Wordpress News

WPTavern: First Look at “Try Gutenberg” Prompt in WordPress 4.9.8 Beta 2

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 07/19/2018 - 21:48

WordPress 4.9.8 Beta 2 was released today, featuring the new “Try Gutenberg” prompt that will appear in user dashboards when the official release drops at the end of the month.

The prompt invites users to install Gutenberg if they want to try the new editor or install the Classic Editor to keep using the current editor until they are ready to make the change. WordPress contributors discussed variations on the design and wording of the callout and finally settled on what you see in 4.9.8 Beta 2.

Even if users don’t get involved in Gutenberg testing, the callout serves to inform them that the new editor will be enabled by default in the next major release of WordPress. It includes a link to the Gutenberg information page so users can learn more about the project.

Contributors agreed that they wanted to clearly communicate three important points in the callout, as per designer @kjellr’s suggestions on trac:

  1. Gutenberg is coming in the next major release.
  2. If you’re worried about compatibility, there’s a plugin to help ease the transition.
  3. The plugin lets you use the editor you’re used to until you’re ready to switch.

The prompt is clearly geared towards encouraging users to test Gutenberg, as that section has a more prominent, colored button. If your clients’ installations are not ready for users to act on the “Try Gutenberg” prompt, now is the time to install a plugin that will disable it. Clients with free-range of the WordPress admin, in sites that are running Gutenberg-compatible extensions, are better candidates for testing the new editor.

The Classic Editor Addon is one option that will suppress the prompt and automatically suppress Gutenberg when it ships in WordPress 5.0. It was also recently updated to auto-install the Classic Editor plugin as a dependency so users don’t have to install two plugins as part of the process.

A release candidate is slated for July 24, and the official 4.9.8 release is scheduled for July 31st. The Gutenberg plugin is currently sitting at 10,000+ active installations and the Classic Editor at 5,000+. After 4.9.8 is released, changes in these numbers will demonstrate how WordPress users across the globe are responding to the call for testing.

WPTavern: Insight Into How North Carolina State Is Preparing for Gutenberg

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 07/19/2018 - 00:27

Jennifer McFarland, the web services coordinator for the North Carolina State Office of Information Technology (OIT), recently did an interview with Technician, the official student newspaper of NC State University.

Since Gutenberg’s announcement in December of 2017, McFarland has published a series of articles on the NC State Office of Information Technology website educating staff and students on what to expect.

McFarland was asked how the team plans to help staff and students after Gutenberg ships with WordPress.

“A couple of times a year, we go and speak at various classes, professors will have us come out and do demos of WordPress,” McFarland told the Technician.

“We are expecting an uptake of people requesting us to come out and do a demo of WordPress or something like that, but generally our plan right now, at least for students, is mostly just offer the sort of self-help, like the video tutorials and things like that, and we figure that the students will mostly try and solve their own problems.”

Speaking of McFarland, she and Brian DeConinck presented on Gutenberg at WPCampus 2018. The videos from the event are still being processed but we’ll add a link to the presentation once it becomes available.

It’s pretty cool to see people in McFarland’s position in higher education already have a firm grasp of Gutenberg and doing what they can to ease the transition for staff and students



WPTavern: Meet Bernhard Kau, Local Lead Organizer of WordCamp Europe 2019 in Berlin

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 07/18/2018 - 20:18

Bernhard Kau, a WordPress developer, meetup organizer, and four-time organizer of WordCamp Berlin, is the local lead organizer for the next WordCamp Europe. Kau will join Milan Ivanović, the global lead, at the helm of WordCamp Europe in Berlin next June.

Kau submitted an application with his team to host WCEU and won out over a competing application from the WordPress community in Barcelona. The selection team cited Berlin’s accessibility, reasonable prices, and its strong community as the final deciding factors.

Berlin’s monthly WordPress meetups have 1,300 members. The community also holds dedicated meetups for beginners, developers, and women in WordPress. Five WordCamps have been organized in Berlin since 2010.

Attending #WPBerlin and they are already preparing WordPress community for next #WCEU pic.twitter.com/MWLwTZ4hrf

— Milan Ivanović (@lanche86) June 28, 2018

“Compared to other communities in Europe, we are a community that is very likely to travel to other cities to attend meetups and other WordCamps,” Kau said. “We usually only have one or two WordCamps per year in Germany but then usually all the German community members travel to that city to attend the WordCamp. Whereas in Spain, for example, they had 11 WordCamps this year that are more local and smaller. As a German community we are more used to traveling to a central place and meeting there.”

What to Expect at WCEU in Berlin: A Diverse Community, More Workshops, and a Unique After Party

The Estrel Hotel and Congress Center will host the entire event, including both conference days, the contributor day, and the after party. Although the venue has a max capacity of 12,000 people, Kau said organizers are planning for 2,500 – 3,000 attendees. The local team is excited to introduce the European WordPress community to their home city.

“Berlin is one of the most diverse cities in Europe,” Kau said. “When I prepared the application, I figured out that there are people from 191 countries living in Berlin. It’s a very international, very diverse city, so you can be just as you are and feel quite comfortable and welcome in Berlin.”

Kau said organizers intend to continue with workshops as a part of the event in 2019 but they are planning to make the signup experience more efficient.

“This was the first year we tried workshops,” Kau said. “We had three workshop tracks and workshops of 60 minutes, 90 minutes, and three hours. We are not sure how many workshops we want to have in Berlin. The idea was new but turned out quite well. There were workshops with many people waiting to get in and from what I’ve heard it was quite good.”

