Wordpress News

Eatery DS

Drupal Themes - Mon, 01/13/2020 - 17:25

Eatery DS is a responsive Drupal 8 theme for Hotel & restaurant related websites.

Features

  • Drupal 8.7 core
  • Multiple Pages
  • Booking Reservation Page

Live Demo

Download Demo


Demo Site Credential


Credits

Drupal theme by DrupalSlave

Beginner Theme

Drupal Themes - Sun, 01/12/2020 - 14:11

This is a simple Drupal Theme for beginner developers to Drupal.

Beginner Theme

Drupal Themes - Sun, 01/12/2020 - 14:11

This is a simple Drupal Theme for beginner developers to Drupal.

WPTavern: Upcoming Tailwind CSS 1.2.0 Includes Grid Support and New Utilities

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 01/10/2020 - 21:11

Adam Wathan, creator of the Tailwind CSS, published the early release notes for the upcoming version 1.2.0 update to the framework. The new version will include the much-anticipated support for CSS grids and several other useful features for app and website designers. There are no planned breaking changes with the update.

Tailwind CSS is a utility-first CSS framework that is quickly gaining support from designers and developers. Some WordPress themes are starting to pop up in the public sphere that use it, but is more often used as part of the in-house toolset at agencies, in which standards are necessary to keep teams on the same page.

For developers already using the framework, they can look for an update within days. “Right now I don’t have any changes to these features planned, so as long as nobody finds any huge issues I’ll tag the real v1.2.0 next week once I get some documentation together,” said Wathan on Twitter.

Now is a good time for new developers to start tinkering with the CSS framework. With the addition of new CSS grid classes, there is little that is not possible for the majority of use cases.

I have been building with Tailwind, or a subset of its classes, for about a year now. Aside from highly-custom scenarios, I have been able to build most projects while writing little CSS code. For someone who comes primarily from a developer background, it has been a godsend for quickly putting together complex layouts. CSS grid support was the big item I had been waiting for. I had already built a custom grid system based on Tailwind’s naming scheme. My implementation is nearly the same as what is shipping in Tailwind CSS 1.2.0.

Other new features include classes for CSS features such as:

  • transition
  • transform
  • stroke-width
  • box-sizing
  • clear

Version 1.2.0 adds extra utility classes for rounded corners and shadow sizes. It also extends its support for setting an element’s maximum width. New utility classes were added for removing a max-width and setting it based on predefined breakpoints.

The Inter font now sits at the top of the font stack and will be used if installed on the user’s system or if the developer loads it on the site. Inter is a popular font created specifically for computer screens. It comes in both fixed and variable options. The Twenty Twenty theme released with WordPress 5.3 uses the variable version of Inter for several elements within its design.

For developers who are extending Tailwind CSS, they now have a new plugin API for building custom plugins. Plugins can also extend the user’s configuration file.

Overall, it looks like it will be a solid update. I am excited about digging into it and using some of the new utility classes.

Panache

Drupal Themes - Fri, 01/10/2020 - 13:13

A multi purpose theme based on bootstrap 4.

Panache

Drupal Themes - Fri, 01/10/2020 - 13:13

A multi purpose theme based on bootstrap 4.

WPTavern: Gutenberg 7.2 Adds Long-Awaited Multi-Button Block and Gallery Image Size Option

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 01/09/2020 - 20:47

The Gutenberg team released version 7.2 of the plugin yesterday after a four-week release hiatus for the holidays. This update includes at least 180 pull requests to the project’s repository by 56 contributors. The largest user-facing features include a new “buttons” block that allows users to add multiple buttons in a row and the ability to define the size of images in a gallery block. These were two highly-requested features.

The update supports changing the font size in the relatively new navigation block. Users can also add a link for the image in the media & text block. A few dozen other minor enhancements across multiple components made their way into the update. Most enhancements continue to clean up the interface and improve usability.

Many bug fixes are included in version 7.2. Accessibility improvements include using radio inputs for text alignment, adding an appropriate group role to the block wrapper, adding a label to the social icons block, and more. Several fixes should improve how pasting content in the editor works, which generally works well already.

The team continued building upon experimental features, which must be activated via the Gutenberg > Experiments screen in the admin. Outside of a handful of bug fixes and enhancements, the most interesting change is the introduction of a new experimental admin screen. Gutenberg 7.2 now includes an early beta of a full-site editing page.

Adding Buttons in a Row Adding multiple buttons within the Buttons block.

If I had a nickel for every time a user asked how to put two buttons next to each other…You know how the story goes.

One of the most-common website layouts today is a large “hero” section, a heading, some text, and a button, perhaps two. An end-user could easily build this with a combination of the cover, heading, paragraph, and button blocks if only a single button was needed. However, that second button was troubling without some custom code work.

