Wordpress News

WPTavern: Postman SMTP Plugin Forked after Removal from WordPress.org for Security Issues

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 10/23/2017 - 16:07
photo credit: Jerry Kiesewetter

In early October the popular Postman SMTP plugin was removed from WordPress.org due to security issues. The plugin had not been updated in two years and also contained a reflected cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability that was made public in June and left unfixed. The security researcher’s attempts to contact the plugin’s author, Jason Hendriks, were unsuccessful.

The plugin is used to improve the delivery of emails that WordPress generates and it logs the causes of failed emails to help eliminate configuration mistakes. It was installed on more than 100,000 sites before it was removed from WordPress.org.

Yehuda Hassine, a WordPress developer and longtime user of the plugin, decided to fork it for the sake of its users and because he thought it was a shame to see all the the original author’s hard work go to waste.

“As a fan of the amazing work Jason has done, I was amazed no one thought of taking it over,” Hassine said. “It’s a great plugin – Jason solved so many problems dealing with SMTP setup in WordPress. He worked so hard and the idea it might disappear shocked me. The plugin worked with almost zero bugs for the past two years.”

Hassine’s fork started on GitHub with fixes for the security issue, but he said he realized not having it on WordPress.org might be a problem for some users. He submitted it under a new name, Post SMTP Mailer/Email Log, and included a patch for the security vulnerability along with fixes for a few bugs with the Gmail API, Mandrill, and SendGrid. The next item on his roadmap is to fix a few issues with PHP 7 compatibility.

Hassine also requested to adopt the original plugin, as there is no way to contact the 100,000 users who depend on it. He said the WordPress.org plugin team denied his request at this time due to the number of users and his relative unfamiliarity in the community, as well as to give the original author more time to respond.

The Post SMTP Mailer/Email Log fork has been alive for a week and already has more than 1,000 users. Hassine said he is spending his free time getting to know the SMTP protocol and Hendriks’ original code. Postman SMTP users who want to switch to the fork can keep the same settings by simply deactivating the old plugin and activating the new one.

Hassine has committed to keeping the plugin free, as many of its users are somewhat technical and able to offer each other support. He said if the fork becomes popular and more difficult to maintain, he will consider a commercial model for support.

Users of the original Postman SMTP plugin had no way of learning about the reasons behind its disappearance except on third-party sites like the Wordfence blog or Facebook posts. The WordPress.org Meta team is currently working on developing a better way to communicate why certain plugins have been closed or removed from the directory. This is a high priority ticket item for the team and a solution should be in place when the next version of the plugin directory goes live.

DrupalExp Lite

Drupal Themes - Mon, 10/23/2017 - 07:03

This theme base on Bootstrap 4 framework and support Drag & Drop layout builder.
Features:
- Build page layout visually in Theme Settings.
- Support multiple layouts.
- Build with Bootstrap 4.
- FontAwesome integrated.

WPTavern: Camp Press is Coming to Iceland April 19 – 22, 2018

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 10/20/2017 - 22:14
photo credit: Jeroen Van Nieuwenhove

The next installment of Camp Press will be held in Iceland at the Volcano Huts located in Húsadalur Valley in the Þórsmörk Nature Reserve April 19 – April 22, 2018. It will be the first time a Camp Press event will be held in Europe.

The Camp Press organization was founded to help attendees detox from digital life while spending time in nature and connecting with others in similar industries. It just wrapped up its first successful event in Oklahoma last month and the next planned event will be held in Austin, Texas on the San Marcos River, February 23-25, 2018. In a guest post on the Tavern, Brad Williams, an attendee at the inaugural event, described how the unstructured, unplugged time led to deeper connections:

As we learned more about each other, we quickly became more comfortable as a group. We shared stories, laughed, cooked, and debated topics from tech to TV shows. We discussed very personal struggles and experiences, some of which I would guess haven’t been shared outside of close family. We sang songs around the campfire, performed late-night improv, made s’mores, and enjoyed each other’s company.

Camp Press Iceland will include four days off-the-grid with the opportunity for hikes, campfires, swimming in a geothermal swimming hole, and tours of the area with minimal scheduling. Camp Press co-organizer Mendel Kurland said they chose the venue in Iceland because many people have the location on their bucket lists.

“Helping geeks detox from technology and their job is important for mental health and their ability to get things done on a daily basis,” Kurland said. “Many of us also don’t want to completely let go of talking about tech, business, or what we’re working on. This gives people a chance to disconnect with other people who understand them, while marking an item off their bucket list.”

Camp Press events are different from WordCamps in that they are for-profit events. In addition to ticket sales, the organization also accepts sponsorships on a per-event and annual basis. Pantheon, Dreamhost, and WPEngine joined as founding sponsors for the first event. Kurland said currently no money leaves the coffers to pay for the organizers’ time and all money earned is re-invested back into the concept for hosting future events.