Kau said he wants to improve the process for workshops, because there was no easy way for attendees to sign up and managing waiting lists was a lot of manual work for the content team. This is one bottleneck from the most recent WCEU experience that he hopes to rectify.

“There is also something special planned but I don’t want to spoil it,” Kau said. “It’s going to be a very unique after party to say the least.” Although Berlin is renowned for its legendary nightlife, Kau said he doesn’t anticipate the party lasting all night.

“We’re probably not going to make it Berlin-typical until 10 in the morning but it’s going to be a bit longer than maybe here [Belgrade] or in Paris where people were kicked at at 3:30,” he said.

The call for applications for organizers is still open. Within 24 hours of announcing Berlin as the next host city, the team had already received 27 applications. The application window closes July 31, 2018.

Check out the full interview below to learn more about the German WordPress community and what they have planned for WCEU 2019.

WPTavern: WP-CLI Hack Day Friday, July 20th

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 07/18/2018 - 16:47

WP-CLI or WordPress Command Line Interface has become an integral tool for developers to launch and manage sites. To encourage new contributors to the project, Alain Schlesser is organizing the first WP-CLI Hack Day, Friday, July 20th beginning at 08:00 CEST.

Schlesser and other contributors will be available in the WP-CLI Slack channel all day and on the project’s GitHub site to answer questions and help people contribute to the project.

From 16:00-18:00 CEST, Schlesser will host a video call that’s open to everyone where people can join in, discuss issues, and visually work through pull requests. The goal is to reach 20 pull requests that have been merged during the event. A post on Make/CLI  blog will be published once WP-CLI Hack Day concludes summarizing any progress that was made.

To prepare prospecting contributors for the event, Schlesser has published a detailed guide on how to contribute to WP-CLI.

Folks can follow along on Twitter using the hashtag #hackwpcli. If Hack CLI Day is successful, more events will likely be created in the future to cover more time zones.

HeroPress: Making A Safe Place

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 07/18/2018 - 08:00

Being a remote worker makes it easy to hide from a world that you find scary or dangerous. If you’re never in the presence of other people they can’t hit you. Retreat becomes so easy. Marius Jensen from Sola, Norway grew up in a society that did not care for him, and made him want to hide from the world forever.

The WordPress community gave him a safe place to talk to people online, and after time, in person. WordCamps became a place of safety and compassion. This isn’t the case for all people, but it is for many people, in many places. Check out Marius’ essay from last July, about finding a safe place.

Becoming Myself Again

The post Making A Safe Place appeared first on HeroPress.

WPTavern: iThemes Enters the Hosting Space

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 07/17/2018 - 23:19

iThemes is getting into the hosting business after launching three plans that take advantage of its relationship with Liquid Web. The plans are finely tuned around the company’s products and come with free SSL certificates.

I reached out to Cory Miller, Founder of iThemes to figure out why they’ve entered the hosting space, what it means to be able to control the user experience of their products from the top-down, and how their plans compare to those from hosts that offer Jetpack Premium.

Interview With Cory Miller

What does it mean for you and iThemes to be able to control the user experience from the top-down?

In short, it means a better overall experience for our customers. For more than 10 years, we’ve dealt with most of the hosts, especially the ones offering catered WordPress offerings, and it has been a terribly frustrating experience for us trying to troubleshoot problems and help our mutual customers.

Additionally, we’ve long said you have to have two things to be our customer: WordPress and web hosting. Now we install WordPress for you, along with SSL, essentially with a click on our own hosting.

How would you compare iThemes hosting packages to hosts that offer Jetpack Premium services as part of their plans?

The thing that sticks out for me is having everything under one brand and team. But we think using iThemes Sync Pro as the hosting control panel gives us a significant edge for our customers to do more with their WP sites, in particular, our reporting features in Sync Pro.

Now our customers can get WP backups, security, site management and in-depth reporting all from one dashboard, along with their hosting. With our Business plan, they get BackupBuddy, our WordPress backup plugin; iThemes Security Pro, our WordPress security plugin & iThemes Sync Pro all in one. Plus they get an awesome team of WordPress pros for support if they need help or have any issues.

What are you most looking forward too offering these hosting packages specifically tuned for iThemes products and WordPress?

The actual implementation of the vision of offering the key essentials we think people want and need, along with a roadmap to do more, from our team at iThemes. It was one of the motivators for joining the Liquid Web family — the ability to finally do what we’ve always wanted to do for our customers, offering a more complete experience for them, from us.

Were there any challenges that you overcame when putting these packages together?

The main one that comes to mind is trying to ensure we offer what people actually want and will buy. But there was several months of hard work by our team and others to get this launched. Some long nights to pull all the pieces together in order to do this, with many more to come.

Prices range from $15 per month to $25 per month billed on an annual basis. New customers can take advantage of a coupon code on the site to purchase the Business plan, normally $25 for $15.

WPTavern: WooCommerce Custom Product Tables Plugin Now in Beta, Boasts 30% Faster Page Loads

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 07/17/2018 - 20:20

WooCommerce is celebrating 10th years of Woo this week. Over the past several years WooCommerce has grown to become a dominant player among e-commerce solutions on the web. E-commerce Usage Distribution stats from BuiltWith currently rank WooCommerce as the most commonly used platform for stores in the top 1 million sites.

Performance and scalability were the main focuses for the WooCommerce development team last year and these issues continue to be top priority. Version 3.0, released in April 2017, included significant performance improvements when WooCommerce switched from post meta to taxonomies for features like product visibility, featured products, and out of stock products. It also introduced CRUD (Create, Read, Update, Delete) classes for developers, making it easier to write and retrieve data from the database with less code.

