Wordpress News

Fills

Drupal Themes - Thu, 05/14/2020 - 02:39

This is a boostrap subtheme based in the background patterns design of the project patternFills

We get the patterns.css of the project and convert it to Sass mixin to apply to a blacka and white design.

A little extreme theme but may be someone like it.

This subtheme is based in Barrio theme

Post Status: On static WordPress, with Miriam Schwab of Strattic

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 05/13/2020 - 23:16

Miriam Schwab is co-founder and CEO of Strattic, a business making a big bet on the future of WordPress — and in particular for using it to create static websites.

They recently raised $6.5 million dollars in an oversubscribed round. Strattic aims to enable the power and flexibility of a dynamic WordPress website like we all know, with the security and speed of a completely static website.

In this interview, Cory Miller talks to Miriam about her journey to this moment, the Strattic product, raising money, and more.

Partner: Yoast

This episode is brought to you by Yoast, the best WordPress SEO solution, hands down. You can upgrade to Yoast SEO premium, or take advantage of their great bundles that include outstanding training resources so you can fully take advantage of all the awesome tools Yoast SEO provides.

WPTavern: Where Gutenberg Went Wrong: Theme Developer Edition

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 05/13/2020 - 20:19
Themes with block editor styles on WordPress.org.

With full-site editing just around the bend, it is a fair question to ask whether the WordPress ecosystem is prepared for such a transition, particularly on the theme development side of things.

It is no secret that theme developers have struggled to keep up with the barrage of changes between Gutenberg plugin updates and, ultimately, major WordPress versions. It is also a fair question to ask who is steering the ship. Where are the site developers, theme authors, and other designers who spend every day crafting the front end of the web? Where are the forward-thinking solutions that make sure the project maintains backward compatibility?

There have been some efforts to mend the broken divide between the Gutenberg project and theme developers such as the fortnightly block-based themes meetings. However, those meetings, by and large, are general updates on things the Gutenberg team has already developed or will ship soon. Those meetings are a good stepping stone toward better communication, but the project needs a project planner with both the vision of the future landscape and a sense of the day-to-day issues that theme authors contend with.

The reality is that there are only 132 themes out of 7,455 that list block editor styles as a feature in the official repository. We are a year and a half into the lifespan of the block editor officially merging into WordPress, yet the face of the platform is made up mostly of themes that have shoehorned some basic block styles into mediocre designs. The themes that truly stand out with full block-editor support are few and far between. Many of those are also bidding heavily on Elementor or other page builders.

Whether you like the block editor is of little consequence when there is no buy-in from theme authors. Every week, I check the theme directory for new themes, hoping to find a hidden gem. Every week, I am disappointed to see new themes dropping in 2020 with no support for the block editor. There is an entire segment of users who might enjoy the editor if only they had something more than Twenty Twenty to play around with — it is a fine theme but is not everyone’s cup of tea.

ThemeForest’s listing of block-styled themes.

ThemeForest sellers are besting free WordPress.org theme authors 18 to 1 in terms of support with over 2,300 themes listed as Gutenberg-optimized. Granted, themes from the massive marketplace are known to have every feature they can in an attempt to one-up the competition. Also, many of them either have built-in page builders or support third-party solutions.

Still, for the flagship feature of the platform, end-users should expect something more from the official theme directory. A third-party marketplace should not be the only game in town. At the moment, much of the offerings on WordPress.org feel lackluster at best. The handful that go the extra mile, such as the Rosa 2 and Go themes, have mature businesses funding the effort.

There is some broken trust between theme authors and WordPress at the moment. Some shout it loudly (as folks can attest from WP Tavern comments section). Others are more quietly trying to figure all this out.

Even Carolina Nymark, one of the representatives for the official Themes Team, shared some concern. “How do all of you theme authors keep up with the changes to Gutenberg?” she asked in a tweet. When the team leads are not up to speed, it is not good for the project as a whole.

“I don’t,” replied Anders Norén, the primary developer behind Twenty Twenty, to Nymark’s question. “I wait until something breaks (in the beta releases) and try to fix it then. Trying to support changes in the Gutenberg plugin while maintaining support for the block editor in Core is bad for your health.”

There is a major concern from theme authors about the future. It is hard to get excited about the current possibilities when there is uncertainty over what theme development will look like in 12 months. There is no clear and detailed roadmap about how things will work, and many theme designers feel like they are playing catchup from week to week. Instead, they should be able to more clearly look ahead and push early ideas into play.