The introduction of the buttons block changes everything. It is a block that allows end-users to add any number of individual button blocks in a row. At the moment, the block essentially serves as a wrapper. The block’s only option is the ability to set the alignment of the inner button blocks.

Image Size Selector for Galleries Selecting a custom image size for the Gallery block.

The lack of an option to set the size of gallery images has been one of Gutenberg’s largest failures since its inception. After years of this basic option for the gallery shortcode with the classic editor, the gallery block has always felt incomplete.

For some users, the lack of basic features that have long existed in the classic editor is frustrating. That frustration is understandable, given the fast-paced movement on newer and shinier features. It is refreshing to see work being done toward addressing long-missing features such as this.

The gallery block now has a new “Images Sizes” dropdown select for choosing the size of the images shown. This option will solve at least a couple of major issues. By selecting a custom size, the images will utilize less bandwidth for site visitors. Previously, full-sized images were displayed. It also allows users to select a consistent size so that galleries with multiple image aspect ratios are better aligned in a grid. Basically, it can make for prettier galleries.

Site Editor Screen Beta Testing the beta Site Editor screen.

Gutenberg 7.2 introduces a “Site Editor” screen, which can be enabled by ticking the “Enable Full Site Editing” checkbox on the Gutenberg > Experiments admin page. The new screen is an early, bare-bones beta exploration into what will eventually be fully-fledged site editor.

At this point, the screen does not do much. End-users can insert blocks and little else. Content on this screen is not stored for later. There is not even a save button yet. Mostly, it serves as another step toward site editing, which could possibly land in core WordPress late in 2020. However, that is an optimistic schedule, and it is far too early to make a solid guess. There are a lot of open questions that need answers and technical hurdles to jump. A 2021 release might be more realistic, depending on the pace of development.

WPTavern: BobWP.com Shifts Focus to WooCommerce, Rebrands as ‘Do the Woo’

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 01/08/2020 - 21:07

BobWP.com announced yesterday that the site and its podcast would be rebranded to “Do the Woo at BobWP .” After a decade of more generalized WordPress topics and news, it will now focus specifically on the WooCommerce plugin and its community. The podcast will also be aired weekly, notching up their previous twice-monthly episodes.

For Bob Dunn, founder and co-host, this was move was a natural result of where the community he had built was heading. “Over the last 3 years, we have consistently created content around WooCommerce on our site,” he said. “I saw that this was what our readers wanted, so built that up and in March of last year, made the decision to focus entirely on WooCommerce.”

Dunn said he has been a fan of WooCommerce since its launch. “It has always been a favorite of mine, and I have used it to sell a lot of stuff. But oddly enough, never physical products.”

Starting in 2020, the podcast will run weekly. To keep up the brisk pace, the show is bringing on two new co-hosts. Joining the team is Jonathan Wold, community lead for WooCommerce, and Mendel Kurland, developer advocate a Liquid Web. Brad Williams, CEO of WebDevStudios, has been a co-host since 2018.

New episodes of the podcast will air every Thursday. The show is pre-recorded on Tuesday of the same week, so the content should remain timely.

Do the Woo will specifically cater to its WooCommerce audience, but it may delve into the larger eCommerce world from time to time. However, Dunn recommends listening in on the WP eCommerce Show for topics that explore the larger WordPress and eCommerce landscape.

Dunn does not feel like there will be a shortage of topics to explore every week with WooCommerce-specific content. “At first, yes, it is a bit of a challenge finding topics around it,” he said. “But, expanding it to bring in more of what people are doing in the space, no matter how big or small, opens it up more.” He is optimistic about the show’s future. “I’ll dig as deep as I need to go. And, with its growth, it may come to the time where there will always be more [content] than I need.”

The podcast’s format remains simple. “We basically bring a guest in, learn more about what they are doing and their involvement in the Woo ecosystem,” said Dunn. “We wrap it up, typically covering two or three news items. The conversation isn’t planned at all. We just take it where it leads us.”

Dunn originally began the Doo the Woo podcast in 2016 but broadened the scope that same year to WordPress and eCommerce. “I missed it, and at the end of 2017, brought it back as more of an interview-style show, with me and a guest,” he said. “For the next few months, I did very few shows and felt I need to change it up to be more conversational.” He brought on Williams as a co-host at that point. “We did a few shows where Brad and I would just chat Woo stuff, and both came to the conclusion it would be fun to bring on a guest, but still keeping it conversational.”

The podcast episodes were sporadic until the middle of 2019, which was the start of the bi-weekly schedule. Today, with three extra co-hosts, the team can rotate who is hosting a particular episode.

