Wordpress News

WordPress.org blog: The Month in WordPress: February 2019

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 03/01/2019 - 10:00

A new version of WordPress, significant security enhancements, important discussions, and much more – read on to find out what has been going on in the WordPress community for the month of February.

Release of WordPress 5.1

Near the end of the month, WordPress 5.1 was released, featuring significant stability and performance enhancements as well as the first of the Site Health mechanisms that are in active development. Most prominent is the new warning for sites running long-outdated versions of PHP.

You can check out the Field Guide for this release for a detailed look at all the new features and improvements. The next release is already in development with plans to improve the Site Health features, PHP compatibility, and a number of other things.

Want to get involved in testing or building WordPress Core? You can install the WordPress Beta Tester plugin, follow the Core team blog, and join the #core channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

Gutenberg Development Continues

The block editor that is now a part of WordPress core started out as a project named Gutenberg with the lofty goal of creating a whole new site-building experience for all WordPress users. The first phase of Gutenberg resulted in the block editor that was included in WordPress 5.0, but development didn’t stop there – phase 2 of the project is well underway.

This month, one of the initial goals for this phase was reached with all of the core WordPress widgets being converted to blocks – this will go a long way to allowing full sites to be built using blocks, rather than simply post or page content.

Want to get involved in developing Gutenberg? Check out the GitHub repository and join the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

Block Editor Comes to the Mobile Apps

As Gutenberg development continues, the Mobile team has been working hard to integrate the new block editor into the WordPress mobile apps. Near the end of February, the team shipped a complete integration in the beta versions of the apps – this a significant milestone and a big step towards unifying the mobile and desktop editing experiences.

Both the iOS and Android apps are open for beta testers, so if you would like to experience the block editor on mobile today, then join the beta program.

Want to get involved in developing the WordPress mobile apps? Follow the Mobile team blog, and join the #mobile channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

WordPress Triage Team Announced

One of the goals for 2019 that Matt Mullenweg (@matt) announced in his State of the Word address last year was to form a team who would work to manage the ever-increasing number of tickets in Trac, the bug tracker that WordPress Core employs.

This team, known as the Triage Team, has been announced. Their work will involve coordinating with component maintainers, release leads, project leadership, contributors, and other WordPress related projects with issue trackers outside of Trac to ensure that everyone is empowered to focus on contributing.

The team was formed based on nominations of volunteers to take part and will be led by Jonathan Desrosiers (@desrosj). The other members of the team are Chris Christoff (@chriscct7), Tammie Lister (@karmatosed), Sergey Biryukov (@sergey), and Sheri Bigelow (@designsimply) – all of whom have a strong track record of contributing to WordPress, have exhibited good triaging practices, and are overall good community members.

Further Reading:

Have a story that we should include in the next “Month in WordPress” post? Please submit it here.

The Month in WordPress: February 2019

Wordpress News - Fri, 03/01/2019 - 10:00

A new version of WordPress, significant security enhancements, important discussions, and much more – read on to find out what has been going on in the WordPress community for the month of February.

Release of WordPress 5.1

Near the end of the month, WordPress 5.1 was released, featuring significant stability and performance enhancements as well as the first of the Site Health mechanisms that are in active development. Most prominent is the new warning for sites running long-outdated versions of PHP.

You can check out the Field Guide for this release for a detailed look at all the new features and improvements. The next release is already in development with plans to improve the Site Health features, PHP compatibility, and a number of other things.

Want to get involved in testing or building WordPress Core? You can install the WordPress Beta Tester plugin, follow the Core team blog, and join the #core channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

Gutenberg Development Continues

The block editor that is now a part of WordPress core started out as a project named Gutenberg with the lofty goal of creating a whole new site-building experience for all WordPress users. The first phase of Gutenberg resulted in the block editor that was included in WordPress 5.0, but development didn’t stop there – phase 2 of the project is well underway.

This month, one of the initial goals for this phase was reached with all of the core WordPress widgets being converted to blocks – this will go a long way to allowing full sites to be built using blocks, rather than simply post or page content.

Want to get involved in developing Gutenberg? Check out the GitHub repository and join the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

Block Editor Comes to the Mobile Apps

As Gutenberg development continues, the Mobile team has been working hard to integrate the new block editor into the WordPress mobile apps. Near the end of February, the team shipped a complete integration in the beta versions of the apps – this a significant milestone and a big step towards unifying the mobile and desktop editing experiences.

Both the iOS and Android apps are open for beta testers, so if you would like to experience the block editor on mobile today, then join the beta program.

Want to get involved in developing the WordPress mobile apps? Follow the Mobile team blog, and join the #mobile channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

WordPress Triage Team Announced

One of the goals for 2019 that Matt Mullenweg (@matt) announced in his State of the Word address last year was to form a team who would work to manage the ever-increasing number of tickets in Trac, the bug tracker that WordPress Core employs.

This team, known as the Triage Team, has been announced. Their work will involve coordinating with component maintainers, release leads, project leadership, contributors, and other WordPress related projects with issue trackers outside of Trac to ensure that everyone is empowered to focus on contributing.

The team was formed based on nominations of volunteers to take part and will be led by Jonathan Desrosiers (@desrosj). The other members of the team are Chris Christoff (@chriscct7), Tammie Lister (@karmatosed), Sergey Biryukov (@sergey), and Sheri Bigelow (@designsimply) – all of whom have a strong track record of contributing to WordPress, have exhibited good triaging practices, and are overall good community members.

Further Reading:

Have a story that we should include in the next “Month in WordPress” post? Please submit it here.

Flexi Pattern Lab

Drupal Themes - Fri, 03/01/2019 - 06:57

This is simple Drupal 8 theme with Pattern Lab conveniently integrated.
The theme relies on Bootstrap 4 as the underlining front-end framework.
Composer is used to manage the Twig Standard Edition of Pattern Lab.
Node is used for the theme's asset compiling, as well as managing pattern generation.

Installation
=======

  • Download and place in the /themes/ directory.
  • Download the components and twig tweak module, place in the /modules/ directory and enable the module
  • Install npm in the /themes/ themes floder/ directory

Features
========

  • Bootstrap 4
  • Pattern Lab components

Supported modules
=============

WPTavern: WordPress Designers Seek Feedback on Navigation Menu Block Prototype

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 03/01/2019 - 04:55

Creating a block for navigation menus is one of the nine projects Matt Mullenweg identified as a priority for 2019, and the future of WordPress menus is starting to take shape. Designers working on the new Navigation Menu block have published a prototype this week with detailed notes on how users will interact with the block.

The proposed solution would automatically generate a menu and users would able to delete menu items using the keyboard or block settings ellipsis menu. Individual menu items can be moved right or left and more advanced options for reordering or nesting would be hidden behind the block inspector.

Adding a menu item opens a search bar that would give quick access to all the content in the site. From here users can create a new page or use advanced mode to bulk add more pages. The designs aim to hide most of the more complex tasks behind the block inspector.

Reading through the list of interactions this design is expected to cover, it’s clear that navigation menus are one of the most challenging interfaces to bring into the block editor. One of the principles the designs are based on is that “The editing state of the block itself should mimic as closely as possible the front-end output.” However, it’s difficult to fully visualize how this will work. Navigation menus are most likely to be used in the header and/or footer of a website, but it’s not yet clear how themes will reveal a navigation area to Gutenberg.

There are still many questions to be answered and the design team is seeking feedback on the prototype. Comments are open on the post and feedback on more specific interactions can be left on the relevant GitHub tickets or in Figma. The tickets related to the navigation block discussion are listed in the proposal. The design team is currently working on usability testing and aims to have a final design by the end of March.

WPTavern: WPWeekly Episode 347 – Chair Buying, Pressing Issues, and Block Management

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 02/28/2019 - 22:10

In this episode, John James Jacoby and I start off by discussing the office chair purchasing process. I recently needed to buy a new chair and was surprised by some of the features that were highlighted.

We talked about block managers and some of the pitfalls that will need to be overcome. For example, what should WordPress do if a user disables a block that’s already used in a post?

We wrap up the show by sharing some of the most pressing issues people are having with WordPress.

Stories Discussed:

Yoast CEO Responds to #YoastCon Twitter Controversy, Calls for Change in the SEO Industry

WordPress 5.1 Improves Editor Performance, Encourages Users to Update Outdated PHP Versions

Block Management Features Proposed for WordPress 5.2

5.2 Proposed Scope and Release Schedule

UI/UX Changes for the Site Health Check Plugin

Jeffrey Zeldman Promoted to Automattic Employee

The Most Pressing Issues People Have with WordPress These Days

WPWeekly Meta:

Next Episode: Wednesday, March 6th 3:00 P.M. Eastern

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Listen To Episode #347:

WPTavern: WordPress Contributors Propose Shorter, Time-based Release Cycles

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 02/28/2019 - 18:21

WordPress release cycles may soon take a more predictable cadence, as contributors are considering moving to a time-based approach. The discussion began during a recent core dev chat in mid-February when Gutenberg phase 2 lead Riad Benguella proposed the project move to shorter, automated release cycles.