Camp Press is also different in that it is a completely independent organization. Kurland and his co-organizers borrowed from both the WordCamp and Burning Man codes of conduct to create a code for Camp Press that minimizes commercial interests and emphasizes inclusion, self-expression, and civic responsibility.

“I’ve learned a lot from other organizers of WordCamps across the world – the struggles, the excitement, the fulfillment they enjoy,” Kurland said. “I didn’t consider the WordCamp model or foundation for this project. Independence from community politics is essential for this type of event. It’s important to have a separate objective space for connection and something that bridges between multiple communities as opposed to connected to one.”

Kurland said this type of event excels in bringing together people from different professional backgrounds and ecosystems to collaborate.

“Half are WordPress people, half aren’t,” he said. “So the opportunity to cross-pollinate and bring back awesome insights that are broader than your bubble is huge. There are a few ways this event bucks the trend. Right now we’re 60% female and 40% male for registration on the Iceland event.” The previous event hosted attendees from various professions, including graphic artists, authors, developers, and product company owners.

Kurland said the Camp Press organization plans to offer a few more domestic US event this year, along with one or two European events. They are also planning on running trips to other exotic destinations in the future. Based on the demand the organizers have seen, they anticipate a lot of interest in future events and are considering hosting interest-focused camps.

“Camp Press events will always be accessible to most and have enough activities to accommodate many interests,” Kurland said. “The next step will probably be helping companies to build out awesome experiences to gain deep insights regarding their team or client dynamics with this same type of event. We have also considered building experiences around other communities, i.e. doctors, scientists, teachers – people who need a break and have high stress jobs, but find it hard to disconnect.”

Despite not being paid for his efforts in organizing the Camp Press events, Kurland said he finds a lot of personal fulfillment in participating that keeps him wanting to organize more in the future.

“I need disconnection as much as the participants,” Kurland said. “So, for me, I get excited thinking about disconnecting and helping others shed their phone and laptop for a few days. It’s what has driven me to create these events, and I don’t see that drive dulling anytime soon.”

HeroPress: Accepting Donations

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 10/20/2017 - 12:00

Over the years people have occasionally said, “You should have a donation form; I’d like to help support HeroPress”. Recently a particularly deep conversation convinced me that allowing people to take part financially is a different, broader way for others to contribute to HeroPress.

Since HeroPress doesn’t exist without its contributors, I consulted them first and got a universal, resounding, “YES!”.

So as of today you’ll find a “Donate” button in the menu at the top of the site.

What will donations be used for?

I’m glad you asked! A variety of things.

First, I’ll have resources to sink back into the project. Hosting has been donated, but I’d like to be able to do things like pay Stacey to make banners for the older essays that don’t have them, continue to pay her to make new banners each week, and some other things similar to that.

Second, I’d like to be able to visit WordCamps on behalf of HeroPress. Donations would allow me to set aside money to travel either to camps I’ve been invited to by previous contributors or to new areas and introduce them to the project.

Lastly, it helps cover my time spent on HeroPress. This project is (and will continue to be) a labor of love, but it still eats up about 5 hours of my week that I’m not spending with my family. While the project isn’t in danger of disappearing, donations simply help share the weight of the project.

Where can I Give? Right Here

The post Accepting Donations appeared first on HeroPress.

WPTavern: From Building WordPress Sites to Selling Plugins in One Year

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 10/20/2017 - 05:08
Katie Keith

This is a guest post written by Katie Keith, co-founder of Barn2 Media. In this post, Keith shares the lessons she and her husband learned transitioning from client work to selling WordPress products in one year.

If you’ve ever dreamed of quitting client work and earning passive income by selling WordPress themes and plugins, you’re not alone. Selling products instead of providing services is the holy grail for many WordPress professionals.

This is the story of how I switched from building websites to selling plugins in just one year. Along the way, I’ve made a lot of mistakes and learned some valuable lessons. Here’s how you can make the switch too.

Seven Years Building WordPress Websites

I co-founded UK WordPress studio Barn2 Media in late 2009 with my husband Andy. We had always wanted to work for ourselves, and felt that web design was the perfect way to combine our skills. (His background is in web development; mine is project management and marketing.)

For the next seven years, we built the business by designing WordPress websites for clients, both in the UK and worldwide. We were successful and always had more work than we needed. However, from very early on, we both aspired to sell our own products instead of building websites for other people.

Our Transition Into A Plugin Business

Working with clients is great, and you get to know a lot of interesting people from different walks of life. But as a business owner, I found it frustrating to spend all of my time helping other people to build their business, with very little time to develop my own. I wanted to run a business where I could reap the rewards of my hard work. And that’s where products come in!

