META and HEAD tag properly.

  • Fixed a bug that would sometimes prevent Akismet from being correctly auto-configured.

To upgrade, visit the Updates page of your WordPress dashboard and follow the instructions. If you need to download the plugin zip file directly, links to all versions are available in the WordPress plugins directory.

Post Status: The History of the Web, and WordPress’s 15th Birthday — Draft Podcast

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 05/25/2018 - 21:42

Welcome to the Post Status Draft podcast, which you can find on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, and via RSS for your favorite podcatcher. Post Status Draft is hosted by Brian Krogsgard and co-host Brian Richards.

In this episode, Brian is joined by guest-host Jay Hoffmann. Jay is the Lead Developer at Reaktiv Studios and the creator and curator of The History of the Web. It is a good time to discuss the history of the web with Jay, as WordPress is ready to celebrate its 15th birthday.

Be sure to subscribe to Jay’s newsletter on the History of the Web website to receive new articles on such a fascinating project.

Brian and Jay discuss his work at Reaktiv, his prior work at Sesame Street Workshop and Random House, and the project he’s worked on for two years now documenting the web’s timeline and history. It was a fun discussion on all fronts.

Links Sponsor: WooCommerce

WooCommerce makes the most customizable eCommerce software on the planet, and it’s the most popular too. You can build just about anything with WooCommerce. Try it today, and thanks to the team at WooCommerce being a Post Status partner

WPTavern: The First Release of WordPress Turns 15 Years Old

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 05/25/2018 - 19:41

This Sunday, May 27th, marks the 15th anniversary of the first release of WordPress. Users are celebrating the occasion across the world with huge cakes, cupcakes, memorable photos, parties, and meetups.
.

Now that’s a cake! #wp15 pic.twitter.com/i8lAr4SLsO

— WordPress Cape Town (@WPCapeTown) May 24, 2018

To see if there is an event near you, visit the official WordPress 15th anniversary site and type your city into the search box. You can also follow the festivities on Twitter by browsing the #WP15 hashtag.

If you’re thinking about hosting a party and want to use the WordPress logo on a cake or other bakery items, you’re in luck. The WordPress Foundation has amended the WordPress Trademark Policy to allow people to put the logo on baked goods.

*** Attention: If you’re interested in putting the WordPress logo on a cake, cookie, cupcake, babka, or other celebratory food in honor of the WordPress 15th Anniversary… yes, this is OK under the Trademark policy. ***

WordPress Trademark Policy

In 2015, we highlighted 93Digital‘s WordPress Time Machine. The company has continued to update the timeline with images of the WordPress 4.6, 4.7, 4.8, and 4.9 backends along with their default themes. The timeline is a quick way to see how WordPress has evolved over 15 years.

93Digital WordPress Time Machine

Don’t forget that you can use the coupon code CELEBRATEWP15 to take 15% off any swag you purchase on the WordPress Swag store. The coupon code is good through the end of the year.

Will you be celebrating WordPress’ birthday this weekend? If so, how and where? Let us know!

CorporateClassic

Drupal Themes - Fri, 05/25/2018 - 16:02

Features in this theme
Responsive, Mobile-Friendly Drupal Theme based on Skeleton Boilerplate
Color module integration (with 2 extra Color Schemes)
1-column, 2-columns and 3-columns layout support
Column Shortcodes with Media Queries (one_third, one_fourth, two_thirds, one_half)
Superfish module Support - Read more
Linked Superfish menu colors with Color core module
Multi-level CSS dropdown menus - Read more
jQuery Responsive Menu Plugin which turns your site's navigation into a dropdown select list when your browser is at mobile widths - Read more
A total of 14 regions (Header top left, Header top right, Header right, Header, Highlighted, Content, Sidebar first, Sidebar second, Featured left, Featured right, Footer first, Footer second, Footer third, Footer, Help)
Cross-browser CSS3 buttons in various colors and sizes (white, gray, black, lightblue, blue, darkblue, lightgreen, green, darkgreen, lightred, red, darkred, yellow, orange, brown - small, medium, large)
Blog core module support
Support for standard Drupal theme features: logo, site-name, slogan, user pictures in comments and nodes
Detailed CSS rules for:
Typography
Feed Pages
Comments
Comment form
Contact form
User pictures in Comments
Forum core module pages
“Read more”, “Comment” and all other buttons
User profiles

Dev Blog: WordPress.org Privacy Policy Updates

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 05/25/2018 - 08:06

The WordPress.org privacy policy has been updated, hurray! While we weren’t able to remove all the long sentences, we hope you find the revisions make it easier to understand:

  • how we collect and use data,
  • how long the data we collect is retained, and
  • how you can request a copy of the data you’ve shared with us.