Dunn said he still catches a few other podcasts but not as many as in the past. “Always been a fan of and still listen to Matt Report and Get Options,” he said. “I am sure I have listened to just about every WP-centric podcast a few times over the years. Without naming each one, there are several good choices depending on what you are looking for. Podcast listening is a very personal choice and I just recommend people dabble in what is out there and find those that click with you.”

Listen to episode 33 where the team discusses the show’s plans for 2020 and beyond:

WPTavern: Landing Kit for WordPress Maps Any Post or Page to a Custom Domain

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 01/08/2020 - 03:34

Phil Kurth and Jason Schuller launched a new WordPress product named Landing Kit today. The plugin allows end-users to map a domain name to any post, page, or custom post type entry. It includes other features such as SSL support and URL redirecting. More features like custom templates and Gutenberg blocks are on the way.

Kurth is the director and WordPress product developer at Hookturn.io, a premium WordPress plugin company, and runs Awesome ACF, a community hub around the Advanced Custom Fields plugin. Schuller has several ongoing projects. He runs RIVYT, a website for video creators to share their work. In October, he launched DSKO, which is a discovery network built on WordPress for creators and brands.

Leeflets, a project Schuller created for building single-page websites, served as the catalyst for the Landing Kit project. The plugin brings similar functionality to any WordPress install.

Often, WordPress is overkill for single-page sites. The platform is ideal for larger sites and applications. For people who need to manage multiple single-page sites, Landing Kit could be a blessing. By setting up a single WordPress install with the plugin active, users can map any domain to any post or page. It also works with custom post types. This keeps site management limited to a single admin interface and point of maintenance.

The plugin should not be confused with domain-mapping plugins built for multisite. While it will work on multisite, the intent is not to map domains to subsites in a network. Instead, it is meant to specifically map domains to single posts or pages on single-site installations.

The plugin has two pricing tiers. The lower tier costs $59 per year for support and updates on up to three installations. It will also include access to a single page template in the near future. The larger pricing tier at $159 per year offers support and updates for unlimited installations and will provide access to all templates as they become available.

Landing Kit is Schuller’s first foray in the WordPress product market space since selling his former WordPress theme business, Press75, in 2014. His return is already making a splash and seems to be a welcome addition to the ecosystem given the feedback on his Twitter announcement.

“It was never a goal of mine to jump back in, but sometimes these things just happen naturally,” said Schuller. “I’ve consistently used WordPress as a platform to iterate on ideas, and with each new build I end up creating unique functionality to solve specific problems. Landing Kit is the result of one of those problems I had the solve while creating Leeflets.”

Kurth was brought in to work on the project because of his experience building WordPress plugins. He described the first version as not having many technical challenges because they had a working prototype to build from. “The most difficult part was thinking across multiple contexts and maintaining a clear picture of what would be happening across multiple domains at any time,” he said. “I expect more difficult challenges as we start to move deeper into feature territory as we’ll have bigger decisions to make and new technical hurdles to face, particularly when we start exploring remote block/template libraries.”

Plugin Features Potential book template for Landing Kit.

Version 1.0 of the plugin keeps things simple, which is a signature of Schuller’s past work. The plugin has a domain management screen. It provides a convenient location to edit and configure all mapped domains for the installation. Domain mapping is also available through the post-editing screen.

The SSL options allow users to serve individual domains over HTTPS or to do so on a global basis. The plugin also makes it easy to decide whether a post or page should be available via the main website or if requests to the single view should be 301 redirected to the mapped domain.

There are some technical requirements to make use of the plugin. Users must be on a host with the ability to add alias or add-on domains, have a dedicated IP address for their website, and be running WordPress 5.0 or above. End-users should also be familiar with managing DNS records, specifically A-Records, with their web host. These requirements are necessary to make sure domains are pointing to the correct location. These are common features and available through many hosts. Each host should have specific instructions for working with these features.

The big value-add will be the plugin’s custom templates and its upcoming Gutenberg blocks. These will allow users to quickly build out single-page sites that look and feel different from the active theme for their WordPress installation.

“In line with the idea of complete niche templates (essentially bundled blocks), it makes sense to break that concept down a level in form of niche specific blocks you could pick and choose to create your own landing pages with a bit more freedom,” said Schuller. “There’s so much potential with Gutenberg to get creative, especially when you’re thinking specifically about landing pages and what creators might need to achieve a specific goal.”

Kurth and Schuller plan to release templates aimed at specific product niches. “I’m hoping to get the first template out the door within the next few weeks,” said Schuller on Twitter. The concept could be interesting as templates could essentially serve as “mini themes.” If the plugin gains enough traction and a large user base, there is potential for a larger marketplace to form around single-page template designs.