In the early days of the business, we tried launching a few products in our spare time, without success. In 2016, we committed to transforming Barn2 Media into a premium plugins company.

Within three months, we had launched two free plugins and a paid one. Within six months of our product focus, we were able to stop accepting new client work. Within a year, we had five premium plugins. Income from the plugin business overtook the original client business, and we haven’t looked back since.

Plugin Sales Report Lesson #1: Commit by Any Means Necessary

A lot of WordPress professionals try to develop themes or plugins as a side business, alongside their client projects. Some have found success that way, but it’s much more difficult. I tried this in 2012-13, and failed miserably.

In 2012, the WordPress themes industry was less mature and some fairly simple themes were seeing huge success. We wanted a piece of the pie, and started building a simple multipurpose theme.

The reality of day-to-day client work made it difficult to commit much time to the theme. Before we knew it, a year had passed before we were ready to submit it to ThemeForest (our chosen marketplace due to the easy route to market). By then, the themes industry had changed and was dominated by much more advanced themes that we didn’t have the resources to compete with. The market had moved on, leaving us behind.

When we started building plugins in early 2016, we learned from this mistake. Andy stopped designing websites for clients, and focused 100% on the plugins. I continued with some client projects, but dedicated 50% of my time to marketing.

It was scary to intentionally limit our income by turning down client work – especially when there are bills for pay. Fortunately, the extra commitment was worth it. We made excellent progress and got our plugins to market quickly. This made all of the difference.

If you want to build a successful theme or plugins business, commit as much time as possible to it – even if it means a short-term drop in income. You may still need to do some client work to pay the bills, but do the absolute minimum and don’t be afraid to say No. This will make you much likelier to succeed.

Lesson #2 – Go Niche, and Avoid Marketplace Fees

When we were developing a theme, we planned to sell it on ThemeForest because we’d struggle to achieve the same level of exposure ourselves. We knew we’d have to give away a huge percentage of our income in commission, but figured that it’s better to have a 50% of something than 100% of nothing.

Since then, I’ve learned that you can have your cake and eat it too. The trick is to create niche products where you have a reasonable chance of getting the exposure you need.

To illustrate this point, let’s look at our first plugin – WooCommerce Password Protected Categories. It solves a very specific problem, and is about as niche as you can get! We could have sold it on a marketplace such as CodeCanyon, who would have priced it at about $25. After commission, we’d have received $12.50-$17.50 per sale.

Instead, we decided to sell the plugin directly on our own website. After researching the cost of similar plugins, we set the price at $75.

With those costs, it would only be worth using a marketplace if it would get 500% more sales. However, ‘WooCommerce password protected categories’ is a very niche keyword and quickly reached number one in Google.

This put it directly in front of people who were looking for this solution. When I compare our sales figures with other plugins on CodeCanyon, I’m confident that we’ve had just as many sales from selling direct – with much higher revenue and profit margin.

If you’re switching to plugin sales and don’t have a huge marketing budget, do your research and create niche plugins to meet a specific need. The WordPress market is so huge that there are plenty of people looking for solutions – even very niche ones.

Lesson #3 – Get Ideas From Your Clients

As a client-facing WordPress company, you’re in a unique position to know what your clients want. When a client requests a new feature for their website, you probably research suitable plugins. If you’ve ever failed to find a suitable plugin, you’ve found a potential gap in the market!

This is how we ended up with our bestselling plugin. A client wanted a table listing all of their blog posts. We didn’t find any WordPress table plugins that could do this dynamically, so we developed a bespoke plugin for the client. Later, we released an enhanced version to the WordPress plugin repository.

After launching the free table plugin, we immediately started getting requests from users wanting to list other WordPress post types in a table. We launched Posts Table Pro as a premium plugin to solve this problem.

Posts Table Pro was (and still is) quite popular, but we quickly discovered that a lot of our customers were using it to list WooCommerce products in a table. We received lots of requests for dedicated WooCommerce features such as Add to Cart buttons. In response, we developed WooCommerce Product Table which has been hugely successful.

Plugin Ideas

We never came up with the idea for a WooCommerce table plugin. It was a gradual journey that started with an unrelated request from a client.

You can do the same. Use your web design clients as a starting point for finding gaps in the market. Go with the flow and evolve new ideas wherever you see demand. If you’re flexible, you can eventually end up with a bestselling plugin!

Lesson #4 – Focus on Professionalism

However good your plugins are, they will only sell if people trust you and are confident in buying from you. This is easy if you’re a big name and have a known brand. Unfortunately, we didn’t have those luxuries!

Barn2 Media is well-known as a WordPress agency, but not as a plugin company. We had to work hard to reassure customers that we’re a professional company that they can safely buy from.