The Gutenberg team has successfully been releasing a new version of the plugin every two weeks on schedule and any features that aren’t ready are postponed to the next releases automatically. Benguella contends that this type of release schedule has the potential to bring several benefits to WordPress:

  • Less stress for contributors
  • Predictability: People can plan around the release timelines easily
  • No delays as releases are not feature-based

Shortening major releases may prove more challenging for WordPress, which is at a much larger scale than the Gutenberg plugin. The plugin also has the added advantage of being able to manage releases and development on GitHub.

“I think there are a lot of infrastructure problems that need to be solved for WordPress before we could move to a fast, automated release cycle,” Gary Pendergast said.

“Having a major release once a month is achievable, it’s something I’d like us to get to, but the release process is too manual to have multiple releases running at the same time at the moment.”

Jonathan Desrosiers drafted a proposal that summarizes this discussion and outlines some of the manual tasks required for getting a major release out the door. These include time-consuming tasks like Trac gardening, creating a Field Guide, blog posts for the betas, RCs, and official release, documentation updates, videos, dev notes, and other items that are often completed by volunteers.

The 3-4 month release cycles that WordPress had from versions 3.9 – 4.7 allowed for all of the administrative overhead outlined above to be completed in a reasonable amount of time, but the general consensus is that some of these tasks could be more simplified and/or automated.

Desrosiers highlighted several benefits of moving to a shorter major release cycle, including less drastic change for users that might ultimately result in more users being comfortable enabling automatic updates for major releases. Detriments to shortening the release cycle are the increased burden it puts on volunteers as well as theme and plugin developers who need to push compatibility releases. It would also introduce more backporting work for security releases.

Several contributors have left feedback on the post with insight gleaned from other projects’ release scheduling. Jeremy Felt reviewed Firefox’s release owner table that assigns leadership and dates for several releases in advance.

“I think getting to a shorter release cycle in general will involve scheduling multiple releases and assigning their release leads in advance,” Felt said. “So far most of our scheduling is done as soon as the last release has been shipped.”

Joe McGill examined VS Code’s development process and found several similarities to the process he thinks WordPress could adopt in the future:

  1. A long term roadmap (theirs is 6–12 months) outlining major themes and features.
  2. A monthly release cadence based on 4 week sprints which begin with milestone planning and always results in a release of whatever was completed in that monthly iteration.
  3. Regular project triage, with release priorities managed at the team (i.e. Component) level.
  4. Documentation integrated into the development process.
  5. Automated testing of releases and upgrades.
  6. Only important regressions and security issues are handled in minor releases between monthly milestones, everything else is moved forward to the next release (or reprioritized in the backlog).

Several of these points echo feedback from other contributors who have identified documentation integrated into development and automated testing as ways to speed up major release cycles.

“If we don’t have the infrastructure and tooling to support a 1 month cycle, then I think we could attempt a 2 month cycle with a goal towards moving to shorter cycles,” McGill said.

The Gutenberg plugin’s relentless pace of iteration and predictable release cycles have opened up a world of new ideas for improving the process for WordPress core. Discussion around moving the project to shorter, time-based release cycles is still in the preliminary stages. No major changes have been agreed upon yet, but the process of exploring different ideas has put the spotlight on tasks that could afford to be tightened up in the release process. This falls in line with WordPress’ 2019 theme of “tightening up.”

Post Status: Branching out: An interview with Peter Suhm

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 02/27/2019 - 22:15

In Peter’s words, “the most basic way to think of WP Pusher is that it replaces FTP with a flow where updates come directly from GitHub/Bitbucket” through the WordPress core auto-updater.

You may not know Peter built the first version of WP Pusher in a shopping mall in Thailand while traveling the globe for four years. Originally from Copenhagen, today Peter is settled down in Glasgow and has just launched Branch, a Docker-based build and deployment tool for WordPress developers that goes quite a bit further than WP Pusher. Branch is a continuous integration service for WordPress that adds “the ‘build’ and ‘test’ steps” before deployment.

DK: You’ve launched Branch with a manifesto that declares “WordPress developers are developers too” before outlining the well-known lack of modern tools for WordPress development. Why do you think that has been such a long-lamented situation and was there something unique in your experience that drove you to do something about it?

PS: One of the things that makes WordPress really special is its low barrier of entry. The 5-minute install and all of that. The WordPress community proudly consists of a large percentage of amateurs and hobbyists. A lot of people have their first experience with programming because of WordPress, which is great and something WordPress should be really proud of. Most development frameworks exist to make the developer more productive, but I think WordPress has another purpose. The purpose of WordPress is to democratize publishing (which is something user facing), not to be an awesome tool for developers. There are obviously some political decisions behind this lack as well. Religiously supporting outdated versions of PHP is just one of them. Not having any sort of dependency management, so everyone has to reinvent the wheel on each project is another one.

Every WordPress developer is asking the same questions. “How do I manage my dependencies?” or “how do I migrate changes to the database?” These are questions people literally ask me because I sell WordPress developer tools. Personally, I didn’t get into programming because of WordPress. I have been doing PHP development since my early teens, and my first job was as a Ruby on Rails junior developer. “Growing up” as a developer, I was raised very strictly! My co-workers would write failing unit tests for me, and I’d have to implement the code. This made me pretty religious about best practices, testing etc. After RoR I discovered Laravel in 2013 and helped build the Laravel community in Copenhagen. However, during high school, I had built quite a few different projects using WordPress for myself and my clients. Once in a while, I’d have to update these old WordPress sites, which always involved installing an FTP client. This was rough after five years of continuous deployment using Git and automated tests. I hate FTP with a passion. It’s an error-prone and outdated way to deploy your code.

Inspired by some of the tooling I knew from RoR and Laravel, I set out to build a better way to deploy WordPress code. After a lot of experimentation, I landed on WP Pusher. However, WP Pusher only moves the code. It doesn’t run your build scripts or your unit tests. It just blindly moves your code from a Git repository to WordPress. I was intentionally ignoring this problem for a while, being kind of intimidated by it I guess. However, people kept asking me the questions I described earlier, so I started experimenting again and believe I found a really cool solution with Branch. Branch is built on top of Docker, so everything you can imagine doing inside of Docker containers will eventually be available within Branch. A major part of building Branch is to make this great, but highly technical, stack available to WordPress developers.

The Branch Dashboard showing the configuration options for a theme’s build steps.

DK: Does Branch build on or incorporate WP Pusher, or are these totally separate technologies? As SaaS businesses, will they remain separate or merge? I imagine some of your agency customers for WP Pusher might want to move up to Branch, if they don’t lose anything in the process.

PS: The best way to understand Branch, and why it’s different from WP Pusher, is to imagine it as two separate parts: The build + test part (continuous integration) and the deployment part (continuous deployment). The deployment part of Branch very much builds upon WP Pusher. The build part is what’s new. It’s the missing link between developing on your local machine and shipping to production.

One of the things that excite me the most about Branch is that it’s a hosted SaaS, compared to WP Pusher which is “just” a WordPress plugin. That allows me to add a much more advanced feature set and ship much faster. With a SaaS, you are in control of the environment in which the software runs. That gives you a lot more flexibility and opportunity. I want WP Pusher to stay around for everyone to keep using. However, I want to make Branch so good that everyone wants to switch eventually. But WP Pusher will stay around. That’s for sure.

DK: What did you learn from life as a digital nomad? Have you given it up for good now, or do you plan to do more traveling?

PS: That’s a good question, I should probably spend some more time thinking about! I came into the “nomadic” lifestyle sort of by accident. It wasn’t very purposeful. I think on a personal level the number one lesson has been how important for me it is to have a base. Traveling for a long time, you become very aware of your roots. You spend a lot of time thinking about the good and the bad parts of being back home. I think ideally it allows you to go “home” and have a better idea of which parts of settled life you like, and which ones you’d rather be without.

On a business level, WP Pusher was born on the road and has a very different nature than most businesses. From day one it’s been a premise that I wasn’t always around 24/7. It’s never been a problem, because it’s never been an expectation. I’ve never had to change anything about WP Pusher to allow me to travel, because I was already traveling when I built it. Now I’m pretty settled, and I live with my fiancé and only travel for smaller trips. I’ll never stop traveling, hopefully, but I don’t think I’ll ever live on the road again! 

WPTavern: Gatsby WordPress Themes Project Partners with Theme Shops to Port Popular Themes to Gatsby

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 02/27/2019 - 19:50

Gatsby WordPress Themes is a new collaborative project led by Zac Gordon with help from Jason Bahl, Rich Tabor, Muhammad Muhsin, and Alexandra Spalato. The group is working together to port popular themes for use with Gatsby, the React-based static site generator that uses GraphQL for its data layer.