Take a video tour of the plugin:

Schuller said that they are kicking around some other feature ideas for the future. Nothing is set in stone yet. “People have also expressed interest in a Leeflets-style front-end experience for managing pages, which would essentially make Landing Kit a SaaS in a box,” he said. “I’m not sure if that’s something we’ll explore in the near term, but an option at the very least.”

Update – January 8, 2020: Additional quotes from Landing Kit creators added.

WPTavern: Lessons Learned by Stepping Outside WordPress Comfort Zone

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 01/06/2020 - 21:19

It was late summer in 2018. I was an aging developer who wasn’t quite sure where I fit into the WordPress world anymore. I had spent over a decade learning the ins and outs of the platform that launched my career and also served as a hobby for other pet projects I wanted to tackle.

In part, I was bored. I needed a new challenge.

I love WordPress. More than that, I appreciate what WordPress has allowed me to accomplish over the years. However, I was no longer happy with it for my personal blog. It was suitable for the job, but I often found it had a lot more gadgets and gizmos than I needed. I had also been writing blog posts in Markdown for many years rather than the classic editor. WordPress was simply no longer a part of my workflow for my blog. At times, it was a hindrance.

Challenge accepted.

Over a weekend, I built a working custom blog system. I am hesitant to call it a Content Manage System (CMS) because it lacked crucial features, such as an administrative interface, that are at the heart of any CMS. Nevertheless, I built a working system from scratch in two days.

I had no idea I could accomplish such a feat without relying on the useful functions and tools that WordPress had so generously provided for most of my programming career. I cannot count the number of times I accidentally typed out esc_attr() or esc_html() only to remember those were WordPress functions. My WordPress muscle memory was strong. Without knowing it, everything I had learned through building on top of WordPress pushed me to become a more well-rounded PHP developer. There are few APIs I had not worked with from core WordPress. I understood much of the source code and knew the reasons for a lot of the legacy gunk.

My personal project paled in comparison to WordPress’ power and still does to this day. However, it moved me outside my comfort zone. It allowed me to explore old ideas in new ways.

One example was understanding how rewrite rules and routing worked. Some of my friends and I recently joked that no one really understands the WordPress Rewrite API. You just tinker with it until something works and the new code no longer breaks your site. There are many existing libraries out there, but I wanted to understand how this worked for my own edification. Therefore, I set out to build an HTTP request, router, and controller class. The end result was an elegant solution, which borrowed heavily from other PHP frameworks.

With a simple line of code, as shown below for setting up a “book” content type, I could handle incoming requests for a book page, map it to the correct resource, and output the template on the front end. I began to wonder why I had shied away from this foundational website concept for so many years as a developer.

// Create 'example.com/books/book-name'. $this->router->get( 'books/{name}', Controller::class );

There were many other areas where I began to question the “WordPress way” of doing things. During this journey of discovery, I was able to learn things that I could bring back for use in my WordPress projects. By stepping out into the larger world of website development, I was able to better see the flaws in the platform that helped me fall in love with programming. However, I was also better able to see the beauty in the system that thousands of developers have kept running for the preceding 15 years.

It Is Not All About Code

I had the opportunity to study and learn large frameworks like Laravel and Symfony. However, I also studied how other platforms worked from a pure user-experience perspective.

The one thing I knew for certain is that I wanted to test platforms created for people who wrote in Markdown. I wasn’t looking for huge platforms to compete with WordPress’ power, such as Joomla or Drupal. Instead, I was looking at lighter-weight solutions like Grav, Jekyll, and Hugo. I wanted to understand how the user experience fit in with my workflow.

Of all the solutions I tested, each had its advantages. Each also had features or methods of doing things that wasn’t to my taste. The good thing about the experience was that I was able to identify how I wanted my blogging platform to work for me. Reading thoughts from others in those communities also allowed me to hear from users outside of the WordPress community about why they loved their preferred blogging system.

I soldiered forward. Using what I learned from those platforms, I built something that I was happy to use. It wasn’t perfect and would likely never be. Room for growth is not a bad thing.

During this time, I rekindled my love of blogging with WordPress. While not always the popular opinion, the block editor felt leaps and bounds better than the classic editor. It was something I could see myself using regularly. Aside from my personal blog, I began using it on other projects. I still write in Markdown every day. However, I find myself enjoying writing within WordPress’ editor for the first time in years.

Why You Should Try New Platforms

From a developer perspective, it is not a good idea to become complacent and rely on a single system. Instead of calling yourself a “WordPress developer,” think beyond that terminology. Instead, you should be a PHP programmer or JavaScript programmer. Or, better yet, simply call yourself a programmer. Programmers solve problems. The tools or languages are what you use to get from Point A to Point B.