Building on the CRUD work done last year, WooCommerce has just announced the beta of its new Custom Products Tables plugin. It replaces the WooCommerce product Data Store with new, dedicated product tables for significant reductions in page load time across shop, checkout, and admin pages.

“The results, so far, have been great – with improvements of up to 30% on page load times!” WooCommerce engineer Gerhard Potgieter said. “Checkout, arguably the most important part of the store experience, has seen the biggest performance gains.”

The WooCommerce development team tested the plugin’s impact on performance using two identical stores running the Storefront theme and no additional plugins. They created a data set of 500 products using the WooCommerce Smooth Generator, and both stores had 70,000 orders in the database and meta data in the range of 1.4 million rows.

image credit: WooCommerce Development Blog

The Custom Product Tables plugin is not ready for use in production but developers can download version 1 and test it against WooCommerce 3.5 dev (switch to the master branch).

Getting the plugin rolled into WooCommerce core is an exciting update on the horizon, as faster page loads generally improve conversion for store owners. WooCommerce engineers anticipate releasing the plugin on WordPress.org as the next step. They plan to include the new product tables in a major version update early next year.

WPTavern: New WordPress Feature Plugin Adds Support for Progressive Web Apps

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 07/17/2018 - 00:16

WordPress contributors are working on getting support for Progressive Web Apps (PWA) into core. A new PWA feature plugin is now available on WordPress.org, spearheaded by the teams at XWP, Google, and Automattic.

Progressive Web Apps are applications that run on the web but provide a speedy app-like experience inside a mobile browser. Google describes them as having the following three qualities:

  • Reliable – Load instantly and never show the downasaur, even in uncertain network conditions
  • Fast – Respond quickly to user interactions with silky smooth animations and no janky scrolling
  • Engaging – Feel like a natural app on the device, with an immersive user experience

The plugin adds support for technologies that PWAs require, including Service Workers, a Web App Manifest, and HTTPS. These technologies support functions like background syncing, offline content, push notifications, mobile home screen icon, and other PWA features.

XWP CTO Weston Ruter said the purpose of the feature plugin is to curate PWA capabilities for proposed merging into core. The idea is to merge them piece by piece. Core tickets are already in process for adding support for web app manifests and support for service workers, as well as bringing improvements to HTTPS.

“This PWA feature plugin is intended to equip and facilitate other plugins which implement PWA features,” Ruter said. “It’s not intended to negate any existing plugins with these features, but rather to allow such plugins (and themes) to work together seamlessly and expand upon them.”

The first release of the plugin on WordPress.org (v0.1.0) adds support for web app manifests and initial support for allowing theme and plugin developers to register scripts for service workers via wp_register_service_worker(). It also includes an API for detecting whether HTTPS is available.

“A next step for service workers in the PWA feature plugin is to integrate Workbox to provide a declarative WordPress PHP abstraction for managing the caching strategies for routes, with support for detecting conflicts,” Ruter said. Anyone who is interested to contribute to PWA support for WordPress can check out the discussions and plugin on GitHub.

In the past, app-like experiences were only available for sites and services that had their own native mobile apps, but native apps can be costly to develop and maintain. Progressive web apps use the greater web as their platform and are quick to spin up. They make content easier to access on mobile even without an internet connection. It’s also far easier to tap a home screen icon than to enter a URL on mobile, and this makes users more likely to engage with their favorite sites.

PWA Stats is a site that features case studies of progressive web apps that have significantly increased performance, engagement, and conversion. A few compelling examples include:

PWA support in WordPress will enable the plugin and theme ecosystems to work together in providing site owners with more engaging ways to connect with their visitors. Once the market starts building on core support, site owners should soon be able to offer better experiences for mobile users without having to become experts in the technologies that power progressive web apps.

Mediteran administrator

Drupal Themes - Mon, 07/16/2018 - 15:23

Mediteran administrator is responsive theme for Drupal 8 with clean and modern design. It is optimized for mobile, tablet and desktop screens. Mediteran is based on Drupal's blue color palette.

Features:

  • Mobile-friendly
  • No dependencies of other theme
  • Compatible with Admin Toolbar
  • Currently optimized for LTR layout

Installation:
Just install it like any other theme and set it as administrator theme.

Recommended Modules:
Admin Toolbar intends to improve the default Drupal Toolbar (the administration menu at the top of your site) to transform it into a drop-down menu, providing a fast access to all administration pages.

Dev Blog: Quarterly Updates | Q2 2018

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 07/16/2018 - 14:50

To keep everyone aware of big projects and efforts across WordPress contributor teams, I’ve reached out to each team’s listed representatives. I asked each of them to share their Top Priority (and when they hope for it to be completed), as well as their biggest Wins and Worries. Have questions? I’ve included a link to each team’s site in the headings.