Here’s how you can do the same:

  • Ensure your overall website is professional and has the attention to detail that people will expect from your products.
  • Add extra trust factors to your website, such as badges and logos.
  • Create well designed sales pages with plenty of information such as screenshots and demo videos.
  • Show customer reviews on the sales page. To get started, add a testimonial from one of your web design clients. Once more people are using your product, you can replace it with a full reviews section.
  • Design a comprehensive demo site for your themes or plugins.
  • Use well-known payment providers.
  • Add an SSL certificate.

These details definitely make a difference. Every time we’ve taken steps to make our website more professional, we’ve seen a big jump in sales. A lot of small theme and plugin companies fall at this hurdle and their products get lost behind an unprofessional website – don’t let the same happen to you.

Lesson #5 – Don’t Let Customer Support Overwhelm You photo credit: IronRodArt – Royce Bair (“Star Shooter”)cc

One of my biggest fears in switching to plugin sales was that customer support would be just as time-consuming as supporting clients. In our first few months of selling plugins, every sale seemed to demand a large amount of support. We couldn’t imagine how we would cope with a big increase in sales.

We overcame this by designing every part of the plugin business in a way that would reduce the need for support:

  • Build a searchable knowledge library for your documentation and FAQ’s. Make sure customers can only see the ‘Request Support’ link after searching the knowledge library.
  • Create a confirmation email with clear setup instructions and links to the knowledge base.
  • Add explanatory notes and links to the documentation to your settings pages.
  • View every support request as a learning opportunity. How can you prevent other customers from asking the same question in future?

It’s vital to provide excellent customer support, whether you do it yourself or outsource it. But there’s nothing wrong with helping customers to help themselves, so they’re unlikely to contact you in the first place. This lets us provide better support, build direct relationships with our customers, and constantly improve our plugins and documentation to reduce the need for support even further.

We originally thought that we’d have to outsource plugin support. In the end, we managed to scale the plugin business to 200+ sales per month while still only spending an hour or two a day on support.

Lesson #6 – Your Old Clients Are A Safety Net, Not A Burden

If you’ve been designing websites for a while, then you probably have quite a few existing clients under your belt. It’s easy to see them as a distraction when you’re trying to focus on new goals. Instead, view them as an extra income stream that will provide financial security through your leap into the unknown.

We host and maintain over 70 websites that we previously developed. We stopped taking on new clients over a year ago, but still take care of our original clients. This doesn’t take much of our time because the hosting and maintenance arrangements are already in place, and it’s easy to make small changes to websites we built ourselves.

These websites were a lot of work to develop, but now provide a vital stream of passive income. This allowed us to stop taking on new clients more quickly while the income from the plugin business played catch-up. It’s also a safety net in case the plugin industry takes a downturn in the future.

Putting It Into Practice

After dreaming about it for so many years, I’m so proud that we finally made the transition from designing websites to selling plugins. It wasn’t easy, but when we fully committed to switching to plugins, everything came together and we haven’t looked back.

When you’re focused on client projects, it’s hard to rise above the day-to-day grind and prioritize product development. Many people have written about the difficulties of starting a theme or plugin business, given the amount of competition and the maturity of the market. By following the lessons in this article, I believe that you can create a space for yourself and find the success you deserve.

Visually Impaired Support (theme)

Drupal Themes - Thu, 10/19/2017 - 06:57

Theme provides version for visually impaired people according to Russian legislation

WordPress 4.9 Beta 3

Wordpress News - Thu, 10/19/2017 - 05:18

WordPress 4.9 Beta 3 is now available!

This software is still in development, so we don’t recommend you run it on a production site. Consider setting up a test site just to play with the new version. To test WordPress 4.9, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can download the beta here (zip).

For more information on what’s new in 4.9, check out the Beta 1 blog post. Since the Beta 1 release, we’ve made 70 changes in Beta 2 and 92 changes in Beta 3. A few of these newest changes to take note of in particular:

  • The plugin/theme editors now show files in a scrollable expandable tree list. See #24048.
  • Backwards compatibility has been improved for MediaElement.js, which is upgraded from 2.2 to 4.2. See #42189.
  • When you create post stubs in the Customizer (such as for nav menu items, for the homepage or the posts page), if you then schedule your customized changes or save them as a draft, then these Customizer-created posts will appear in the admin as “Customization Drafts”; these drafts can be edited before your customized changes are published, at which time these posts (or pages) will also be automatically published. See #42220.
  • Theme browsing and installation experience in the Customizer has seen some bugfixes (e.g. #42215 and #42212), with some known remaining issues outstanding in Safari.
  • There is now a callout on the dashboard to install and activate Gutenberg. See #41316.
  • Menus in the Customizer have seen additional usability improvements. See #36279 and #42114.