On the job market, being a more well-rounded programmer opens up more opportunities. While most of us can only hope that WordPress will be the leading platform for the next 10, 20, or 50 years, you should be prepared for any future.

Another benefit of working with other platforms from time to time is that you learn ideas that you can bring back into the WordPress ecosystem. For example, it is interesting to see how the Sage starter theme implements Laravel Blade’s templating engine. These ideas can help shape WordPress’ future.

Some ideas can be pushed into core WordPress. Others can improve team workflows within agencies.

Continuing education benefits the WordPress community as a whole. Don’t limit that education to WordPress-specific ideas. Learn from the outside and bring it back.

Cascade

Drupal Themes - Sun, 01/05/2020 - 23:36

Basetheme using modern css-features like css-flex, css-grid and css-vars

Skin Entities

...

Subskin Entities

...

Cascade

Drupal Themes - Sun, 01/05/2020 - 23:36

Basetheme using modern css-features like css-flex, css-grid and css-vars

Skin Entities

...

Subskin Entities

...

Cascade

Drupal Themes - Sun, 01/05/2020 - 23:36

Basetheme using modern css-features like css-flex, css-grid and css-vars

Skin Entities

...

Subskin Entities

...

Fitness

Drupal Themes - Sun, 01/05/2020 - 08:14

FItness DS is a responsive Drupal 8 theme for Gym related websites.

Features

  • Drupal 8.7 core
  • Multiple Pages
  • Blogs Page with comment section

Live Demo

Get Demo Site


Downloaded Demo Site Credentials

Username: admin
password: admin@ds


Credits

Drupal theme by DrupalSlave

Fitness

Drupal Themes - Sun, 01/05/2020 - 08:14

FItness DS is a responsive Drupal 8 theme for Gym related websites.

Features

  • Drupal 8.7 core
  • Multiple Pages
  • Blogs Page with comment section

Live Demo

Get Demo Site


Downloaded Demo Site Credentials

Username: admin
password: admin@ds


Credits

Drupal theme by DrupalSlave

BuddyPress: BuddyPress 5.1.2 Security Release

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 01/03/2020 - 21:36

BuddyPress 5.1.2 is now available. This is a security release. All BuddyPress installations are strongly encouraged to upgrade as soon as possible.

The 5.1.2 release addresses one security issue:

The vulnerability was reported privately to the BuddyPress team, in accordance with WordPress’s security policies. Our thanks to the reporters for practicing coordinated disclosure.

For complete details, visit the 5.1.2 changelog.

Update to BuddyPress 5.1.2 today in your WordPress Dashboard, or by downloading from the WordPress.org plugin repository.

WPTavern: Pods Framework Loses Primary Sponsorship, Seeks Donors To Fund Project

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 01/03/2020 - 17:59

Scott Kingsley Clark, lead developer of the Pods Framework, announced the project was seeking new donors on Thursday. Automattic, the primary sponsor, dropped out after funding the project since 2012. This has put the team in a position to seek help for maintaining and supporting the project. Automattic was previously covering around 90% of the costs.

The Pods Framework is a WordPress plugin that allows end-users or developers to create and extend custom post types, content types, users, media, and comments. Essentially, it is a complete content management framework for those who need more than the basics that WordPress offers. It has well over a dozen add-on plugins for extra functionality and currently has over 80,000 active installations.

There are six primary contributors to the Pods plugin. They have also brought on a React developer who is just getting started with UI work on Pods 2.8. Other than work from the team, the project receives patches and contributions from the larger Pods community.

With the loss of funding from Automattic, Pods is receiving around $700 each month from donors. “Once we found out that Automattic was going to focus their sponsorship funding towards other priorities of theirs, we put together a plan of action to reduce overall costs,” said Clark.

The team’s goal is to have at least 200 sponsors. The average recurring monthly donation is about $17. Coupled with their current 40 regular donors, they need an additional 160 at the same donation average to cover costs. This would at least allow the team to be efficient with their time.

“Right now our feature/fix development and support efforts will begin to suffer from lack of funding because we’ll be spread too thin,” said Clark. “I work a full-time job and can’t pick up the extra weight entirely on my own.” Clark’s job with Modern Tribe gives him some flexibility to work on the project, but it is minimal and only when time is available.

People who are willing to sponsor the project monthly can contribute via the Friends of Pods sponsorship page. The project also has a one-time donation option for those wanting to go that route.

Automattic Was Crucial to Success

In his announcement, Clark said Automattic’s decision to pull their sponsorship was because the company wanted to put their funds toward native Gutenberg projects. Pods is a project that spans beyond Gutenberg. However, it does have some Gutenberg integration and more features in the works.