Accessibility
  • Contacted: @rianrietveld, @joedolson, @afercia
  • Priority: Working to make sure that Gutenberg is reasonably accessible prior to merge. ETA is before 5.0
  • Struggle: Lack of developers and accessibility experts to help test and code the milestone issues. The team is doing outreach to help solve this problem.
  • Big Win: Interest from companies like The Paciello Group and Tenon.io to help out with Gutenberg code review and testing tools.
CLI
  • Contacted: @danielbachhuber, @schlessera
  • Priority: Very first global Hack Day is coming up July 20. Version 2.0.0 is still in progress (new ETA is end of July).
  • Struggle: The team continues to need new contributors. The current team is tiny but tough.
  • Big Win: WP-CLI is currently one of the project’s four main focuses, as mentioned in the Summer Update at WordCamp Europe.
Community
  • Contacted: @francina, @hlashbrooke
  • Priority: Focusing on smoothing out the processes in our community management by building up our team of volunteers and establishing what tools we need to keep things running well. ETA is ongoing.
  • Struggle: Our two biggest struggles at the moment are tracking what we need to get done, and making final decisions on things. There is current work on the tools available to assist with tracking progress.
  • Big Win: After making a concerted effort to get more contributors on the Community Team, we now have a much larger group of volunteers working as deputies and WordCamp mentors
Core
  • Contacted: @jeffpaul
  • Priority: Following the WordCamp Europe summer update (and the companion post here), the team is getting Gutenberg (the new WordPress editing experience) into a strong state for the 5.0 release. Potential ETA as soon as August.
  • Struggle: Coordinating momentum and direction as we start seeing more contributors offering their time. Still working our way through open issues. The team is starting multiple bug scrubs each week to work through these more quickly and transparently.
  • Big Win: Had a sizable release in 4.9.6 which featured major updates around privacy tools and functionality in Core.
Design
  • Contacted: @melchoyce, @karmatosed, @boemedia, @joshuawold, @mizejewski
  • Priority: Better on-boarding of new contributors, especially creating better documentation. ETA is end of July.
  • Struggle: It’s hard to identify reasonably small tasks for first-time contributors.
  • Big Win: The team is much more organized now which has helped clear out the design backlog, bring in new contributors, and also keep current contributors coming back. Bonus: Joshua Wold will co-lead the upcoming release.
Documentation
  • Contacted: @kenshino
  • Priority: Opening up the work on HelpHub to new contributors and easing the onboarding process. No ETA.
  • Struggle: Some blockers with making sure the code and database can be ready to launch on https://wordpress.org/support/
  • Big Win: The first phase of HelpHub creation is complete, which means content updates (current info, more readable, easier discovery), internal search, design improvements, and REST API endpoints.
Hosting
  • Contacted: @mikeschroder, @jadonn
  • Priority: Preparing hosts for supporting Gutenberg, especially support questions they’re likely to see when the “Try Gutenberg” callout is released. ETA July 31st, then before WordPress 5.0
  • Struggle: Most contributions are still made a by a small team of volunteers. Seeing a few more people join, but progress is slow.
  • Big Win: New team members and hosting companies have joined the #hosting-community team and have started contributing.
Marketing
  • Contacted: @bridgetwillard
  • Priority: Continuing to write and publish case studies from the community. ETA is ongoing.
  • Struggle: No current team struggles.
  • Big Win: Wrote and designed a short Contributor Day onboarding card. It was used at Contributor Day at WCEU and onboarding time went down to 1 hour instead of 3 hours.
Meta (WordPress.org Site)
  • Contacted: @tellyworth, @coffee2code
  • Priority: Reducing manual work around the contributor space (theme review, GDPR/privacy, plugin review). ETA for small wins is end of quarter, larger efforts after that.
  • Struggle: Maintaining momentum on tickets. There are also some discussions about updating the ticket management process across teams that use the Meta trac system.
  • Big Win: The new About page launched and has been translated across most locale sites.
Mobile
  • Contacted: @elibud
  • Priority: Getting Gutenberg in the mobile applications. ETA is late December.
  • Struggle: Consuming the Gutenberg source in the ReactNative app directly. More info can be found here: https://make.wordpress.org/mobile/2018/07/09/next-steps-for-gutenberg-mobile/
  • Big Win: The WordPress mobile applications now fully support right-to-left languages and are compliant with the latest standards for accessibility.
Plugins
  • Contacted: @ipstenu
  • Priority: Clearing ~8,000 unused plugins from the queues. Likely ETA is September.
  • Struggles: Had to triage a lot of false claims around plugins offering GDPR compliance.
  • Big Win: Released 4.9.6 and updated expectations with plugin authors. Huge thanks to the Core Privacy team for their hard work on this.
Polyglots
  • Contacted: @petya, @ocean90, @nao, @chantalc, @deconf, @casiepa
  • Priority: Keep WordPress releases translated to 100% and then concentrate on the top 100 plugins and themes. ETA is ongoing.
  • Struggle: Getting new PTEs fast enough, and complex tools/systems. Overall, the volume of strings awaiting approval.
Support
  • Contacted: @clorith
  • Priority: Getting ready for the Gutenberg callout (it got pushed last quarter). Needing a better presence on the official support forums, and outreach for that is underway, ETA end of July. 
  • Struggle: Keeping contributors participating post-contributor days/drives. Considering the creation of a dedicated post-contributor day survey to get some insight here.
  • Big Win: The increase in international liaisons joining for weekly meetings, helping bring the wider support community together.
Theme Review Tide
  • Contacted: @valendesigns (but usually @jeffpaul)
  • Priority: Storing PHPCompatibilty results inside the WordPress.org API and building a UI to display those results, an endpoint to request an audit is required for this work to continue.
  • Struggle: Development has dramatically slowed down while team members are on leave or pulled into internal client work.
  • Big Win: Migration to Google Cloud Platform (GCP) from Amazon Web Services (AWS) is complete and the audit servers have all been rewritten in Go. (This allows us to be faster with greater capacity and less cost.)
Training
  • Contacted: @bethsoderberg, @juliek
  • Priority: Lesson plan production. ETA is ongoing.
  • Struggle: The workflow is a little complex, so recruiting and training enough contributors to keep the process moving is a struggle.
  • Big Win: WordCamp Europe’s Contributor Day was very productive. New tools/workflow are in place and two team representatives were there to lead and help.