Known for its performance and ease of deployment, Gatsby has captured developers’ attention and was one of the rising stars of the React ecosystem throughout 2018. Using WordPress as a headless CMS, developers can pull data into Gatsby and enjoy the scalability, speed, and security that comes with serving static files.

Although static site generators have been around for awhile, the current Gatsby craze seems to be rooted in the fact that the project uses React, Webpack, and modern JavaScript and CSS.

“WordPress devs love Gatsby because it lets them throw away the entire old school PHP based WordPress theming system and built sites with React and GraphQL,” Gordon said.

“Gatsby devs are finding a new interest in WordPress because by default you have to edit Gatsby content in Markdown. WordPress gives a much richer editing experience.”

Jason Bahl, creator of the WPGraphQL project, is a technical advisor for the Gatsby WP Themes project. He was inspired to collaborate with the team because he thinks Gatsby has a lot of benefits for WordPress sites.

“The end result of a Gatsby site is a static site with no live Database connection,” Bahl said. “Just HTML and JavaScript files, so performance is better than even the most highly cached WordPress sites, and security is better because there’s no live database connection to be compromised.

“Also, Gatsby is fully React. With Gutenberg in core, WordPress developers are writing a LOT more React. Using Gatsby as the presentation layer for a site allows for components to be re-used across the admin and the theme, where now developers need to create React components for Gutenberg and PHP template partials for the ‘regular’ theme rendering.”

Regular WordPress theme are not immediately compatible with Gatsby, since the entire theme has to be built with React, but developers can use the same styles.

“We are taking a distinctly different direction than the WordPress themes on the Gatsby themes repo currently,” Gordon said. “We are going to base all of our themes on the WP GraphQL plugin. The default Gatsby themes now work on a wrapper on top of the REST API and don’t have live GraphQL endpoints, so they are limited.”

Gatsby WordPress Themes Project Partners with Theme Shops to Offer Free and Commercial Gatsby Themes

The Gatsby WordPress Themes project will offer a combination of free and commercial Gatsby themes. Gordon is partnering with theme shops that are open to his team doing the heavy lifting of porting popular themes over to Gatsby.

“The first two theme partners are Rich Tabor of CoBlocks and ThemeBeans, who is licensing us his super clean and Gutenberg perfect ‘Tabor’ premium theme,” Gordon said. “Then we have Leland Fiegel, a fellow DC WP chap and long time friend, from Themetry. They specialize in themes on WordPress.com, which means they are also battle tested. They have licensed us their great business theme Belmont.”

Gordon said the first versions of the Gatsby themes are targeted towards business and brochure sites that might have a couple pages laid out in Gutenberg and possibly a news/blog section and contact page.

“Since headless sites don’t work with a lot of plugins by default, the V1 of all the themes will be super opinionated and focused (but 100% extendable),” Gordon said.

“The final set of themes are from the WordPress default themes collection. We will have a detailed article showing how we ported the Twenty Nineteen theme over to a Gatsby theme and that will be the first of the default themes we do.”

Although this initiative is aimed at simpler WordPress sites, creating and maintaining a Gatsby site isn’t necessarily going to be well-suited to beginners.

“As far as the target audience, I think any WordPress site that doesn’t have super fast moving content – like the average marketing site or documentation site is perfect for Gatsby,” Bahl said.

“Gatsby does have a ‘Build’ step, where it collects ALL the data needed for the entire site, then outputs the content in the static Gatsby site. So even changing a typo on a post would require the ENTIRE SITE to rebuild, which can take anywhere from a few seconds to several minutes, which may not be acceptable for sites that need content live FAST (like a newspaper).

“But for your average WordPress site, waiting two minutes for your changes to be live in production is acceptable. Many heavily cached WordPress sites already experience a delay in content being live anyway.”

Gordon said he doesn’t believe Gatsby is the right fit for all WordPress sites but for certain projects it “can be a really cool approach both in terms of development experience and gains in speed and security.”

The group is aiming to have its first themes released for WordCamp Miami in mid-March and plans to release more as they make new partnerships and see an actual demand. Gordon is actively looking for more theme shops to bring on board.

“Zac will be primarily maintaining the Gatsby themes, though I’ll help where I’m needed,” ThemeBeans founder Rich Tabor said. “We’re still in the very initial stages of development.

“Overall, it’s a super interesting idea. Static site generators are increasing in popularity and Gatsby is pretty much leading the pack in terms of performance and ease-of-use — both of which WordPress is not particularly well-known for (but is making strides to improve).”

HeroPress: Know That You Are Not Alone

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 02/27/2019 - 12:00

I remember when I was about 10 years and my mom got our first ever computer. She went to the store and got a bunch of CD’s which I was hyped about because I knew some of them were games. She gave me a yellow box that had “Microsoft FrontPage” on the front and said, “Here, learn this”. She saw my confused face and said “It shows you how to build websites. The web is huge right now. If you have this skill, one day you can make a lot of money.” I did go through the course and was pretty good at HTML and CSS but never stuck with it.

Besides, no one else I knew was doing it and what do moms know anyway?

Everything. They know everything.

This was my first taste of coding. But it definitely wasn’t the last.

Growing Out

2016 was a bad year. I was still living in my hometown Philly, constantly working overtime at my low paying job, constantly stressed, trying to prove myself to a company that only viewed me as a number. That combined with the two hour commute both ways daily and I eventually burned myself out severely. I was so depressed that I would go to sleep crying and then wake back up crying again willing myself to get out of bed so that I could go to work. Eventually, I saw a therapist who diagnosed me with depression and she recommended that I take a break from work to recover. I was out of work for three months still recovering when my job called not to check on me, but to see when I was coming back. I ended up quitting over the phone, and never looked back.

But I knew I needed to find out what I wanted to do career-wise. I decided to start teaching myself HTML and CSS again to see what I could do with that skill. I took the CodeAcademy courses and was surprised at how much I remembered.

I eventually found someone who wanted me to do maintenance on their site for really cheap. I was excited because in just a couple of months I landed a client! But it was also a HUGE mistake.

He was constantly nagging me daily on fixing his site, and every time I would fix it he would find something else wrong. Worse part is that went on for months without me collecting any extra money from him. I didn’t have him sign a contract (BIG Mistake) and he would contact me at various hours which I always responded right away because I felt I had to (Another mistake). Eventually, it got to be too much and I had to cut him off completely. I learned quite a bit about the business of web development and knew I needed to do more research before jumping head first into this again.

A Leap Of Faith

Fast forward to December 2017, I got offered an IT Management job in DC and moved within a couple of weeks with only $50 in my pocket which no place to live. But I made it work.  I stayed in a hostel for two weeks while I found an apartment. My mom helped with getting the funds for my apartment and without her support, I don’t know think I would be here now. I stopped my web stuff for a while so I can focus on my transition. I’m not gonna lie, as much as I was happy to move here, I was also very lonely. The folks at my job were older and they were all family people, and I knew no one out here. But the biggest challenge was trying to run a whole IT department by myself and the upper-management C-Suite folks not having a clue about tech or why it costs so much. It also didn’t help that there were folks that had a huge dislike of IT and therefore transferred that dislike to me. I knew about a month into this job that this wasn’t going to be the path that I was going an needed to do something else.

I searched online for a web course that would help me learn front-end development and eventually I came across Skillcrush. They were offering a course to teach WordPress development and all you needed to know was HTML and CSS. They offered the course for $150 a month for 3 months. After researching and seeing how many companies were using WordPress and the value in it I decided to take the plunge and take the course. I started in May and completed it in August.

While taking the course I joined their Slack and met a group of amazing women, some who were alumni and found success from freelancing building websites with WordPress. They shared advice and tips on how to find clients and freelance and how they made the transition.

I took all the knowledge I saw and absorbed it like a sponge. Then in September, I took the plunge and quit my job.

Finding Community

Now, this was reckless of me. While I did have some savings to keep me afloat for a minute I never planned this out. If you’re going to freelance I highly recommend you don’t go this route. I started looking everywhere I could to get gigs. Upwork was the most successful platform especially for finding WordPress gigs. I was able to find a few successful gigs and luckily got to work with a web agency which gave me a steady stream of income for a while. I learned how to do contracts, set rates and expectations and through these methods and more was able to secure quality clients that I still work with today. One client referred me to others who needed work, which brought in even more income. While I was doing this I also decided to join Twitter and found a community of other black folks who were also starting their tech journey. I was able to help others and well as ask for advice when I needed it. Finally, I no longer felt alone.

But then in February, the agency jobs started to slow down. I could have gone a little longer without a proper job but I decided to go back into the workforce because I wanted to build back up my savings faster and also invest in other parts of my business. So I decided to get back into the job world and got a contract job with the federal government. The job was good and I did so well that after 2 months they offered me a full-time position. I still work at this job to this day.

As for my WordPress websites, I still do work for existing clients if they really need it. In addition, I run a blog called #WordPressWednesday (now named #WordPressWisdom) where I share tips and tricks on all things WordPress. But my journey isn’t over. I recently got accepted into Flatiron Software Development Bootcamp where I will be diving into more backend development. I also have a lot of other things coming which I can’t share just yet. It took a lot of work to get to this point.