Do you speak a language other than English? Help us translate WordPress into more than 100 languages!

If you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. We’d love to hear from you! If you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, file one on WordPress Trac, where you can also find a list of known bugs.

Many refinements
Exist within this release;
Can you find them all?

Dev Blog: WordPress 4.9 Beta 3

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 10/19/2017 - 05:18

WordPress 4.9 Beta 3 is now available!

This software is still in development, so we don’t recommend you run it on a production site. Consider setting up a test site just to play with the new version. To test WordPress 4.9, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can download the beta here (zip).

For more information on what’s new in 4.9, check out the Beta 1 blog post. Since the Beta 1 release, we’ve made 70 changes in Beta 2 and 92 changes in Beta 3. A few of these newest changes to take note of in particular:

  • The plugin/theme editors now show files in a scrollable expandable tree list. See #24048.
  • Backwards compatibility has been improved for MediaElement.js, which is upgraded from 2.2 to 4.2. See #42189.
  • When you create post stubs in the Customizer (such as for nav menu items, for the homepage or the posts page), if you then schedule your customized changes or save them as a draft, then these Customizer-created posts will appear in the admin as “Customization Drafts”; these drafts can be edited before your customized changes are published, at which time these posts (or pages) will also be automatically published. See #42220.
  • Theme browsing and installation experience in the Customizer has seen some bugfixes (e.g. #42215 and #42212), with some known remaining issues outstanding in Safari.
  • There is now a callout on the dashboard to install and activate Gutenberg. See #41316.
  • Menus in the Customizer have seen additional usability improvements. See #36279 and #42114.

Do you speak a language other than English? Help us translate WordPress into more than 100 languages!

If you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. We’d love to hear from you! If you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, file one on WordPress Trac, where you can also find a list of known bugs.

Many refinements
Exist within this release;
Can you find them all?

WPTavern: Google Chrome v62 Adds Support for OpenType Variable Fonts, Expands HTTP Warnings

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 10/19/2017 - 04:51

Google Chrome version 62 was pushed to the stable channel for Windows, Mac, and Linux today and will be rolling out to users over the next few days. The browser is continuing to put the pressure on website owners to migrate to HTTPS. As expected from the roadmap laid out earlier this year, a “Not Secure” warning is now displayed when visitors land on an HTTP page that includes a form, as well as on all HTTP pages in Incognito mode.

Previously, Chrome displayed the warning if it detected any forms on the page that transmit data such as passwords or credit card information. Version 62 shows the warning on all HTTP pages that include forms of any kind. This is another gradual step on the road to eventually showing the “Not secure” warning for all HTTP pages.

Chrome 62 also introduces support for OpenType Variable Fonts, a new technology that combines multiple font files into one compact file, delivering all variations of that font, including stretch, style, and weight. Developers can use the updated CSS properties to customize the font display and specify variations in its axis parameters using numeric values.

Animated Amstelvar and Decovar variable font examples – Image credit: Chromium blog

OpenType Variable Fonts is a collaborative effort led by Microsoft that includes contribution from teams at Adobe, Apple, Google, and input from independent font and tool makers. Microsoft is calling it “the biggest enhancement to OpenType since the OpenType specification was first released nineteen years ago.” The company’s announcement, published in 2016, describes a few of the most important advantages of OpenType Variable Fonts:

OpenType Font Variations enables web site designers and application developers to deliver typographically rich experiences while using very little network bandwidth and small font files. Variable fonts will also give document creators a broad palette of typographic features without having to manage hundreds of font files. Variable fonts are all about doing more with less.

Last year, after OpenType Font Variations were added to version 1.8 of the OpenType font format specification, Tiro Typeworks co-founder John Hudson wrote an excellent article explaining how variable fonts work and their potential impact on typography in the future:

The potential for dynamic selection of custom instances within the variations design space — or design-variations space, to use its technical name — opens exciting prospects for fine tuning the typographic palette, and for new kinds of responsive typography that can adapt to best present dynamic content to a reader’s device, screen orientation, or even reading distance.

Variable fonts are currently in development for Microsoft Edge and the team is also working on a formal proposal to add support to CSS.

Just submitted the PR, should be live on the status site soon. Variable fonts are in development in @MSEdgeDev

— Greg Whitworth (@gregwhitworth) September 30, 2017

Chrome adding support for OpenType Font Variations puts the technology one step closer to becoming more widely adopted, which should improve performance for sites across the web. Google is also working on bringing variable fonts to the Noto fonts project, Google Fonts, and other products.