Interested in updates from the first quarter of this year? You can find those here: https://make.wordpress.org/updates/2018/04/24/quarterly-updates-q1-2018/

Quarterly Updates | Q2 2018

Wordpress News - Mon, 07/16/2018 - 14:50

To keep everyone aware of big projects and efforts across WordPress contributor teams, I’ve reached out to each team’s listed representatives. I asked each of them to share their Top Priority (and when they hope for it to be completed), as well as their biggest Wins and Worries. Have questions? I’ve included a link to each team’s site in the headings.

Accessibility
  • Contacted: @rianrietveld, @joedolson, @afercia
  • Priority: Working to make sure that Gutenberg is reasonably accessible prior to merge. ETA is before 5.0
  • Struggle: Lack of developers and accessibility experts to help test and code the milestone issues. The team is doing outreach to help solve this problem.
  • Big Win: Interest from companies like The Paciello Group and Tenon.io to help out with Gutenberg code review and testing tools.
CLI
  • Contacted: @danielbachhuber, @schlessera
  • Priority: Very first global Hack Day is coming up July 20. Version 2.0.0 is still in progress (new ETA is end of July).
  • Struggle: The team continues to need new contributors. The current team is tiny but tough.
  • Big Win: WP-CLI is currently one of the project’s four main focuses, as mentioned in the Summer Update at WordCamp Europe.
Community
  • Contacted: @francina, @hlashbrooke
  • Priority: Focusing on smoothing out the processes in our community management by building up our team of volunteers and establishing what tools we need to keep things running well. ETA is ongoing.
  • Struggle: Our two biggest struggles at the moment are tracking what we need to get done, and making final decisions on things. There is current work on the tools available to assist with tracking progress.
  • Big Win: After making a concerted effort to get more contributors on the Community Team, we now have a much larger group of volunteers working as deputies and WordCamp mentors
Core
  • Contacted: @jeffpaul
  • Priority: Following the WordCamp Europe summer update (and the companion post here), the team is getting Gutenberg (the new WordPress editing experience) into a strong state for the 5.0 release. Potential ETA as soon as August.
  • Struggle: Coordinating momentum and direction as we start seeing more contributors offering their time. Still working our way through open issues. The team is starting multiple bug scrubs each week to work through these more quickly and transparently.
  • Big Win: Had a sizable release in 4.9.6 which featured major updates around privacy tools and functionality in Core.
Design
  • Contacted: @melchoyce, @karmatosed, @boemedia, @joshuawold, @mizejewski
  • Priority: Better on-boarding of new contributors, especially creating better documentation. ETA is end of July.
  • Struggle: It’s hard to identify reasonably small tasks for first-time contributors.
  • Big Win: The team is much more organized now which has helped clear out the design backlog, bring in new contributors, and also keep current contributors coming back. Bonus: Joshua Wold will co-lead the upcoming release.
Documentation
  • Contacted: @kenshino
  • Priority: Opening up the work on HelpHub to new contributors and easing the onboarding process. No ETA.
  • Struggle: Some blockers with making sure the code and database can be ready to launch on https://wordpress.org/support/
  • Big Win: The first phase of HelpHub creation is complete, which means content updates (current info, more readable, easier discovery), internal search, design improvements, and REST API endpoints.
Hosting
  • Contacted: @mikeschroder, @jadonn
  • Priority: Preparing hosts for supporting Gutenberg, especially support questions they’re likely to see when the “Try Gutenberg” callout is released. ETA July 31st, then before WordPress 5.0
  • Struggle: Most contributions are still made a by a small team of volunteers. Seeing a few more people join, but progress is slow.
  • Big Win: New team members and hosting companies have joined the #hosting-community team and have started contributing.
Marketing
  • Contacted: @bridgetwillard
  • Priority: Continuing to write and publish case studies from the community. ETA is ongoing.
  • Struggle: No current team struggles.
  • Big Win: Wrote and designed a short Contributor Day onboarding card. It was used at Contributor Day at WCEU and onboarding time went down to 1 hour instead of 3 hours.
Meta (WordPress.org Site)
  • Contacted: @tellyworth, @coffee2code
  • Priority: Reducing manual work around the contributor space (theme review, GDPR/privacy, plugin review). ETA for small wins is end of quarter, larger efforts after that.
  • Struggle: Maintaining momentum on tickets. There are also some discussions about updating the ticket management process across teams that use the Meta trac system.
  • Big Win: The new About page launched and has been translated across most locale sites.
Mobile
  • Contacted: @elibud
  • Priority: Getting Gutenberg in the mobile applications. ETA is late December.
  • Struggle: Consuming the Gutenberg source in the ReactNative app directly. More info can be found here: https://make.wordpress.org/mobile/2018/07/09/next-steps-for-gutenberg-mobile/
  • Big Win: The WordPress mobile applications now fully support right-to-left languages and are compliant with the latest standards for accessibility.
Plugins
  • Contacted: @ipstenu
  • Priority: Clearing ~8,000 unused plugins from the queues. Likely ETA is September.
  • Struggles: Had to triage a lot of false claims around plugins offering GDPR compliance.
  • Big Win: Released 4.9.6 and updated expectations with plugin authors. Huge thanks to the Core Privacy team for their hard work on this.
Polyglots
  • Contacted: @petya, @ocean90, @nao, @chantalc, @deconf, @casiepa
  • Priority: Keep WordPress releases translated to 100% and then concentrate on the top 100 plugins and themes. ETA is ongoing.
  • Struggle: Getting new PTEs fast enough, and complex tools/systems. Overall, the volume of strings awaiting approval.
Support
  • Contacted: @clorith
  • Priority: Getting ready for the Gutenberg callout (it got pushed last quarter). Needing a better presence on the official support forums, and outreach for that is underway, ETA end of July. 
  • Struggle: Keeping contributors participating post-contributor days/drives. Considering the creation of a dedicated post-contributor day survey to get some insight here.
  • Big Win: The increase in international liaisons joining for weekly meetings, helping bring the wider support community together.
Theme Review Tide
  • Contacted: @valendesigns (but usually @jeffpaul)
  • Priority: Storing PHPCompatibilty results inside the WordPress.org API and building a UI to display those results, an endpoint to request an audit is required for this work to continue.
  • Struggle: Development has dramatically slowed down while team members are on leave or pulled into internal client work.
  • Big Win: Migration to Google Cloud Platform (GCP) from Amazon Web Services (AWS) is complete and the audit servers have all been rewritten in Go. (This allows us to be faster with greater capacity and less cost.)
Training
  • Contacted: @bethsoderberg, @juliek
  • Priority: Lesson plan production. ETA is ongoing.
  • Struggle: The workflow is a little complex, so recruiting and training enough contributors to keep the process moving is a struggle.
  • Big Win: WordCamp Europe’s Contributor Day was very productive. New tools/workflow are in place and two team representatives were there to lead and help.