Since 2012, Automattic has been the largest sponsor of Pods. Their funding allowed the team to support and continue developing the plugin. “We’re so appreciative of Automattic’s support,” said Clark on Twitter. “They’ve sponsored Pods for over 7 years, I know their decision was a tough one for them.”

In 2011, Pods surpassed its goal in a Kickstarter campaign. The project raised over $4,000 with a goal of $1,500. The campaign was intended to fund the development of Pods 2.0. In hindsight, the dollar amount was far too low to realistically fund such a complex project.

“I naively thought that would be enough to accomplish everything and more we wanted to do for our big Pods 2.0 release,” said Clark. “I was really wrong. Adding developers at a late stage in a project can take even more time than you anticipate. I also had to work around those developers’ schedules and spend time coordinating with them instead of building things myself. It was a huge challenge as I hadn’t really led a team on a side project while having a full-time job before.”

Clark had to reach into his pocket and put money towards the funding problem. Yet, the team hit more roadblocks getting Pods 2.0 released. “That’s when I reached out to Automattic, which they offered to help out here and there to sponsor some more development”, he said. “I was at the right job and had the right developers in place to really make the most of that arrangement. I had tons of time on the clock at work to build projects with Pods and I could build features/fix problems every day. With the added help of the funding, we were covered for many years to come.”

The arrangement was a blessing for the project, propelling it forward for years. “Without Automattic, we surely couldn’t have continued on with the huge undertaking that the Pods 2.0 rewrite was,” said Clark. “We would have just shelved everything and only added minor fixes/enhancements to Pods going forward.”

Clark described the funding as crucial to maintaining a premium product for free. “Given what I know about many other free products out there, I can see why our support for Pods itself has sometimes been compared to premium support because of the people we could keep involved helping everyone with their project challenges and Pods questions,” he said.

After success with Pods 2.0 and several releases, the Pods team reached back out to Automattic. They were able to secure more funding with the agreement that they would diversify their funding and bring in more sponsors, which they were able to accomplish.

What the Future Holds

Clark is hopeful that they can meet their sponsorship goals. If not, they may have to explore some commercial options. However, he said Pods and its primary features will remain free of charge.

“Development is not cheap,” said Clark. “In fact, we’ve thought about diversifying our funding for a while, but ironically our sponsorship agreement with Automattic prohibited us from exploring premium add-ons to help fund more growth.”

While the funding was a blessing, it may have also been a crutch. “If we had suddenly gotten millions of active installs to support, we would have been in big trouble,” he said. “You can’t scale sponsorships with a growing userbase.”

Clark said he is committed to making sure the next three major feature releases go out for free as part of the main Pods plugin, regardless of the funding situation. “I believe in making it easy to build projects in WordPress and some of those features are just really crucial to normal projects,” he said.

The team is exploring the potential for premium add-ons. However, if going that route, the add-ons would be with useful features that go beyond the core needs of the plugin. “We have some really awesome features that we’ve always wanted to do and this could be the avenue to build them while giving huge value to our Friends of Pods,” he said. “This could be an added benefit to them for supporting our project, which they’d get as a reward for keeping their Friends of Pods membership active.”

The future is uncertain. The project is not in danger of disappearing at this point. However, the reality is that development and support have real-world costs that need to be met.

“It’s still too early to know exactly what we can do with the funding we have and what we can expect to get from our 2020 fundraising efforts,” said Clark. “We don’t know if those ongoing funding struggles will prevent us from spending time to build new add-ons to generate new revenue either. It’s all up in the air right now.”

The Month in WordPress: December 2019

Wordpress News - Fri, 01/03/2020 - 17:05

As 2019 draws to a close and we look ahead to another exciting year let’s take a moment to review what the WordPress community achieved in December.

WordPress 5.3.1 and 5.3.2 Releases

The WordPress 5.3.1 security and maintenance release was announced on December 13. It features 46 fixes and enhancements. This version corrects four security issues in WordPress versions 5.3 and earlier. Shortly afterwards, WordPress 5.3.2 was released, addressing a couple high severity Trac tickets, and includes 5 fixes and enhancements, so you’ll want to upgrade. You can read more about these releases in the announcements for 5.3.1 and 5.3.2.

Update on the Nine Core Projects for 2019

At the end of 2018, @matt announced the nine projects that would be the main focus areas for Core development in the next year. Have we made progress? Yes! @chanthaboune posted a full update on the team’s work. In brief, two of the projects have been completed and shipped in major releases, four are targeted for release in versions 5.4 and 5.5 of WordPress, and the remaining three have seen significant progress but are not yet slated for completion. These will continue to see progress throughout 2020.