WPTavern: GoDaddy Launches New Managed WordPress Hosting Platform Aimed at Professionals

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 10/18/2017 - 21:57

GoDaddy has expanded its managed WordPress hosting plans to include a new “Pro WordPress” platform with tools aimed at professionals who are hosting multiple sites. Although GoDaddy currently has 4 million customers running on WordPress, its more basic plans were not adequate for those who require additional tools to manage multiple sites and clients in one place.

“Our new Managed WordPress platform is for WordPress professionals, which we’ve struggled to serve well in the past,” GoDaddy’s Head of WordPress, Gabriel Mays, said. “We’re fixing that.”

Pro WordPress, a product the company teased at WordCamp Europe 2017, uses PHP 7.1 as the default, Kubernetes container management, and gives each site isolated, dedicated resources. It also includes ManageWP premium tools (GoDaddy Pro Sites), 90 days of backups powered by ManageWP, staging site environment, a Gravity Forms license, a library of 10,000+ free stock images, scanning and monitoring powered by Sucuri, and free SSL automatically installed on every site.

GoDaddy’s new offering is aggressively priced at $10/month for one site and ranges to $99/month for 25 sites. Mays said that hosting millions of WordPress sites has allowed GoDaddy to gain economies of scale and pass on the savings to customers. For comparison, WP Engine’s personal plan pricing starts at $25/month for one site and $249/month for 25 sites. Flywheel’s bulk pricing starts at $92/month for 10 installs and $229/month for up to 30 sites. SiteGround is still somewhat of an outlier with unlimited installs for any of its bulk WordPress hosting plans, which begin at $5.95/month and range to $11.95/month.

“Our chief competitors are other hosts who serve Web Pros like WP Engine, SiteGround, and others,” Mays said. “We differentiate in performance, quality, and value. For example, while our competitors serve their products from a shared environment, we don’t. Our customers get a fully containerized environment with isolated resources. This delivers high performance and failover for high redundancy.”

GoDaddy’s WordPress customer base continues to outpace the growth of the market. In 2016, roughly one third of all GoDaddy sites were running on WordPress, and half of all new sites were using the software. Over the past several years, GoDaddy has been working to overcome its poor reputation in the WordPress community. During that time, the company acquired several large WordPress-related products to boost its offerings in the space, including ManageWP (September 2016), WP Curve (December 2016), and Sucuri (March 2017).

The acquisition of these products, as well as partnerships with Gravity Forms, Beaver Builder, and WP101, were all milestones in what Mays said is GoDaddy’s goal – to become “a one-stop shop for WordPress professionals.” The company continues to invest in the community by sponsoring WordCamps globally and supporting WordPress security team lead Aaron Campbell as a full-time core contributor.

“Five years ago, GoDaddy wasn’t involved in the WordPress community; we were the mammoth host that made money off of WordPress without giving back,” Mays said. “We’ve made some big strides in changing that, and will continue to ramp up our commitment to the WordPress community.”

Sketch

Drupal Themes - Tue, 10/17/2017 - 15:54

ae admin

Drupal Themes - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 09:49

ae admin is a rubik based admin theme used for campaignion.

WPTavern: Bear App Users Want WordPress Publishing Integration

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 22:17

Ever since the demise of WordPress’ old distraction-free writing mode, users have been forced to look elsewhere for a truly zen writing experience. Gutenberg’s current design trajectory doesn’t seem to be putting it on track for delivering the minimalist writing environment that many writers crave. The project has a lot of publishing and design-related functionality to account for in its UI, but I am hopeful that the plugin ecosystem will offer extensions that pare Gutenberg back to just the essentials for writing.

In the meantime, those in search of a minimalist writing experience have found it in dedicated writing apps like iA Writer, Ulysses, WriteRoom, OmmWriter, and others. The Bear app, a newcomer launched in 2016, is a rising favorite that works on iPhone, iPad, and Mac. Although somewhat better known as a note-taking app, Bear’s beautiful writing experience won the app a 2017 Apple Design Award.

Bear blends the best features of a note-taking app with a writing app. Users can turn on Focus Mode using the bottom right icon, which hides the sidebar and note list to provide a more minimal writing space. Bear saves users’ writing in real-time, offers in-line support for images, and syntax highlighting for 20+ programming languages. There are no distractions while the user is composing, as the editor instantly displays rich previews. It’s easy to see why Bear has become an instant favorite.

Many Bear users still have the need to publish their writings to the web, a capability that the app doesn’t currently support. Naturally, a WordPress export or “Publish to WordPress” option is one of the most often requested features. However, Shiny Frog, the company behind the Bear app, is not yet working on publishing features.

“Medium and WordPress publishing features are on our todo list, but not on top priority right now,” Shiny Frog co-founder Danilo Bonardi said when I asked last November about the company’s plans to support a WordPress export option.