Interested in updates from the first quarter of this year? You can find those here: https://make.wordpress.org/updates/2018/04/24/quarterly-updates-q1-2018/

Store Zymphonies Theme

Drupal Themes - Sun, 07/15/2018 - 19:00

Store Zymphonies Theme is our Mobile-first Drupal 8 responsive theme. This theme features a custom sideshow, responsive layout, multiple column layouts and is highly customizable. Read more

Live Demo Advanced Themes

Follow us in Twitter & Like us on Facebook to get free/premium theme updates, Drupal tips, tricks & news

Theme designed by FreeBiezz.com & developed by Zymphonies.com

Features

  • Drupal 8 core
  • Bootstrap v4
  • Font Awesome v5
  • Mobile-first responsive theme
  • Custom menu bar
  • Light weight theme
  • Fully responsive design
  • Quick informations in header
    • User login details
    • Social media links
  • Included Sass & Compass source file
    • Colors are stored in Sass variable
    • Well organized Sass code
  • Custom sideshow - Unlimited image upload
Slider/Banner Configuration

Slider can configure completely from theme settings page. It has control to specify no of required slides, upload image, add title and description etc.

Connect with Zymphonies Contact Zymphonies

Have Queries? Click here to contact Zymphonies

  • Free theme customization & additional features
  • Drupal custom theme development
  • Drupal website design & development
  • Drupal website migration

Sponsored by Zymphonies

zAdmin

Drupal Themes - Sun, 07/15/2018 - 13:23

Bootstrap3 based admin theme

WPTavern: WordCamp Europe 2018 Draws 2,085 Attendees, Organizers Look Ahead to 2019 in Berlin

Wordpress Planet - Sat, 07/14/2018 - 00:24
photo credit: WCEU Photography Team

WordCamp Europe closed out a successful event in Belgrade with 2,085 attendees from 76 countries. More than 800 others joined via livestream for a total audience of nearly 3,000 participants. A record-setting Contributor Day kicked off the event, followed by two days of conference sessions and workshops from 65 speakers.

A team of 54 organizers and 170 volunteers made WCEU possible, with 10 different organizing teams. Last year WordCamp Europe added a PR team and this year the event introduced an Attendee Services team to fill gaps in the organization. The operation ran smoothly, despite the conference being spread out across many rooms in the sprawling Sava Centar venue.

WordCamp Europe’s PWA (progressive web app) was the highlight of the new features and services introduced this year. It was a central hub for keeping attendees informed on what was happening at any given moment. Organizers also added new amenities, including a site health check station, Community Room, and info booth to handle attendee questions.

Gutenberg and Progressive web apps were the hot topics of this year’s WordCamp Europe. In addition to Matt Mullenweg unveiling a roadmap for Gutenberg’s inclusion in core, a strong contingent of designers and engineers from the team were present to educate attendees on Gutenberg’s architecture and the vision behind the project.

Many attendees were visiting Serbia for the first time and Belgrade delivered with its renowned hospitality and captivating nightlife. Attendees found no shortage of delicious options for food and drink.

Berlin to Host WordCamp Europe 2019

At the conclusion of the event, organizers announced Berlin as the next host city for WordCamp Europe, June 20-22, 2019. The conference, Contributor Day, and the after party will all be held at the Estrel Hotel and Congress Center, a venue with a capacity for 12,000 attendees.

Organizers said that Berlin’s accessibility, reasonable prices, and strong community were the final deciding factors for its selection as the next host city.

Behind the Scenes at WordCamp Europe 2018 with Lead Organizers Jenny Beaumont and Milan Ivanović

Hosting a volunteer-led event at this scale requires an enormous amount of effort from the organizers, especially those taking the lead for multiple years in a row. There is nearly no down time as the team is already planning for the next edition of the camp.

I sat down with lead organizers Jenny Beaumont, the global lead, and Milan Ivanović, the local lead, to get a look behind the scenes at what is involved in bringing WordCamp Europe to thousands of WordPress enthusiasts in one weekend. We interviewed them at the conclusion of WCEU 2017 in Paris. Over the past two years these leaders have developed a strong working relationship built on encouraging each other and keeping a positive outlook for their teams.

Beaumont said she was hesitant going into a third year for this role, as Paris was the project that captured her heart and motivation. After going through this event as the global lead, she said she discovered what she could bring to the role and how she could serve the team.