My ultimate fear is that the Themes Team will one day flip the switch and require all themes going into the directory to support the block editor like it had to do with the customizer in 2015. If theme authors do not organically make the transition such a day may come. The team will be stuck as the bad guys in the middle.

Where Do We Go from Here?

It is easy to identify some of the major pain points for theme authors. Changes between updates will inevitably break something with the theme design.

Breaking HTML changes.

Breaking CSS changes.

Missing class names.

Different methods of handling alignment, depending on the block.

Dealing with inline styles after years of being taught to avoid them.

All of these issues are roadblocks for theme authors. And, when things get in the way of theme authors doing their jobs, they trickle down to end-users.

This is not the WordPress of the last decade. The WordPress that promised to not break things with updates. The WordPress where a one-off theme by a non-professional designer still worked four months later.

The Gutenberg project is still in its infancy. It can be fun to play with, but it can also be messy. I am as much of an evangelist for the block editor as anyone, but I can recognize when there is a clear and present issue of trust between theme authors and the developers of the project.

Currently, theme authors who are attempting to cover all of their bases are designing for at least a couple of versions of WordPress, multiple versions of Gutenberg, and the classic editor plugin. It is a dizzying array of testing for one theme. Those with a dozen or more themes…well, it is not an ideal situation.

A holistic approach needs to be taken toward theme and site design. Theme authors need to see the details of the roadmap and contribute to it, carving the features they see as relevant into stone for the coming years. They need to know that the buttons block design they sweated over for hours this past week will continue working next week.

It all starts at the project management level.

If a breaking HTML change needs to happen, theme authors need more than, “X change needs to happen for Y feature to work.” They need to see ownership of the mistake in the initial planning phase for X, backward-compatible code solutions, and a path toward fewer of the same mistakes happening.

Theme designers still need some sort of design framework. The current utility classes are like a poor man’s version of Tailwind that is being pieced together as the project adds new features without the foresight to look at the future landscape. Maybe the upcoming Global Styles feature can tackle that on a larger scale that provides compatibility across themes.

Ultimately, there needs to be more communication between the Gutenberg team and theme authors who are building themes for the official WordPress theme directory. Perhaps there should even be a new team or sub-team formed focused solely on theming in the block era and working directly with Gutenberg developers to identify pain points. Whatever happens, someone needs to inspire the next generation of themes into being. Until then, most theme authors are stuck wondering what they will need to fix next.

Up next: block/plugin development edition?

WPTavern: GitHub Adds Account Successors Feature

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 05/12/2020 - 22:51

Yesterday, GitHub added a new setting to user-owned repositories called “Account Successors.” It allows users to designate repository access to another user to maintain ownership continuity in the event of any kind of personal disruption.

“Open source maintainers, you can now invite a trusted user to manage your open source projects in the event that you are unable to do so yourself,” GitHub Senior Product Manager Ben Balter said in an announcement on Twitter. “Help ensure the future of your work (and the work of others) by inviting an account successor today.”

The new feature can be found under the Settings » Account » Successor Settings menu in GitHub. Successors will not be given the ability to log into accounts but will have the following permissions:

  • Archive your public repositories.
  • Transfer your public repositories to their own user owned account.
  • Transfer your public repositories to an organization where they can create repositories.

Successors cannot be set on a per-project or per-organization basis yet, but Balter said that is something GitHub would like to build.

This new setting complements GitHub’s Deceased User Policy, in which the company will work with the deceased person’s next of kin, a pre-designated successor, or other authorized individual to determine the future of the account.

GitHub began testing the Account Successors feature last week, taking suggestions from the greater community. Public feedback from testers has been positive so far. Users hope not to need the feature anytime soon, though some said it is a real worry they have regarding their projects on GitHub. Setting up a successor is now the easy part, where identifying a trusted individual may prove more difficult for some.

Account Successors is a timely addition to the platform, as the pandemic continues to sweep the globe, although the feature can be useful for many other types of scenarios. Given the high fevers that can accompany COVID-19 and the rapid decline often associated with the worst outcomes, identifying a successor while still feeling healthy is an important precaution to ensure the continuity of your project.

WPTavern: Highlight, Underline, and Control Font Size with RichText Extension

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 05/12/2020 - 19:51

Last week, Tetsuaki Hamano contributed his first plugin to the official WordPress plugin repository. RichText Extension grants additional options for inline text in the block editor.

RichText is a component in the editor that allows end-users to add and edit text. Typically, users may think of this component when dealing with paragraphs. However, it also applies to headings, lists, quotes, image captions, and any other area where textual content can be added.