Other users have also posted to the app’s support forum and its subreddit, asking for WordPress integration:

I’m really enjoying using Bear for my writing, and the newer features are great, but I’m trying to get started with my own blog and more as I am developing my own business and being able to export to WordPress would be incredibly helpful for me going forward.

This is the one feature that would allow me to switch from Ulysses.

With Ulysses going to a (more expensive) subscription, the time seems right for Bear to offer a “publish to WordPress” feature that could match what Ulysses offers. This is about the only thing holding Bear back for me.

I’m currently deciding between Bear and Ulysses, and right now the dealbreaker is Ulysses’s ability to push to WordPress. If you were able to build that functionality, it would seal the deal!

Bonardi confirmed again, as recently as last month, that the company is still keeping a tight focus and has not yet prioritized publishing to WordPress.

“Publishing features have been asked before and we will address them sooner or later,” Bonardi said. “Our hopes are to integrate Bear with Medium/WordPress apps instead of implementing our own publishing tool with their APIs. Using their APIs is the other solution but in this scenario we have to build a specific UI for this functionality instead of relying on external apps.”

In the meantime, Bear App support staff recommends using the Markdown export option, available in the free version. Additional export options, including HTML, are available Bear’s $14.99 per year Pro version, which is much more affordable than pricey competitors like Ulysses and others that cater specifically to long-form writing.

Quadro also has an option to share Bear notes to both Medium and WordPress. However, it’s not an official Bear utility and the workflow is rather complicated to set up. Users who have tried this option didn’t find it to save time over simply copying and pasting.

WordPress Needs Its Own Beautiful Writing Experience

WordPress publishing support for Bear doesn’t seem to be a major priority for the company at this time, but splitting up the writing and publishing process is a deal breaker for many who want a simple workflow that doesn’t involve copying and pasting between apps.

Alternatively, what if WordPress could be known for its beautiful writing experience in core, without a user having to resort to plugins or third-party apps to get there? This seems like a reasonable expectation for Gutenberg, but the project has the added challenge of incorporating a lot of publishing, media, and legacy functionality into its UI in a way that is easily discoverable.

Unfortunately, this has resulted in an interface that is constantly popping into view. With the right combination of clicks and hovers, a user can end up in situation like the one shown below in the screenshot – surrounded by formatting options and icons on all sides.

Making it easy to publish to the web, which is WordPress’ forte, isn’t as compelling if users have to look elsewhere to find a truly distraction-free writing experience. Fortunately, minimalist writing apps like Bear can fill the gap until the WordPress plugin ecosystem can produce an interface where writing is a delight.

WPTavern: WordPress 4.9 Protects Users From Fatal Errors Created in the Theme and Plugin Editors

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 21:25

Over the years, there have been many discussions and debates on whether or not WordPress should have a built-in file editor for themes and plugins. The file editors, while convenient, allow users to easily trigger fatal errors that can be difficult to fix, especially if they don’t have FTP access.

Instead of removing the editors from core, the WordPress development team has enhanced them by adding fatal error protection in WordPress 4.9. When a user accesses the theme or plugin editor for the first time, they’re presented with the following warnings. The warnings are a result of a three-year-old trac ticket.

Plugin Editor Warning Theme Editor Warning

If you try to save changes to a file and WordPress detects a fatal error, the change is not saved and a warning message is displayed that explains where the error occurred. Although the changes are rolled back, the code in the editor is not replaced with the original. To replace the code, simply refresh the browser tab.

Fatal Error Detected

In addition to safety features, the code editors are powered by CodeMirror, an open-source, JavaScript powered text editor that adds features such as line numbers. The plugin editor includes the ability to look up documentation for filters, hooks, and actions with many of the links pointing to the new WordPress Developers Resource site.

Even with the addition of CodeMirror in core, the file editors in WordPress are not a replacement for an integrated development environment. However, the warnings and fatal error protection are huge improvements that will prevent many users from creating a White Screen of Death situation on their sites.

WPTavern: GitHub Launches New Dependency Graph Feature with Security Alerts Coming Soon

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 18:56

GitHub announced a new Dependency Graph feature at the Github Universe conference yesterday. It lists all the dependencies for a repository and will soon identify known vulnerabilities. The graph can be accessed under the Insights tab and currently supports Ruby and JavaScript dependencies with Python coming soon.

Public repositories display the graph by default and private repository owners also have the option to enable it. Below is a screenshot of Gutenberg’s dependency graph:

GitHub plans to extend dependency graphs to show security alerts when one of the dependencies is using a version that is publicly known to be vulnerable to a security issue. The alerts may also in some cases be able to suggest a security fix. Security alerts for dependencies is the first among a collection of security tools that GitHub has planned to release.