I don’t think I would have ever gotten to this point without the support of the tech community on Twitter and most notably the Digital Empire community that I’m a part of.

Having a place to share resources, tips and jokes daily have kept me motivated and going for the past year.

WordPress for me has been a life skill that has brought wealth. It has given me the ability to generate a whole other means of income as well and give resources to other people who are looking for a place to start in the coding world. But it wasn’t an easy journey to get this point. And if you feel stuck like I was, know that there are people here for you. Start your journey today. Get on Twitter and introduce yourself to the community. Ask for help. And most importantly, know that you are not alone.

The post Know That You Are Not Alone appeared first on HeroPress.

WPTavern: Block Editor Now in Beta for WordPress Mobile Apps

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 02/27/2019 - 01:00

The new Gutenberg block editor that arrived in WordPress 5.0 is now in beta testing on the mobile apps. The editor will be available in version 11.9, which is planned to be released to the public on March 11.

“For this first version, our main focus was to build a pleasant writing experience with support for the most basic types of content,” WordPress mobile engineer Jorge Bernal said.

“Our data showed that 90%+ of the posts created on the mobile apps consisted of basic text and images, so we decided to focus on supporting the Paragraph, Image, and Heading blocks on this version.”

The interface looks similar to using Gutenberg on desktop, but it has been pared back to allow for only the most commonly used blocks and access to simple block settings.

The block editor in the Android app feels noticeably slower on mobile than the previous editor. It’s not yet an improvement on the existing mobile editor but it’s still in beta. Even though it’s still rough around the edges, the posting interface is more consistent with what users experience on the desktop. During this transition time, users will retain the ability to use either editor, since the Gutenberg implementation just provides the basics for now.

After version 11.9 rolls out to the apps, users can choose if they want to use the block editor. The app detects which editor a post was created with and will automatically open it when a user attempts to edit a post. Users can manually switch back to the old editor for posts that have blocks by selecting “Switch to Classic Editor” under the ellipses menu. New posts will still use the Classic Editor by default but users can change the default to the block editor by going to Me > App Settings and enabling the “Use Block Editor” option.

After 11.9 is released the team plans to work on UX improvements and bug fixes before moving on to add support for the most common blocks and use cases.

WPTavern: Block Management Features Proposed for WordPress 5.2

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 02/25/2019 - 17:22

WordPress 5.1 has been downloaded more than 3.6 million times since its release last week and work on 5.2 is now underway. The upcoming release will be led by Matt Mullenweg with Josepha Haden acting as Release Coordinator. Gary Pendergast posted a proposed scope and schedule that would have 5.2 arriving April 23, 2019.

One of the proposed features is block management, the ability for users to hide or turn off blocks that they are not using. An avalanche of blocks is pouring into the WordPress ecosystem, especially with the push to convert core widgets to blocks. Users’ expectations will soon become firmly rooted in the concept of the block interface as widgets slowly become a relic of the past. It’s also quite common for users to install block collections that introduce a dozen or more new blocks when they really only have use for a handful of blocks.

Several standalone plugins already provide block management features, such as Gutenberg Manager and Disable Gutenberg Blocks. They all have different UI’s and approaches to letting users turn off blocks. For example, Gutenberg Manager uses a tabbed interface with checkboxes for disabling core blocks. The Disable Gutenberg Blocks plugin offers an admin screen that is similar to plugin management:

A few block collections have also implemented their own block management features, including Advanced Gutenberg Blocks and CoBlocks. Advanced Gutenberg Blocks adds a screen under its own top level menu for disabling blocks.

CoBlocks recently introduced a block management feature that is one of the more elegant implementations currently available. It adds the block management interface inline with the editor in a modal window, instead of relegating it to its own admin page. It also offers the ability to turn entire categories on/off.

After CoBlocks announced its block management feature, Nick Hamze contended that this should be replicated for WordPress core. His comments received a bit of pushback from Gutenberg technical lead Riad Benguella who sees it as a feature for more advanced users.

Yeah, nice plugin. It feels like something for advanced WordPress users / developers / agencies… and not something that should be baked in initially but happy to discuss.

— Riad Benguella (@riadbenguella) February 15, 2019

“The ability to disable blocks seems pretty basic,” Hamze responded. “Rich didn’t make this feature for fun. Regular users (not advanced ones or developers) asked for this. He made it to solve a problem that real users are having. You are telling me that more regular users will use the Amazon Kindle Embed Block (that is being baking into 5.1) than would like the ability to turn off blocks they don’t want to use.”

Last week when I spoke to Benguella about the possibility of block management capabilities being included in core sometime in the future, he said it wasn’t an immediate priority for the project.

“Block management is not an immediate focus in the Gutenberg roadmap and is considered plugin territory, but we keep close attention to the work done in the community and adapt in case user research and suggestions that bring value for the majority of users,” Benguella said. “My personal opinion for the moment is that, these are advanced features not required by every user of WordPress.

“That said, it’s important to enable plugin developers to implement more block management features, and one important piece of the puzzle here is the work we’re doing right now to improve the block registration and discovery both using REST APIs, PHP helpers and JavaScript APIs.”

The project’s priorities seem to have changed since that time, as block management is now a strong consideration for WordPress 5.2. Thousands of users have already installed a plugin that includes these kinds of capabilities, a good indication that there is a demand for this. As everything in the plugin ecosystem gradually moves towards blocks, it will be easy for users to get inundated by the many blocks available in the editor. Plugins are currently answering users’ needs with many different UI’s for turning blocks on/off. It’s clear that WordPress core needs to lead the way by providing a standard UI for block management.

In recent #core-editor chats Benguella said he has some concerns regarding the short time frame for the newly proposed block management feature, but is starting initial explorations of what the first iteration may look like in WordPress 5.2.

“So in addition to the currently shipped enhancements and the work done on the widget blocks, there has been a bunch of requests and feedback suggesting the need for a block management solution and block directory work,” Benguella said. “This is actually proposed for 5.2 and something we need to start thinking about and exploring the existing possibilities.”

Pendergast referenced CoBlocks’ implementation in his 5.2 scope and schedule post as an example of how plugin developers have approached block management.

“We weren’t the first by far, but I’d argue it’s clearly the best experience,” CoBlocks author Rich Tabor said. “I built it because folks have been asking for just that, and I wanted to deliver a much better experience than asking them to go to a WP admin page elsewhere. I’d love to see something like the Block Manager in core and am available to help out in any way I can.”

Other proposed features for WordPress 5.2 include the Site Health Check plugin, PHP error protection, and package signing for updates. The first beta is expected March 14, 2019, and RC 1 is slated for April 10, 2019.

WPTavern: Ecwid E-Commerce Plugin Adds Gutenberg Support, Focuses on Small Businesses to Compete with WooCommerce

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 02/22/2019 - 19:57

Ecwid’s e-commerce plugin for WordPress is now fully integrated with the Gutenberg editor. The cloud-based store builder, pronounced “eck-wid,” is short for e-commerce widgets, but the service has fully embraced blocks in its latest releases.

The new default Storefront block comes pre-installed and embeds the entire Ecwid store on a page, including product listing, filters, navigation, and checkout. It provides a quick way for a new seller to get everything working without having to do anything besides add the plugin. Inside the block sidebar, the seller can tweak the storefront’s appearance, including thumbnails, page layout, colors, and other settings. The short screencast below shows the block in action and part of it was featured during Matt Mullenweg’s State of the Word address in December 2018.

Ecwid also has a new Single Product block with a buy now button. It enables sellers to select a product and display it as a card with an image, title, and buy now button. This is convenient for using inside a blog post without having to open the whole storefront.

The team behind Ecwid is working on adding more Gutenberg blocks, despite having only a small fraction of their customers using WordPress. The company has more than 1.5 million customers running stores in 175 countries, but only 1.3% (20,000) are using WordPress. Even with so few active installations of the company’s WordPress plugin, Ecwid has its sights set on competing with WooCommerce, the most dominant player in this spacee. Last year at WordCamp Moscow, Ecwid Product Manager Matvey Kuritsyn gave a presentation titled “Why does anyone need a WooCommerce alternative?” Much of the company’s strategy is outlined in the slides from that presentation.

“We are focusing on small businesses and resolving their problems — where WooCommerce is weak,” Ecwid Marketing Manager Kseniya Pinkova said. She identified a few ways that Ecwid is working to differentiate itself from competitors:

  • Ecwid is easy-to-use. Developers can set it up very quickly, but also the end users can do that themselves. 75% of Ecwid installations on WordPress are made by the end users, not developers.
  • With Ecwid, everything is in the cloud, which means we handle updates, security patches, backups, huge loads ourselves (with no actions required on the user side).
  • Ecwid is secure, it’s PCI DSS Level 1 certified – a bank level of security.
  • Ecwid works with any hosting (even the cheapest and crappiest ones) even if you have 10,000 products in your store.
  • Ecwid provides customers support by email, chat, and phone.