There hasn’t been any change to the data that WordPress.org collects or how that data is used; the privacy policy just provides more detail now. Happy reading, and thanks for using WordPress!

 

WordPress.org Privacy Policy Updates

Wordpress News - Fri, 05/25/2018 - 08:06

The WordPress.org privacy policy has been updated, hurray! While we weren’t able to remove all the long sentences, we hope you find the revisions make it easier to understand:

  • how we collect and use data,
  • how long the data we collect is retained, and
  • how you can request a copy of the data you’ve shared with us.

There hasn’t been any change to the data that WordPress.org collects or how that data is used; the privacy policy just provides more detail now. Happy reading, and thanks for using WordPress!

 

WPTavern: WPWeekly Episode 317 – Minor Major Major Minor Release

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 05/24/2018 - 19:44

In this episode, John James Jacoby and I discuss Adobe’s acquisition of Magento, feedback regarding WordPress 4.9.6, when 4.9.7 might ship, an unofficial WordCamp app for iOS, and whether or not it’s time for WordPress auto updates to occur for every version. I describe what it’s like having poison ivy on my face and my continuing woes with lawn care equipment.

Stories Discussed:

Adobe to acquire Magento for $1.68B
WordPress 4.9.7 will include patch to fix an issue that caused fatal 500 errors
You can use the WordPress logo on bakery goods to celebrate WordPress’ birthday
Marcel Schmitz Releases Unofficial WordCamp for iOS App
Music: A Gutenberg-Powered Theme
GDPR for WordPress Developers: Announcing the (Free) Anonymization Addon   
BuddyPress 3.0.0 “Apollo”

Picks of the Week:

Panic Mode the card game. A cooperative card game of office politics during Disaster Recovery for up to 8 players.

WPWeekly Meta:

Next Episode: Wednesday, May 30th 3:00 P.M. Eastern

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via Itunes

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via RSS

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via Stitcher Radio

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via Google Play

Listen To Episode #317:

WPTavern: Why Sites Didn’t Automatically Update to WordPress 4.9.6

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 05/24/2018 - 00:32

WordPress 4.9.6 was released last week and was labeled a minor release. Minor releases trigger WordPress’ automatic update system. Shortly after its release, some users began questioning why their sites were not automatically updating to 4.9.6. I wondered the same thing after logging into a site I maintain and discovering it had not updated.

It turns out that the WordPress Development team disabled the auto update system after discovering that a few plugins were incorrectly loading the new privacy features and triggering fatal 500 errors on the frontend of user’s sites.

The issue stems from privacy code that includes a file that was not expected to be loaded without the rest of the WordPress admin. Mika Epstein, a volunteer member of the plugin review team, personally contacted the affected plugin developers last weekend to help rectify the issue.

A recent scan of the WordPress plugin directory shows that there are no other plugins incorrectly loading the privacy code. However, automatic updates for WordPress 4.9.6 remain disabled until the release of WordPress 4.9.7.

WordPress 4.9.7 will fix the issue described above and include a few other bug fixes. Since auto updates will be enabled for 4.9.7, sites running on 4.9.5 should auto update to 4.9.7 when it’s released. WordPress 4.9.7 is expected to be released sometime after the Memorial Day holiday (Monday, May 28th). Until then, users will need to manually update to 4.9.6.

*Updated 5/23/2018 9:28 PM EST*

Earlier this evening, Gary Pendergast enabled auto updates for WordPress 4.9.6 and the team is monitoring for any new errors that are triggered. So far, 20K sites have updated without any notable problems.



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