Want to get involved in building WordPress Core? Follow the Core team blog and join the #core channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

WordPress Major Release Calendar

The Core team has published a tentative release calendar for 2020 and 2021. This is intended to provide the community with more information about what lies ahead.

The schedule is considered tentative because there are always variables that could affect these plans — not least that the Core team may need more time to finish the work planned for a release.

Initial Documentation for Block-Based WordPress Themes

The Gutenberg team has started working on the initial documentation for what block-based themes might look like, marking a significant change in the way themes are conceptualized. With full-site editing now a realistic goal for WordPress, themes will certainly look different in the future.

Want to help shape the future of block-based themes in WordPress Core? Following the Core team blog is a good start! You can also join in on the discussion on this blog post, or help out with the work to create a demo space for experimentation with the future of themes. As always, contribution to Gutenberg on GitHub is open to everyone! Join the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress Slack group to see what other people are saying, and contribute your own thoughts.

Gutenberg Updates Abound

It’s been a busy month for Gutenberg! Version 7.0, including a new navigation block, was announced on November 27. This was followed by version 7.1, announced on December 11; it includes 161 merged pull requests that offer a fresh UI to new users, an option to switch between edit and navigation modes, captions for the table block, and many other enhancements.

Want to get involved in building Gutenberg? Follow the Core team blog, contribute to Gutenberg on GitHub, and join the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

Arrival of the BuddyPress Beta Tester Plugin

On December 2, the BuddyPress Beta Tester plugin was added to the WordPress.org plugins directory. This feature is a great way for the WordPress community to provide early feedback on releases.

You can download the plugin now. If you find that something is not working as expected during your beta tests, let the BuddyPress team know by submitting a ticket on the Development Tracker or posting a new topic in the BuddyPress support forums.​​

An Update on the Block Directory in the WordPress Editor 

The Design team received lots of excellent feedback on the early concepts for the Block Directory. This feedback was incorporated into a Version 1 update to the #block-directory project. The Block Directory is to be included in WordPress 5.5, which is slated for August 2020. To learn more about the Block Directory, check out this announcement post and help out by sharing your feedback. 

Want to get involved in building the Block Directory? Follow the Design team blog. If you have a block you’d like to include in the directory you can submit it following the information here

Further Reading:

Have a story that we should include in the next “Month in WordPress” post? Please submit it here.

The Month in WordPress: December 2019

Wordpress News - Fri, 01/03/2020 - 17:05

As 2019 draws to a close and we look ahead to another exciting year let’s take a moment to review what the WordPress community achieved in December.

WordPress 5.3.1 and 5.3.2 Releases

The WordPress 5.3.1 security and maintenance release was announced on December 13. It features 46 fixes and enhancements. This version corrects four security issues in WordPress versions 5.3 and earlier. Shortly afterwards, WordPress 5.3.2 was released, addressing a couple high severity Trac tickets, and includes 5 fixes and enhancements, so you’ll want to upgrade. You can read more about these releases in the announcements for 5.3.1 and 5.3.2.

Update on the Nine Core Projects for 2019

At the end of 2018, @matt announced the nine projects that would be the main focus areas for Core development in the next year. Have we made progress? Yes! @chanthaboune posted a full update on the team’s work. In brief, two of the projects have been completed and shipped in major releases, four are targeted for release in versions 5.4 and 5.5 of WordPress, and the remaining three have seen significant progress but are not yet slated for completion. These will continue to see progress throughout 2020.

Want to get involved in building WordPress Core? Follow the Core team blog and join the #core channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

WordPress Major Release Calendar

The Core team has published a tentative release calendar for 2020 and 2021. This is intended to provide the community with more information about what lies ahead.

The schedule is considered tentative because there are always variables that could affect these plans — not least that the Core team may need more time to finish the work planned for a release.

Initial Documentation for Block-Based WordPress Themes

The Gutenberg team has started working on the initial documentation for what block-based themes might look like, marking a significant change in the way themes are conceptualized. With full-site editing now a realistic goal for WordPress, themes will certainly look different in the future.

Want to help shape the future of block-based themes in WordPress Core? Following the Core team blog is a good start! You can also join in on the discussion on this blog post, or help out with the work to create a demo space for experimentation with the future of themes. As always, contribution to Gutenberg on GitHub is open to everyone! Join the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress Slack group to see what other people are saying, and contribute your own thoughts.

Gutenberg Updates Abound

It’s been a busy month for Gutenberg! Version 7.0, including a new navigation block, was announced on November 27. This was followed by version 7.1, announced on December 11; it includes 161 merged pull requests that offer a fresh UI to new users, an option to switch between edit and navigation modes, captions for the table block, and many other enhancements.