This level of security, support, and maintenance is only available for WooCommerce via a managed solution like WordPress.com or Liquid Web, but sellers may still struggle with setup and customization due to the vast number of options and integrations available. Ecwid is focusing on its strengths as a SaaS-only solution to target small businesses in the WordPress space, instead of trying to replicate all the features that the dominant plugins already have.

The company started in 2009 and has a distributed team of 160 people who work in development, IT, operations, support, content, and business development.

“The WordPress plugin is technically a separate application (because Ecwid is a cloud solution, SaaS), and it appeared in 2009 as well,” Pinkova said. “But everything is interconnected — when a new featured is released in Ecwid, WordPress plugin users see it appear in their stores as well and can use it even without updating their WordPress plugin. For example, we rolled out new in-house Product Filters last week and they are now available for all Ecwid users, including those using WordPress. Some other features touch the WordPress plugin code — for example, some SEO enhancements involve both robust cloud part (API) and changes on the plugin side. The Gutenberg block is a good example of a third kind of Ecwid feature — it mostly resides in the plugin and it’s great to see how it improves the experience of our WordPress user base segment specifically.”

Ecwid’s roadmap for 2019 includes tighter integration with Facebook and Instagram, an in-house multilingual catalog, and marketing features to help small businesses find their customers. Because the WordPress plugin essentially hooks up the cloud-based solution, many of the features and improvements on Ecwid’s general roadmap for all platforms will be automatically available whenever they roll out.

“Regarding our WordPress plugin, the main thing for us is Gutenberg,” Pinkova said. “We’re very excited about it, we’re looking forward to new features Gutenberg is going to provide, and working on our plugin to make sure we’re making those available and easy-to-use for Ecwid sellers.”

Sketch Box

Drupal Themes - Fri, 02/22/2019 - 17:34

Sketch Box will be a theme based on Bootstrap 4 and bs_bootstrap base theme. The goal is to create a base theme with a sketch look which looks cool but also is very usable for rapid site building and content prototyping.

Toolkit

WPTavern: WordPress 5.1 Improves Editor Performance, Encourages Users to Update Outdated PHP Versions

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 02/22/2019 - 00:29

image credit: National Jazz Museum in Harlem

WordPress 5.1 “Betty” was released today, honoring American jazz singer Betty Carter. This is the first major release since Gutenberg came into core. As part of WordPress’ 2019 “tighten up” theme, this release was focused on improving performance in the editor and helping users update outdated versions of PHP.

WordPress 5.0 had been downloaded more than 35 million times prior to 5.1’s release. Users who have adopted the block editor will notice that it is much more responsive and writing posts should feel smoother. WordPress 5.1 includes the performance improvements from Gutenberg 4.8 – faster page initialization time, improved typing performance, and optimization of various background processes.

This release introduces new features from the Site Health project. WordPress will now detect if a site is running on an insecure, outdated version of PHP and display a notice in the dashboard with information about how to update PHP. It also includes checks for PHP version compatibility with plugins. WordPress 5.1+ will prevent users from installing plugins that require newer versions of PHP than they have running.

This release also introduces a medley of miscellaneous improvements under the hood for developers, including (but not limited to) the following:

  • New database table to store metadata associated with multisite networks
  • Updated Cron API with new functions to assist with returning data, new filters for modifying cron storage
  • New JavaScript build processes
  • Updates to values for the WP_DEBUG_LOG constant
  • Improved taxonomy metabox sanitization

WordPress 5.1 was led by Matt Mullenweg with help from Gary Pendergast and 561 contributors. Approximately 41% (231 people) were new contributors to the project.

WordPress.org blog: WordPress 5.1 “Betty”

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 22:48
A Little Better Every Day

Version 5.1 of WordPress, named “Betty” in honour of acclaimed jazz vocalist Betty Carter, is available for download or update in your WordPress dashboard.

Following WordPress 5.0 — a major release which introduced the new block editor — 5.1 focuses on polish, in particular by improving the overall performance of the editor. In addition, this release paves the way for a better, faster, and more secure WordPress with some essential tools for site administrators and developers.

Site Health

With security and speed in mind, this release introduces WordPress’s first Site Health features. WordPress will start showing notices to administrators of sites that run long-outdated versions of PHP, which is the programming language that powers WordPress.

When you install new plugins, WordPress’s Site Health features will check them against the version of PHP you’re running. If the plugin requires a version that won’t work with your site, WordPress will keep you from installing that plugin.

Editor Performance

Introduced in WordPress 5.0, the new block editor continues to improve. Most significantly, WordPress 5.1 includes solid performance improvements within the editor. The editor should feel a little quicker to start, and typing should feel smoother.

Expect more performance improvements in the next couple of releases.

Developer Happiness Multisite Metadata

5.1 introduces a new database table to store metadata associated with sites and allows for the storage of arbitrary site data relevant in a multisite / network context.

Cron API

The Cron API has been updated with new functions to assist with returning data and includes new filters for modifying cron storage. Other changes in behavior affect cron spawning on servers running FastCGI and PHP-FPM versions 7.0.16 and above.

New JS Build Processes

WordPress 5.1 features a new JavaScript build option, following the large reorganisation of code that started in the 5.0 release.

Other Developer Goodness

Miscellaneous improvements include:

  • Updates to values for the WP_DEBUG_LOG constant
  • New test config file constant in the test suite, new plugin action hooks
  • Short-circuit filters for wp_unique_post_slug(), WP_User_Query, and count_users()
  • A new human_readable_duration function
  • Improved taxonomy metabox sanitization
  • Limited LIKE support for meta keys when using WP_Meta_Query
  • A new “doing it wrong” notice when registering REST API endpoints

…and more!

The Squad

This release was led by Matt Mullenweg, along with Gary Pendergast as Senior Code Reshuffler and Poet. They received wonderful assistance from the following 561 contributors for this release, 231 of whom were making their first ever contribution! Pull up some Betty Carter on your music service of choice, and check out some of their profiles:

0x6f0, 1265578519, 1naveengiri, 360zen, aardrian, Aaron Jorbin, Abdullah Ramzan, Abhay Vishwakarma, Abhijit Rakas, Achal Jain, achbed, Adam Silverstein, Ajit Bohra, Alain Schlesser, aldavigdis, alejandroxlopez, Alex, Alex Concha, Alex Shiels, Alexander Botteram, Alexandru Vornicescu, alexgso, allancole, Allen Snook, Alvaro Gois dos Santos, Ana Cirujano, Anantajit JG, Andrea Fercia, Andrea Gandino, Andrea Middleton, andrei0x309, andreiglingeanu, Andrew Duthie, Andrew Lima, Andrew Nacin, Andrew Nevins, Andrew Ozz, Andrey Savchenko, Andrés Maneiro, Andy Fragen, Andy Meerwaldt, Angelika Reisiger, Antal Tettinger, antipole, Anton Timmermans, Anton Vanyukov, Antonio Villegas, antonioeatgoat, Anwer AR, Arun, Ashar Irfan, ashokrd2013, Ayesh Karunaratne, Ayub Adiputra, Barry Ceelen, Behzod Saidov, Ben Byrne, benhuberman, Benoit Chantre, benvaassen, Bhargav Mehta, bikecrazyy, Birgir Erlendsson, BjornW, Blair jersyer, Blobfolio, bobbingwide, boblinthorst, Boone Gorges, Boro Sitnikovski, Brad Parbs, Bradley Taylor, bramheijmink, Brandon Kraft, Brandon Payton, Brent Swisher, Brian Richards, bridgetwillard, Brooke., bruceallen, bulletdigital, Burhan Nasir, Bytes.co, Caleb Burks, Calin Don, campusboy, carolinegeven, ccismaru, chasewg, Chetan Prajapati, Chouby, ChriCo, chriscct7, Christopher Spires, claudiu, Clifford Paulick, Code Clinic, codegrau, coleh, conner_bw, Corey McKrill, croce, Csaba (LittleBigThings), Cyrus Collier, Daniel Bachhuber, Daniel James, Daniel Koskinen, Daniel Richards, Daniele Scasciafratte, danimalbrown, Danny Cooper, Danny de Haan, Darko A7, Darren Ethier, Dave Pullig, David A. Kennedy, David Anderson, David Binovec, David Cramer, David Herrera, David Lingren, David Shanske, David Stone, dekervit, Denis Yanchevskiy, Dennis Snell, designsimply, dfangstrom, Dhanendran, Dharmesh Patel, Dhaval kasavala, Dhruvin, DiedeExterkate, Dilip Bheda, dingo-d, Dion Hulse, dipeshkakadiya, Dominik Schilling, Donncha O Caoimh, dontstealmyfish, Drew Jaynes, Drivingralle, dschalk, dsifford, eamax, eArtboard, edo888, ElectricFeet, Ella Van Durpe, Emil Dotsev, Eric Andrew Lewis, Eric Daams, Erich Munz, Erick Hitter, ericmeyer, etoledom, Evan Solomon, Evangelos Athanasiadis, Faisal Alvi, Felipe Elia, Felix Arntz, Fernando Claussen, flipkeijzer, Florian TIAR, FPCSJames, Frank Klein, fuchsws, fullyint, Gabriel Maldonado, Gareth, Garrett Hyder, Gary Jones, Gennady Kovshenin, Gerhard Potgieter, Girish Panchal, GM_Alex, gnif, graymouser, greg, Grzegorz Ziółkowski, Guido, GutenDev, Hafiz Rahman, Hai@LiteSpeed, Hans-Christiaan Braun, Hardeep Asrani, Hardik Amipara, Harsh Patel, haruharuharuby, Heather Burns, Helen Hou-Sandi, Henry Wright, Herre Groen, Hitendra Chopda, Ian Belanger, Ian Dunn, ibantxillo, Ignacio Cruz Moreno, Igor, Igor Benic, imath, ionvv, Irene Strikkers, isabel104, ishitaka, Ivan Mudrik, J.D. Grimes, Jack Reichert, Jacob Peattie, Jake Spurlock, James Nylen, janak Kaneriya, janalwin, Janki Moradiya, janthiel, Jason Caldwell, javorszky, Jaydip Rami, Jayman Pandya, Jb Audras, Jeff Farthing, Jeffrey de Wit, Jeffrey Paul, Jennifer M. Dodd, Jenny, Jeremey, Jeremy Felt, Jeremy Herve, Jeremy Pry, Jeremy Scott, Jesper V Nielsen, Jesse Friedman, Jimmy Comack, Jip Moors, Jiri Hon, JJJ, joanrho, Job, Joe Bailey-Roberts, Joe Dolson, Joe Hoyle, Joe McGill, Joel James , Joen Asmussen, Johan Falk, John Blackbourn, John Godley, johnalarcon, johnpgreen, johnschulz, Jonathan Champ, Jonathan Desrosiers, joneiseman, Jonny Harris, Joost de Valk, Jorge Costa, Joseph Scott, JoshuaWold, Joy, jpurdy647, jrdelarosa, jryancard, Juhi Patel, Julia Amosova, juliemoynat, Juliette Reinders Folmer, Junaid Ahmed, Justin Sainton, Justin Sternberg, Justin Tadlock, K.Adam White, kapteinbluf, keesiemeijer, Kelly Dwan, kelvink, khaihong, Kiran Potphode, Kite, Kjell Reigstad, kkarpieszuk, kmeze, Knut Sparhell, konainm, Konstantin Obenland, Konstantinos Xenos, kristastevens, krutidugade, laghee, Laken Hafner, Lance Willett, laurelfulford, lbenicio, Leander Iversen, leemon, lenasterg, lisannekluitmans, lizkarkoski, Luca Grandicelli, LucasRolff, luciano-croce, Luke Carbis, Luminus, Mário Valney, maartenleenders, macbookandrew, Maja Benke, Mako, mallorydxw-old, Manuel Augustin, manuel_84, Marc Nilius, marcelo2605, Marco Martins, marco.marsala, Marcus Kazmierczak, marcwieland95, Marius L. J., mariusvw, Mariyan Belchev, Mark Jaquith, Mathieu Sarrasin, mathieuhays, Matt Cromwell, Matt Gibbs, Matt Martz, Matthew Boynes, Matthew Riley MacPherson, mattyrob, mcmwebsol, Mel Choyce, mensmaximus, mermel, metalandcoffee, Micah Wood, Michael Nelson, Michiel Heijmans, Migrated to @sebastienserre, Miguel Fonseca, Miguel Torres, mihaiiceyro, mihdan, Mike Gillihan, Mike Jolley, Mike Schroder, Milan Dinić, Milan Ivanovic, Milana Cap, Milind More, mirkoschubert, Monika Rao, Monique Dubbelman, moto hachi ( mt8.biz ), mrmadhat, Muhammad Kashif, Mukesh Panchal, MultiformeIngegno, Muntasir Mahmud, munyagu, MyThemeShop, mzorz, nadim0988, nandorsky, Naoki Ohashi, Naoko Takano, nataliashitova, Nate Allen, Nathan Johnson, ndavison, Ned Zimmerman, Nextendweb, Nick Diego, Nick Halsey, Nick Momrik, Nick the Geek, Nicolas Figueira, Nicolas GUILLAUME, Nicolle Helgers, Nidhi Jain, Niels Lange, Nikhil Chavan, Nilambar Sharma, Noam Eppel, notnownikki, odyssey, Omar Reiss, Omkar Bhagat, Ov3rfly, Paal Joachim Romdahl, palmiak, panchen, parbaugh, Parham Ghaffarian, Pascal Birchler, Pascal Casier, Paul Bearne, Paul Biron, Paul Paradise, Paul Schreiber, Perdaan, Peter Putzer, Peter Wilson, Petter Walbø Johnsgård, Pierre Saïkali, Pieter Daalder, Piyush Patel, poena, Pramod Jodhani, Prashant Baldha, Pratik K. Yadav, Pratik K. Yadav, precies, Presskopp, Presslabs, PressTigers, programmin, Punit Patel, Purnendu Dash, Qucheng, Rachel Baker, Rachel Cherry, Rachel Peter, Rafsun Chowdhury, Rahul Prajapati, Raja Mohammed, Ramanan, Rami Yushuvaev, Ramiz Manked, ramonopoly, RavanH, redcastor, remyvv, rensw90, rhetorical, Riad Benguella, Rian Rietveld, Richard Tape, Ricky Lee Whittemore, Rinku Y, Rishi Shah, Robbie, robdxw, Robert Anderson, Robin Cornett, Robin van der Vliet, Ryan McCue, Ryan Paul, Ryan Welcher, ryotsun, Sébastien SERRE, Saša, sagarnasit, Sami Ahmed Siddiqui, Sami Keijonen, Samuel Wood (Otto), sarah semark, Sayed Taqui, Scott Lee, Scott Reilly, Sean Hayes, Sebastian Kurzynoswki, Sebastian Pisula, Sergey Biryukov, Shamim Hasan, Shane Eckert, Sharaz Shahid, Shashwat Mittal, Shawn Hooper, sherwood, Shital Marakana, Shiva Poudel, Simon Prosser, Sjardo, skoldin, slilley, slushman, Sonja Leix, sonjanyc, Soren Wrede, spartank, spyderbytes, Stanimir Stoyanov, Stanko Metodiev, stazdotio, Stephen Edgar, Stephen Harris, stevenlinx, Storm Rockwell, Stoyan Kostadinov, strategio, Subrata Sarkar, Sultan Nasir Uddin, swift, Takahashi Fumiki, Takayuki Miyauchi, Tammie Lister, Taylor Lovett, teddytime, Terri Ann, terwdan, tharsheblows, ThemeZee, Thomas Patrick Levy, Thomas Vitale, thomaswm, Thorsten Frommen, Thrijith Thankachan, Tiago Hillebrandt, tigertech, Tim Havinga, Tim Hengeveld, Timmy Crawford, Timothy Jacobs, titodevera, Tkama, Tobias Zimpel, Tom J Nowell, TomHarrigan, Tommy Ferry, tonybogdanov, Tor-Bjorn Fjellner, TorontoDigits, Toshihiro Kanai, Towhidul Islam, transl8or, Ulrich, upadalavipul, Usman Khalid, Utsav tilava, uttam007, Vaishali Panchal, Valérie Galassi, valchovski, vishaldodiya, vnsavage, voneff, vortfu, warmlaundry, wbrubaker, Weston Ruter, Will Kwon, William Earnhardt, williampatton, wpzinc, xhezairi, Yahil Madakiya, Yoav Farhi, Yui, YuriV, Zane Matthew, and zebulan.

Finally, thanks to all the community translators who worked on WordPress 5.1. Their efforts bring WordPress 5.1 fully translated to 34 languages at release time, with more on the way.

If you want to follow along or help out, check out Make WordPress and our core development blog.

Thanks for choosing WordPress!

WordPress 5.1 “Betty”

Wordpress News - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 22:48
A Little Better Every Day

Version 5.1 of WordPress, named “Betty” in honour of acclaimed jazz vocalist Betty Carter, is available for download or update in your WordPress dashboard.

Following WordPress 5.0 — a major release which introduced the new block editor — 5.1 focuses on polish, in particular by improving the overall performance of the editor. In addition, this release paves the way for a better, faster, and more secure WordPress with some essential tools for site administrators and developers.

Site Health

With security and speed in mind, this release introduces WordPress’s first Site Health features. WordPress will start showing notices to administrators of sites that run long-outdated versions of PHP, which is the programming language that powers WordPress.