The dependency graph isn’t yet as useful as it could be for many PHP-based WordPress projects, but GitHub’s decision to start with support for JavaScript and Ruby dependencies is in line with the data the company collected from repositories. JavaScript and Ruby are among the top four most popular languages on GitHub, as measured by the number of pull requests. JavaScript is by far the most popular and PHP isn’t too far behind Ruby, according to stats from the State of the Octoverse 2017.

GitHub is also launching new efforts to connect its massive community. The company reported 24 million developers working across 67 million repositories in 2017. The new community features are aimed at helping developers make meaningful connections in the vast sea of repositories on the platform. Users will notice a new “Discover Repositories” feed in their dashboards that makes recommendations based on their starred repositories and the people they follow.

GitHub has also launched a new curated Explore section to help users browse open source projects, topics, events, and resources.

law/legal business

Drupal Themes - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 10:37

This is the most Powerful HTML 5 theme with a responsive, mobile-first grid design.

Features

  • Fully Responsive layout.
  • Configurable Slideshow through theme setting.
  • HTML5 & super clean markup
  • A total of 13 block regions
  • Social media integration through theme setting

Drupal compatibility:

This theme is compatible with Drupal 8.x

WordPress 4.9 Beta 2

Wordpress News - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 06:29

WordPress 4.9 Beta 2 is now available!

This software is still in development, so we don’t recommend you run it on a production site. Consider setting up a test site just to play with the new version. To test WordPress 4.9, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can download the beta here (zip).

For more information on what’s new in 4.9, check out the Beta 1 blog post. Since then, we’ve made 70 changes in Beta 2.

Do you speak a language other than English? Help us translate WordPress into more than 100 languages!

If you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. We’d love to hear from you! If you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, file one on WordPress Trac, where you can also find a list of known bugs.

Let’s test all of these:
code editing, theme switches,
widgets, scheduling.

Dev Blog: WordPress 4.9 Beta 2

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 06:29

WordPress 4.9 Beta 2 is now available!

This software is still in development, so we don’t recommend you run it on a production site. Consider setting up a test site just to play with the new version. To test WordPress 4.9, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can download the beta here (zip).

For more information on what’s new in 4.9, check out the Beta 1 blog post. Since then, we’ve made 70 changes in Beta 2.

Do you speak a language other than English? Help us translate WordPress into more than 100 languages!

If you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. We’d love to hear from you! If you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, file one on WordPress Trac, where you can also find a list of known bugs.

Let’s test all of these:
code editing, theme switches,
widgets, scheduling.

WPTavern: WordPress Replaces Browserify with Webpack for Build Process

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 10/11/2017 - 23:58

During a core JavaScript chat held in May, WordPress contributors agreed on using Webpack (and ES6 imports) instead of Browserify for JavaScript bundling in the build process.

“Since we split the media files in #28510, the core build process has used Browserify to combine the media files,” Adam Silverstein said in the ticket proposing the replacement. “While browserify has served us well, Webpack is probably a better long term choice for the project, especially with the introduction of a new JavaScript framework that may require a build.”

Over the past four months contributors on the ticket have worked on making sure the Webpack setup is working well to build the files. WordPress core committer K. Adam White also reached out to some Webpack contributors for an additional review during the process before replacing Browserify as the JavaScript bundler.

Webpack has rapidly gained popularity among the many utilities for bundling JavaScript files and is one of the most prominent examples of a project that has successfully found a sustainable source of funding through its account on Open Collective. The project funded its first full-time developer through the platform and has an estimated annual budget of $241,650, based on current donations.

WPTavern: WPWeekly Episode 291 – All Hands on Deck on The Ship of Theseus

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 10/11/2017 - 23:10

In this episode, John James Jacoby and I discuss the news of the week including DonateWC sponsoring its first recipient to WordCamp Cape Town, WordPress 4.9 Beta 1, and WooCommerce 3.2. We also have a bit of fun with Poopy.life and blurt out a few crappy puns. Last but not least, we dissect Matías Ventura’s vision of Gutenberg.

Stories Discussed:

WordPress 4.9 Beta 1 Released
WooCommerce 3.2 Released
WooConf 2017 Livestream Tickets Now on Sale
Gutenberg Engineer Matías Ventura Unpacks the Vision for Gutenblocks, Front-End Editing, and the Future of WordPress Themes
Poopy.life Launches Pro Version at WPsandbox.io Aimed at Theme and Plugin Developers
Disqus Data Breach Affects 17.5 Million Accounts
We’re sending a speaker to WordCamp Cape Town
GitLab Raises $20 Million Series C Round, Adds Matt Mullenweg to Board of Directors

WPWeekly Meta:

Next Episode: Wednesday, October 18th 3:00 P.M. Eastern

Subscribe To WPWeekly Via Itunes: Click here to subscribe

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Listen To Episode #291:

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