Want to get involved in building Gutenberg? Follow the Core team blog, contribute to Gutenberg on GitHub, and join the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

Arrival of the BuddyPress Beta Tester Plugin

On December 2, the BuddyPress Beta Tester plugin was added to the WordPress.org plugins directory. This feature is a great way for the WordPress community to provide early feedback on releases.

You can download the plugin now. If you find that something is not working as expected during your beta tests, let the BuddyPress team know by submitting a ticket on the Development Tracker or posting a new topic in the BuddyPress support forums.​​

An Update on the Block Directory in the WordPress Editor 

The Design team received lots of excellent feedback on the early concepts for the Block Directory. This feedback was incorporated into a Version 1 update to the #block-directory project. The Block Directory is to be included in WordPress 5.5, which is slated for August 2020. To learn more about the Block Directory, check out this announcement post and help out by sharing your feedback. 

Want to get involved in building the Block Directory? Follow the Design team blog. If you have a block you’d like to include in the directory you can submit it following the information here

Further Reading:

Have a story that we should include in the next “Month in WordPress” post? Please submit it here.

WordPress.org blog: The Month in WordPress: December 2019

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 01/03/2020 - 17:05

As 2019 draws to a close and we look ahead to another exciting year let’s take a moment to review what the WordPress community achieved in December.

WordPress 5.3.1 and 5.3.2 Releases

The WordPress 5.3.1 security and maintenance release was announced on December 13. It features 46 fixes and enhancements. This version corrects four security issues in WordPress versions 5.3 and earlier. Shortly afterwards, WordPress 5.3.2 was released, addressing a couple high severity Trac tickets, and includes 5 fixes and enhancements, so you’ll want to upgrade. You can read more about these releases in the announcements for 5.3.1 and 5.3.2.

Update on the Nine Core Projects for 2019

At the end of 2018, @matt announced the nine projects that would be the main focus areas for Core development in the next year. Have we made progress? Yes! @chanthaboune posted a full update on the team’s work. In brief, two of the projects have been completed and shipped in major releases, four are targeted for release in versions 5.4 and 5.5 of WordPress, and the remaining three have seen significant progress but are not yet slated for completion. These will continue to see progress throughout 2020.

Want to get involved in building WordPress Core? Follow the Core team blog and join the #core channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

WordPress Major Release Calendar

The Core team has published a tentative release calendar for 2020 and 2021. This is intended to provide the community with more information about what lies ahead.

The schedule is considered tentative because there are always variables that could affect these plans — not least that the Core team may need more time to finish the work planned for a release.

Initial Documentation for Block-Based WordPress Themes

The Gutenberg team has started working on the initial documentation for what block-based themes might look like, marking a significant change in the way themes are conceptualized. With full-site editing now a realistic goal for WordPress, themes will certainly look different in the future.

Want to help shape the future of block-based themes in WordPress Core? Following the Core team blog is a good start! You can also join in on the discussion on this blog post, or help out with the work to create a demo space for experimentation with the future of themes. As always, contribution to Gutenberg on GitHub is open to everyone! Join the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress Slack group to see what other people are saying, and contribute your own thoughts.

Gutenberg Updates Abound

It’s been a busy month for Gutenberg! Version 7.0, including a new navigation block, was announced on November 27. This was followed by version 7.1, announced on December 11; it includes 161 merged pull requests that offer a fresh UI to new users, an option to switch between edit and navigation modes, captions for the table block, and many other enhancements.

Want to get involved in building Gutenberg? Follow the Core team blog, contribute to Gutenberg on GitHub, and join the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

Arrival of the BuddyPress Beta Tester Plugin

On December 2, the BuddyPress Beta Tester plugin was added to the WordPress.org plugins directory. This feature is a great way for the WordPress community to provide early feedback on releases.

You can download the plugin now. If you find that something is not working as expected during your beta tests, let the BuddyPress team know by submitting a ticket on the Development Tracker or posting a new topic in the BuddyPress support forums.​​

An Update on the Block Directory in the WordPress Editor 

The Design team received lots of excellent feedback on the early concepts for the Block Directory. This feedback was incorporated into a Version 1 update to the #block-directory project. The Block Directory is to be included in WordPress 5.5, which is slated for August 2020. To learn more about the Block Directory, check out this announcement post and help out by sharing your feedback. 

Want to get involved in building the Block Directory? Follow the Design team blog. If you have a block you’d like to include in the directory you can submit it following the information here

Further Reading:

Have a story that we should include in the next “Month in WordPress” post? Please submit it here.

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