When you install new plugins, WordPress’s Site Health features will check them against the version of PHP you’re running. If the plugin requires a version that won’t work with your site, WordPress will keep you from installing that plugin.

Editor Performance

Introduced in WordPress 5.0, the new block editor continues to improve. Most significantly, WordPress 5.1 includes solid performance improvements within the editor. The editor should feel a little quicker to start, and typing should feel smoother.

Expect more performance improvements in the next couple of releases.

Developer Happiness Multisite Metadata

5.1 introduces a new database table to store metadata associated with sites and allows for the storage of arbitrary site data relevant in a multisite / network context.

Cron API

The Cron API has been updated with new functions to assist with returning data and includes new filters for modifying cron storage. Other changes in behavior affect cron spawning on servers running FastCGI and PHP-FPM versions 7.0.16 and above.

New JS Build Processes

WordPress 5.1 features a new JavaScript build option, following the large reorganisation of code that started in the 5.0 release.

Other Developer Goodness

Miscellaneous improvements include:

  • Updates to values for the WP_DEBUG_LOG constant
  • New test config file constant in the test suite, new plugin action hooks
  • Short-circuit filters for wp_unique_post_slug(), WP_User_Query, and count_users()
  • A new human_readable_duration function
  • Improved taxonomy metabox sanitization
  • Limited LIKE support for meta keys when using WP_Meta_Query
  • A new “doing it wrong” notice when registering REST API endpoints

…and more!

The Squad

This release was led by Matt Mullenweg, along with Gary Pendergast as Senior Code Reshuffler and Poet. They received wonderful assistance from the following 561 contributors for this release, 231 of whom were making their first ever contribution! Pull up some Betty Carter on your music service of choice, and check out some of their profiles:

0x6f0, 1265578519, 1naveengiri, 360zen, aardrian, Aaron Jorbin, Abdullah Ramzan, Abhay Vishwakarma, Abhijit Rakas, Achal Jain, achbed, Adam Silverstein, Ajit Bohra, Alain Schlesser, aldavigdis, alejandroxlopez, Alex, Alex Shiels, Alexander Botteram, Alexandru Vornicescu, alexgso, All, allancole, Allen Snook, Alvaro Gois dos Santos, Ana Cirujano, Anantajit JG, Andrés, Andrea Fercia, Andrea Gandino, Andrea Middleton, andrei0x309, andreiglingeanu, Andrew Duthie, Andrew Lima, Andrew Nacin, Andrew Nevins, Andrew Ozz, Andrey Savchenko, Andy Fragen, Andy Meerwaldt, Angelika Reisiger, Antal Tettinger, antipole, Anton Timmermans, Antonio Villegas, antonioeatgoat, Anwer AR, Arun, Ashar Irfan, ashokrd2013, Ayesh Karunaratne, Ayub Adiputra, Barry Ceelen, Behzod Saidov, Ben Byrne, benhuberman, Benoit Chantre, benvaassen, Bhargav Mehta, bikecrazyy, Birgir Erlendsson, BjornW, Blair jersyer, blob, Blobfolio, bobbingwide, boblinthorst, Boone Gorges, Boro Sitnikovski, Brad Parbs, Bradley, bramheijmink, Brandon Kraft, Brandon Payton, Brent Swisher, Brian Richards, bridgetwillard, Brooke., bruceallen, Burhan Nasir, Bytes.co, Caleb Burks, Calin Don, campusboy, carolinegeven, ccismaru, chasewg, Chetan Prajapati, Chouby, ChriCo, chriscct7, Christopher Spires, claudiu, Clifford Paulick, Code Clinic, codegrau, coleh, conner_bw, Corey McKrill, croce, Csaba (LittleBigThings), Cyrus Collier, Daniel Bachhuber, Daniel James, Daniel Koskinen, Daniel Richards, Daniele Scasciafratte, danimalbrown, Danny Cooper, Danny de Haan, Darko A7, Darren Ethier (nerrad), Dave Pullig, David A. Kennedy, David Anderson, David Binovec, David Cramer, David Herrera, David Lingren, David Shanske, David Stone, dekervit, Denis Yanchevskiy, Dennis Snell, designsimply, dfangstrom, Dhanendran, Dharmesh Patel, Dhaval kasavala, Dhruvin, DiedeExterkate, Dilip Bheda, dingo-d, Dion Hulse, dipeshkakadiya, Dominik Schilling, Donncha O Caoimh, dontstealmyfish, Drew Jaynes, Drivingralle, dschalk, dsifford, eamax, eArtboard, edo888, edocev, ElectricFeet, Ella Van Durpe, Eric Andrew Lewis, Eric Daams, Erich Munz, Erick Hitter, ericmeyer, etoledom, Evan Solomon, Evangelos Athanasiadis, ever, everyone, Faisal Alvi, Felipe Elia, Felix Arntz, Fernando Claussen, flipkeijzer, Florian TIAR, folio, FPCSJames, Frank Klein, frOM, fuchsws, fullyint, Gabriel Maldonado, Gareth, Garrett Hyder, Gary Jones, Gennady Kovshenin, Gerhard Potgieter, Girish Panchal, GM_Alex, gnif, graymouser, greg, Grzegorz (Greg) Ziółkowski, Guido, GutenDev, Hafiz Rahman, Hai@LiteSpeed, Hans-Christiaan Braun, Hardeep Asrani, Hardik Amipara, Harsh Patel, haruharuharuby, Heather Burns, Helen Hou-Sandi, Henry Wright, Herre Groen, hitendra, Hitendra Chopda, Ian Belanger, Ian Dunn, ibantxillo, Ignacio Cruz Moreno, Igor, Igor Benic, imath, ionvv, Irene Strikkers, isabel104, ishitaka, Ivan Mudrik, J.D. Grimes, Jack Reichert, Jacob Peattie, James Nylen, janak Kaneriya, janalwin, Janki Moradiya, janthiel, Jason Caldwell, javorszky, Jaydip Rami, Jayman Pandya, Jb Audras, Jeff Farthing, Jeffrey de Wit, Jeffrey Paul, Jennifer M. Dodd, Jenny, Jeremey, Jeremy Felt, Jeremy Herve, Jeremy Pry, Jeremy Scott, Jesper V Nielsen, Jesse Friedman, Jimmy Comack, Jip Moors, Jiri Hon, JJJ, joanrho, Job, Joe Bailey-Roberts, Joe Dolson, Joe Hoyle, Joe McGill, Joel James, Joen Asmussen, John Blackbourn, John Godley, johnalarcon, johnpgreen, johnschulz, Jonathan Champ, Jonathan Desrosiers, joneiseman, Jonny Harris, Joost de Valk, Jorge Costa, Joseph Scott, JoshuaWold, Joy, jpurdy647, jrdelarosa, jryancard, Juhi Patel, Julia Amosova, juliemoynat, Juliette Reinders Folmer, Junaid Ahmed, Justin Sainton, Justin Sternberg, Justin Tadlock, K.Adam White, kapteinbluf, keesiemeijer, Kelly Dwan, kelvink, khaihong, Kiran Potphode, Kite, kjellr, kkarpieszuk, kmeze, Knut Sparhell, konainm, Konstantin Obenland, Konstantinos Xenos, kristastevens, krutidugade, laghee, Laken Hafner, Lance Willett, laurelfulford, lbenicio, Leander Iversen, leemon, lenasterg, lisannekluitmans, lizkarkoski, Luca Grandicelli, LucasRolff, Luciano Croce, Luminus, Mário Valney, maartenleenders, macbookandrew, Maja Benke, Mako, mallorydxw-old, Manuel Augustin, manuel_84, Marc Nilius, marcelo2605, Marco Martins, marco.marsala, Marcus Kazmierczak, marcwieland95, Marius L. J., mariusvw, Mariyan Belchev, Mark Jaquith, Mathieu Sarrasin, mathieuhays, Matt Cromwell, Matt Gibbs, Matt Martz, Matthew Boynes, Matthew Riley MacPherson, mattyrob, mcmwebsol, Mel Choyce, mensmaximus, mermel, metalandcoffee, Micah Wood, Michael Nelson, Michiel Heijmans, Migrated to @sebastienserre, Miguel Fonseca, Miguel Torres, mihaiiceyro, mihdan, Mike Gillihan, Mike Jolley, Mike Schroder, Milan Dinić, Milan Ivanovic, Milana Cap, Milind More, mirkoschubert, Monika Rao, Monique Dubbelman, moto hachi ( mt8.biz ), mrmadhat, Muhammad Kashif, Mukesh Panchal, MultiformeIngegno, Muntasir Mahmud, munyagu, MyThemeShop, mzorz, nadim0988, nandorsky, Naoki Ohashi, Naoko Takano, nataliashitova, Nate Allen, Nathan Johnson, ndavison, Ned Zimmerman, Nextendweb, Nick Diego, Nick Halsey, Nick Momrik, Nick the Geek, Nicolas Figueira, Nicolas GUILLAUME, Nicolle Helgers, Nidhi Jain, Niels Lange, Nikhil Chavan, Nilambar Sharma, Noam Eppel, notnownikki, odyssey, Omar Reiss, Omkar Bhagat, on, others, Ov3rfly, Paal Joachim Romdahl, palmiak, panchen, parbaugh, Parham Ghaffarian, Pascal Birchler, Pascal Casier, Paul Bearne, Paul Biron, Paul Paradise, Paul Schreiber, Perdaan, Peter Putzer, Peter Wilson, Petter Walbø Johnsgård, Pierre Saïkali, Pieter Daalder, Piyush Patel, poena, Pramod Jodhani, Prashant Baldha, Pratik K. Yadav, Pratik K. Yadav, precies, Presskopp, Presslabs, PressTigers, programmin, Punit Patel, Purnendu Dash, qcmiao, Rachel Baker, Rachel Cherry, Rachel Peter, Rafsun Chowdhury, Rahul Prajapati, Raja Mohammed, Ramanan, Rami Yushuvaev, Ramiz Manked, ramonopoly, RavanH, redcastor, remyvv, rensw90, rhetorical, Riad Benguella, Rian Rietveld, Richard Tape, Ricky Lee Whittemore, Rinku Y, Rishi Shah, Robbie, robdxw, Robert Anderson, Robin Cornett, Robin van der Vliet, Ryan McCue, Ryan Paul, Ryan Welcher, ryotsun, Sébastien SERRE, Saša, sagarnasit, Sami Ahmed Siddiqui, Sami Keijonen, Samuel Wood (Otto), sarah semark, Sayed Taqui, Scott Lee, Scott Reilly, Sean Hayes, Sebastian Kurzynoswki, Sebastian Pisula, Sergey Biryukov, Shamim Hasan, Shane Eckert, Sharaz Shahid, Shashwat Mittal, Shawn Hooper, sherwood, Shital Marakana, Shiva Poudel, Simon Prosser, Sjardo, skoldin, slilley, slushman, Sonja Leix, sonjanyc, Soren Wrede, spartank, spyderbytes, Stanimir Stoyanov, Stanko Metodiev, stazdotio, Stephen Edgar, Stephen Harris, stevenlinx, Storm Rockwell, Stoyan Kostadinov, strategio, Subrata Sarkar, Sultan Nasir Uddin, swift, Takahashi Fumiki, Takayuki Miyauchi, Tammie Lister, Taylor Lovett, teddytime, Terri Ann, terwdan, tharsheblows, the, ThemeZee, Thomas Patrick Levy, Thomas Vitale, thomaswm, Thorsten Frommen, Thrijith Thankachan, Tiago Hillebrandt, tigertech, Tim Havinga, Tim Hengeveld, Timmy Crawford, Timothy Jacobs, titodevera, Tkama, to, Tobias Zimpel, Tom J Nowell, TomHarrigan, Tommy, tonybogdanov, Tor-Bjorn Fjellner, TorontoDigits, Toshihiro Kanai, Towhidul Islam, transl8or, Ulrich, upadalavipul, Usman Khalid, Utsav tilava, uttam007, Vaishali Panchal, Valérie Galassi, valchovski, vishaldodiya, vnsavage, voneff, warmlaundry, wbrubaker, Weston Ruter, who, Will Kwon, William Earnhardt, williampatton, wpcs, wpzinc, xhezairi, Yahil Madakiya, Yoav Farhi, Yui, YuriV, Zane Matthew, and zebulan.