“The event has been their project,” Beaumont said. “My project this year has been the team, how I can really concentrate on this team, on its growth, on its health, on its sustainability. That’s what I learned in Paris – the importance of making sure that was part of the project.”

Beaumont and Ivanović explained the difference between the global and local lead roles, a structure that works well for flagship WordCamps.

“The local team is really about making it a good experience in this new place that everybody is going to be discovering for the first time,” Beaumont said. “It’s the hard work, it’s the logistics, it’s all of the small details, everything that’s behind the scenes that make it so you walk in as an attendee and it just feels like you’re at home. They do all of that hard work. The global role, as it has evolved, is really about being that sort of team care-giver, making sure that there is good communication happening, making sure the team is healthy and happy and motivated. Because you’ve got to get up and do this every day while you’re also doing your day job, and that takes a lot.”

WordCamp Europe had a strong impact on the local community with more than 400 Serbian attendees and 20 Serbian organizers. They worked to build awareness of WordPress in the local community ahead of the event.

“We used this event to grow our community and used our community to promote the event,” Ivanović said. “When we announced last year in Paris that Belgrade is going to be next, at that time we had five or six cities for WordPress meetups. Currently, we are in 14 cities and starting the 15th in July. WordCamp Europe and the conference itself was such a win for the whole community.”

Ivanović will return next year as the global lead for WCEU in Berlin. Beaumont is taking some time off after three years organizing WordCamp Paris and WordCamp Europe, but she hopes to return in some capacity in the future. They are working together with their team to publish a WordCamp Europe handbook that covers some of the important specifics of the event for upcoming teams. Check out the full interview in the video below.

Nitty Gritty Bootstrap Starter Theme

Drupal Themes - Fri, 07/13/2018 - 10:13
NittyGritty is a bootstrap starter theme for Drupal 8

Download from Github Project

Features
  • Gulp, combines and minifies styles and js
  • Bootstrap 4 (SCSS source + space for your own Bootstrap variables and styles)
  • Fontawesome
  • BrowserSync
  • Imagemin
  • Twig
Thank you

This theme consists partially of work and ideas of:

  • Atlas Starter Theme for Drupal 8 by John Hannah
  • Understrap Wordpress Theme by Holger Koenemann and his contributors
Installation

Next, install dependencies using npm by running the following command in the root of your theme folder:

Perform the classic Drupal 8-ish theme installation and activate it
Open your terminal and navigate to {YOUR_DRUPAL_ROOT}/themes/nitty-gritty-theme
Run npm install, gulp copy-assets will beperformed automatically, so you don't have to

Usage

You can also watch for any changes to your files by running:

gulp watch gulp watch-bs gulp copy-assets

Put your custom Bootstrap variables into /sass/theme/_theme_variables.scss
Put your custom styles into /sass/theme/_theme.scss
Put your custom js into /src/js/custom-javascript.js
License
GNU GPL version 2

WPTavern: Array Launches Free Gutenberg-Ready Atomic Blocks Theme on WordPress.org

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 07/12/2018 - 22:33

Mike McAlister and the team at Array Themes have fully embraced Gutenberg and are one of the first shops on the scene with a free WordPress theme designed specifically to work with the new editor. The Atomic Blocks theme is now available on WordPress.org with minimal styling and seamless support for all core content and media blocks.

The theme allows users to control the width of the content area to create full-screen posts and pages. It supports full-screen images, videos, and galleries, showcasing the new editor’s wide alignment styles for content. Atomic Blocks includes Customizer options for uploading a logo, customizing the font style, setting body and title font sizes, and selecting an accent color.

Check out the theme’s demo to see the blocks in action: https://preview.arraythemes.com/atomicblocks.

The theme also seamlessly supports McAlister’s new Atomic Blocks project, a collection of page-building blocks included in the accompanying Atomic Blocks plugin. It currently includes blocks for creating a post grid, call-to-action, testimonials, inline notices, sharing icons, author profiles, accordions, customizable buttons, drop caps, and spacer/dividers, with many more blocks planned.

“I knew Gutenberg was going to be a game changer from the second I saw it and started hashing out product ideas in October 2017,” McAlister said. “To me, it felt like a very natural evolution and transition for WordPress into a more forward-thinking content creator. All of the tools outside of WordPress are evolving and becoming better and easier to use and WordPress is starting to feel quite dated in comparison.”

McAlister said his team is building Atomic Blocks into a full-fledged content block solution that will include a commercial version in the future.

“We have a long list of blocks that we’ll be releasing into the plugin in the coming months — everything from eCommerce to email marketing to full-page layouts,” he said. “There will definitely be a commercial version of the plugin for those extra awesome blocks that will take your site to the next level.”

McAlister is keeping Atomic Blocks separate from Array Themes but plans to cross promote between the two. He also plans to update the Array themes collection to support the blocks found in the plugin.

“Atomic Blocks aims to solve a different problem in a different way than the traditional WordPress themes you’ll find on Array,” McAlister said. “By launching it separately from Array Themes, it gave me the opportunity to diversify my projects a bit and create a dedicated marketing stream for a Gutenberg solution.”

Many products in the Array Themes catalog are already working with the new editor, but McAlister and his team intend to provide more in-depth support for specific Gutenberg features in themes where appropriate.

“We’ve stayed fiercely committed to beautiful design, simplicity, and core coding standards and practices to ensure wide-spread support and compatibility with our themes,” McAlister said. “While this has served us well, we are all ready for a core-supported solution to providing a better experience for our customers. Gutenberg will solve this problem by providing a cohesive, unified way of extending content creation with a core user interface. Gutenberg is quite extensible as is, and will only grow more capable with time.”