Many plugins add settings on the block level. This means when you apply a particular style, it applies to the entire block. Inline text refers to the individual characters and words within the block. By default, WordPress allows end-users to control inline text by adding links, creating italic or bold characters, changing the text color, and more. Superscript and subscript inline options have already landed in the Gutenberg plugin, which should ship with WordPress 5.5.

RichText Extension extends the editor toolbar to add new options for highlighting, underlining, and changing the font size of inline text. It also adds an option to clear all formatting.

Overall, the plugin is a solid outing for a first-time contributor to the plugin directory. With luck, we will get to see more of Hamano’s work in the future.

Plugin Features

The primary feature of RichText Extension is its highlighter option, which allows users to highlight text. The plugin adds a paintbrush icon to the toolbar. Once clicked, it opens four highlighting options. By default, users can add a red or yellow marker effect or background directly behind a piece of text. This feature can be useful for adding a bit of flair to make specific words or characters to stand out.

Using the marker highlight in a pullquote.

The plugin also adds a font size option to the toolbar. I am unsure how useful changing the font size for inline text is for the average end-user. Typically, this is best left to the block level. However, there may be some edge cases that others will want to use it for.

Along with the core editor’s inline options in the toolbar’s dropdown menu, RichText extension adds Clear Format and Underline options. The former allows users to clear all inline formatting. The latter underlines text.

Each of the plugin’s features can be configured via the plugin’s settings screen. Users can change the highlight colors, their thickness, and transparency. The four available font sizes can be adjusted. It also allows users to enable or disable each feature.

RichText Extension’s settings screen.

It would be nice to see the plugin’s highlighting and font-size features use the theme-defined color palette and font sizes, respectively. The plugin could further allow users to define custom colors and sizes outside of those added by the theme.

More than anything, I would like to see a fully-featured plugin tackle every conceivable inline text option with the ability to enable or disable each. This would give end-users ultimate flexibility over how they write their content. Perhaps RichText Extension can be that plugin in the future. Otherwise, another developer may step in and do the job.

WPTavern: WordPress Accessibility Team to Host 24-Hour Online Event October 2, 2020

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 05/11/2020 - 20:17

The WordPress Accessibility Team is organizing a new online event called WP Accessibility Day that will take place on October 2, 2020. The event will feature 24 hours of educational sessions that focus on the intersection between WordPress and web accessibility.

Inspired by the Polyglots’ Global Translation Day, which greatly expanded the team’s base of contributors and fueled a record number of translations, the Accessibility Team aims to raise awareness about its work. Organizers will be featuring a variety of topics, including theme and plugin accessibility, writing accessible content, accessibility testing, current standards, and more from a diverse group of global speakers.

Accessibility consultant and WordPress contributor Joe Dolson proposed the event use a model similar to the ID24 (Inclusive Design 24) conference, with one 30-40 minute talk per hour. This format merges aspects of virtual WordCamps and WordSesh, running a single-track of sessions over the span of 24 hours with live emcees to manage interviews and Q&A segments.

Even though many events are going virtual due to the pandemic, accessibility contributors have been evaluating the possibility of hosting an online-only event since mid-2019 and have been planning this one since December. The small size of the team and the travel expenses associated with larger WordCamps made it nearly impossible to scale the in-person collaboration happening at events.

WP Accessibility Day has its own website where those who are interested can sign up to be notified about the call for speakers, sponsors, and other news. Organizers and volunteers are meeting in the #accessibility-events channel on WordPress’Slack. They will be discussing the event, along with other accessibility topics, during an online panel on Thursday, May 21st, 2020, for Global Accessibility Awareness Day.

WPTavern: WordPress Accessibility Team to Host 24-Hour Online Event October 2, 2020

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 05/11/2020 - 20:17

The WordPress Accessibility Team is organizing a new online event called WP Accessibility Day that will take place on October 2, 2020. The event will feature 24 hours of educational sessions that focus on the intersection between WordPress and web accessibility.

Inspired by the Polyglots’ Global Translation Day, which greatly expanded the team’s base of contributors and fueled a record number of translations, the Accessibility Team aims to raise awareness about its work. Organizers will be featuring a variety of topics, including theme and plugin accessibility, writing accessible content, accessibility testing, current standards, and more from a diverse group of global speakers.

Accessibility consultant and WordPress contributor Joe Dolson proposed the event use a model similar to the ID24 (Inclusive Design 24) conference, with one 30-40 minute talk per hour. This format merges aspects of virtual WordCamps and WordSesh, running a single-track of sessions over the span of 24 hours with live emcees to manage interviews and Q&A segments.