Finally, thanks to all the community translators who worked on WordPress 5.1. Their efforts bring WordPress 5.1 fully translated to 34 languages at release time, with more on the way.

If you want to follow along or help out, check out Make WordPress and our core development blog.

Thanks for choosing WordPress!

WPTavern: WPWeekly Episode 346 – Cancer Sucks

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 20:56

In this episode, John James Jacoby and I reflect on Alex Mill’s latest blog post where he announced that he’s ending his battle with Leukemia. We highlight some of the impacts he’s had on people’s lives and the contributions he’s made to open-source software.

Stories Discussed:

Leukemia Has Won

Alex’s WordPress Plugins

WPWeekly Meta:

Next Episode: Wednesday, February 27th 3:00 P.M. Eastern

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Listen To Episode #346:

WPTavern: Gutenberg 5.1 Released with All Core Widgets Now Ported to Blocks

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 20:12

Gutenberg development continues ploughing ahead with new blocks and steady improvements to performance and accessibility. Version 5.1 was released this week with new Search, Calendar, and Tag Cloud blocks. All widgets have now been ported over to blocks, a major Phase 2 milestone. The next phase of that project will explore how the widgets screen will change in response to core widgets becoming blocks.

Version 5.1 also brings more polishes to existing blocks, introducing micro-animations for a smoother experience when hovering over menus or accessing the sidebar in the editor.

This release includes dozens of small stylistic improvements to blocks for a more consistent display, improvements to CSS specificity of styles, more options for the Quote block styling, improvements to using the editor on mobile devices, and lots of bug fixes. Documentation is also progressing with a new tutorial for working with editor notices, expanded JavaScript build tools documentation, and enhanced block edit/save documentation and code examples.

Gutenberg phase 2 technical lead Riad Benguella also included a table of benchmarks, showing the editor’s performance improvements since it was first released in WordPress 5.0. Each release of the plugin since then has significantly cut the loading time, and this is a noteworthy improvement to continue tracking.

These benchmarks compare performance for a post with approximately 36,000 words and 1,000 blocks. This isn’t an average post but large amounts of content help to reveal performance issues.

Gutenberg 5.1 had 51 contributors. For more details, check out the full list of enhancements and fixes in the release post.

WPTavern: The State of CSS 2019 Survey is Now Open

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 04:35

The makers of the annual State of JavaScript survey have launched a new survey for developers who work with CSS. In September 2018, Sacha Greif and his collaborators sent out the State of JS survey for the third year running but dropped the CSS libraries category in favor of keeping it from getting too long. The new State of CSS survey takes up this category and expands upon it.

The success of the State of JS survey has brought valuable information to the industry for developers, employers, startups, project maintainers, and even those who are just beginning their coding journey and wondering which frameworks are worth learning. The 2018 State of JS survey received more than 20,000 responses. Results showed that React was once again the most popular front-end framework and Vue.js received the highest satisfaction rating. The detailed results are influential in helping framework maintainers know how the development community perceives their projects.

I think Vue got the highest satisfaction rating among frameworks in State of JS this year (91.2%) – thanks to our users, and we aim to do even better! Hope we can change the mind of the 568 people who don’t want to use it again ;) https://t.co/7MrM8Y4ekq

— Evan You (@youyuxi) November 19, 2018

The new survey for CSS developers was created to help identify the latest trends in the rapidly changing CSS landscape. It includes the following topics:

  • CSS Features – Grid, Flexbox…
  • Tools – preprocessors, frameworks…
  • Environments – Browsers, devices…
  • Resources – Blogs, podcasts…
  • Opinions – How you feel about CSS
  • About You – Experience, salary…

The State of CSS Survey is powered by Typeform and all questions are optional. It is quick to scroll through and can take as little as 10 minutes to complete. Participants can leave their email to be notified when results are published.

WPTavern: New Wapuu Dashboard Pet Plugin Displays WordPress Site Health

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 02/20/2019 - 19:33

Wapuu Dashboard Pet is a new plugin from Kayleigh Thorpe and the team at WordPress hosting company 34SP.com. It is essentially a WordPress Tamagotchi, or digital pet, that resides in your dashboard and monitors the health of the site.

The plugin checks to make sure WordPress has been updated (plugins, themes, and core) and backups have run. Wapuu’s appearance will change based on these factors. Thorpe used her illustration skills to create the images, which indicate if wapuu is feeling dead, happy, sad, sick, or very sick. The threshold for a dead wapuu is 10+ updates. The example below is a “very sick” wapuu on a site with five or more updates pending.

After updating, the happy and healthy wapuu is displayed, as shown below.

The Wapuu Dashboard Pet is featured at the bottom of every page in the admin. It also comes with an option to enable weekly email notifications that will only send if wapuu is feeling sick (has one or more updates available). This feature can help site administrators who don’t log into their dashboards very often, resulting in more updated and secure WordPress sites.

The plugin is currently very effective in its simplicity but there are a lot of interesting features that its authors could add. It could be set up to check for PHP and MySQL versions, similar to what the Health Check plugin offers. It would also be useful if wapuu could detect whether or not any of the necessary updates are security-related, which might inspire administrators to act faster on the emails. There may be other useful applications for forks of this plugin, such as a wapuu that helps bloggers stay on track with their monthly posting goals.

When wapuu is feeling unwell, the image displayed is a pathetic-looking creature that appears to have been left out in the rain. Wapuu-conscious site admins will not be able to look at that image in the dashboard without feeling the need to improve wapuu’s condition. These visual indicators of site health may be just the type of prompt necessary for admins who have become desensitized to WordPress’ many update notifications.

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