McAlister said one of the most challenging aspects of launching Atomic Blocks has been keeping pace with Gutenberg’s rapid development, requiring the team to follow multiple conversations across various WordPress core development discussion channels.

“I followed Gutenberg development closely during the second half of last year and then started developing Atomic Blocks for Gutenberg early this year,” McAlister said. “You have to follow the Github repo, Make blog posts, and Slack conversations closely to keep up with the changes, deprecations, and feature additions. Luckily, now that features are being frozen, the code is churning less and things are starting to stabilize.”

In order to keep up with all the news and changes, McAlister started the Gutenberg News site to collect helpful resources, tutorials, and code snippets he found. The site contains more than 200 links to resources for both beginners and developers.

McAlister predicts that Gutenberg will bring a greater separation between the roles of themes and plugins in the site-building experience.

“The demand for themes will certainly begin to change more drastically in the long term,” he said. “Traditional WordPress themes will still be desirable for a number of years, simply due to the number of sites out there and the solutions needed to build them. Eventually, much of what can be provided by a theme will be provided by blocks via a plugin instead. Themes will still be responsible for providing a degree of styling and functionality that will remain critical to the site-building experience, but they will take a secondary role to content blocks.”

Gutenberg will inevitably change the landscape of the theme industry, but McAlister sees it as a chance to reach customers in a new way.

“Theme designers and developers should be excited about this opportunity and not feel threatened by Gutenberg,” McAlister said. “This is a fantastic opportunity to learn a new set of skills, attract a new segment of customers, and start pivoting to a block-based product model.”

WPTavern: WPWeekly Episode 323 – Recap of WordCamp Grand Rapids and A Gutenberg Road Map

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 07/12/2018 - 00:42

In this episode, John James Jacoby recaps his trip to WordCamp Grand Rapids and shares his experience. WordCamp Grand Rapids had a strong focus on tools, plugins, and themes and by all accounts, was a successful event.

We discussed Matt Mullenweg’s Summertime update, the roadmap for merging Gutenberg into core, and what comes after Gutenberg. We shared our thoughts on Automattic’s new board member, General Ann Dunwoody and speculated on Automattic’s vision.

We wrap up the show by talking about generational divides in WordPress.

Stories Discussed:

WordPress 4.9.7 Security and Maintenance Release
Update on Gutenberg
What’s New in Gutenberg? (6th July)
Automattic’s First New Board Member: General Ann Dunwoody
Block Unit Test Plugin Helps WordPress Theme Developers Prepare for Gutenberg
Generational divides in WordPress

WPWeekly Meta:

Next Episode: Wednesday, July 18th 3:00 P.M. Eastern

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via Itunes

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via RSS

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via Stitcher Radio

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via Google Play

Listen To Episode #323:

WPTavern: Video: A Quick Introduction to Gutenberg and the New WordPress Block Editor from LinkedIn Learning

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 07/11/2018 - 23:04

Although WordPress developers and professionals have been inundated with Gutenberg news for more than a year, there’s a whole wide world of users who will learn about the project for the first time when 4.9.8 includes a “Try Gutenberg” prompt in the admin. If you haven’t been following the news closely and are wondering what all of this Gutenberg talk is about, Morten Rand-Hendriksen provides a succinct introduction to the new editor that is coming in WordPress 5.0.

The video was created as part of LinkedIn’s WordPress Essentials Training course. The first part explains the basic concept of a block and includes a mini tour of the new interface, followed by a short overview of where the Gutenberg project is going in the future.

WPTavern: WordCamp Ticket Sales Move from PayPal to Stripe for Default Payment Gateway

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 07/11/2018 - 18:02

The WordPress Community Team announced an update to the CampTix, the plugin used for selling WordCamp tickets, that makes Stripe the default payment method. The gateway was previously available as a beta plugin and could be enabled on a per-site basis but is now available to all WordCamps.

When proposing Stripe as the default payment gateway in April, Hugh Lashbrooke cited the fact that PayPal is entirely blocked and inaccessible in some countries. He also identified Stripe’s simpler UI and larger number of supported currencies as its chief advantages.

PayPal has been the default for years on WordCamp websites but it currently supports only 26 currencies. Stripe supports 136 currencies, allowing WordCamp organizers to offer ticket purchases in more places than before. Previously, some communities were forced to build a local gateway integration to sell WordCamp tickets via PayPal, requiring those sales to be inconveniently funneled through a local bank account. The Stripe gateway option is a welcome update to support WordPress’ growing international community, which held camps in 73 countries in 2017.

It’s important to note that Stripe isn’t fully replacing PayPal. The Camptix plugin allows organizers to activate multiple payment gateways for cases where one or both make more sense, retaining the flexibility to support ticket sales at camps with different payment requirements.

HeroPress: Translating For Love

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 07/11/2018 - 12:13

We all have our reasons for the things we do. Money, love, orders, etc. Vladimir Petkov started using WordPress because it solved a problem. As the years went by it continued to solve problems, and he continued to use it. His time to give back didn’t arrive until much later though.

His 7 year old daughter wanted a blog, and WordPress wasn’t completely translated into her language. So Vladimir learned how to translate WordPress, so his little girl (and every other Bulgarian speaker) can use their voice to speak to the world.

Why do you give back to WordPress? If you’d like more info about how you can (no coding required!) drop a note in the comments.

Also, check out Vladimir’s essay.

Rebirth

The post Translating For Love appeared first on HeroPress.

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