Even though many events are going virtual due to the pandemic, accessibility contributors have been evaluating the possibility of hosting an online-only event since mid-2019 and have been planning this one since December. The small size of the team and the travel expenses associated with larger WordCamps made it nearly impossible to scale the in-person collaboration happening at events.

WP Accessibility Day has its own website where those who are interested can sign up to be notified about the call for speakers, sponsors, and other news. Organizers and volunteers are meeting in the #accessibility-events channel on WordPress’Slack. They will be discussing the event, along with other accessibility topics, during an online panel on Thursday, May 21st, 2020, for Global Accessibility Awareness Day.

WPTavern: WordPress Accessibility Team to Host 24-Hour Online Event October 2, 2020

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 05/11/2020 - 20:17

The WordPress Accessibility Team is organizing a new online event called WP Accessibility Day that will take place on October 2, 2020. The event will feature 24 hours of educational sessions that focus on the intersection between WordPress and web accessibility.

Inspired by the Polyglots’ Global Translation Day, which greatly expanded the team’s base of contributors and fueled a record number of translations, the Accessibility Team aims to raise awareness about its work. Organizers will be featuring a variety of topics, including theme and plugin accessibility, writing accessible content, accessibility testing, current standards, and more from a diverse group of global speakers.

Accessibility consultant and WordPress contributor Joe Dolson proposed the event use a model similar to the ID24 (Inclusive Design 24) conference, with one 30-40 minute talk per hour. This format merges aspects of virtual WordCamps and WordSesh, running a single-track of sessions over the span of 24 hours with live emcees to manage interviews and Q&A segments.

Even though many events are going virtual due to the pandemic, accessibility contributors have been evaluating the possibility of hosting an online-only event since mid-2019 and have been planning this one since December. The small size of the team and the travel expenses associated with larger WordCamps made it nearly impossible to scale the in-person collaboration happening at events.

WP Accessibility Day has its own website where those who are interested can sign up to be notified about the call for speakers, sponsors, and other news. Organizers and volunteers are meeting in the #accessibility-events channel on WordPress’Slack. They will be discussing the event, along with other accessibility topics, during an online panel on Thursday, May 21st, 2020, for Global Accessibility Awareness Day.

WPTavern: WordPress Accessibility Team to Host 24-Hour Online Event October 2, 2020

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 05/11/2020 - 20:17

The WordPress Accessibility Team is organizing a new online event called WP Accessibility Day that will take place on October 2, 2020. The event will feature 24 hours of educational sessions that focus on the intersection between WordPress and web accessibility.

Inspired by the Polyglots’ Global Translation Day, which greatly expanded the team’s base of contributors and fueled a record number of translations, the Accessibility Team aims to raise awareness about its work. Organizers will be featuring a variety of topics, including theme and plugin accessibility, writing accessible content, accessibility testing, current standards, and more from a diverse group of global speakers.

Accessibility consultant and WordPress contributor Joe Dolson proposed the event use a model similar to the ID24 (Inclusive Design 24) conference, with one 30-40 minute talk per hour. This format merges aspects of virtual WordCamps and WordSesh, running a single-track of sessions over the span of 24 hours with live emcees to manage interviews and Q&A segments.

Even though many events are going virtual due to the pandemic, accessibility contributors have been evaluating the possibility of hosting an online-only event since mid-2019 and have been planning this one since December. The small size of the team and the travel expenses associated with larger WordCamps made it nearly impossible to scale the in-person collaboration happening at events.

WP Accessibility Day has its own website where those who are interested can sign up to be notified about the call for speakers, sponsors, and other news. Organizers and volunteers are meeting in the #accessibility-events channel on WordPress’Slack. They will be discussing the event, along with other accessibility topics, during an online panel on Thursday, May 21st, 2020, for Global Accessibility Awareness Day.

WPTavern: Simple Photoblogging with the Instapress WordPress Theme

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 05/11/2020 - 19:52

It is not often that I come across a free WordPress theme that instantly impresses me. Far too often, I spend half an hour or more just getting to know a theme, checking its options, and figuring out how long it will take to recreate something that looks remotely like the demo. However, every now and then I come across one of those diamonds in the rough that makes me a taker a deeper look.

Instapress is one of those themes. It is yet another reason I am in favor of a curated featured themes list. These types of unique themes tend to get lost in the crowd, and without the backing of a major company to market them, they usually go unnoticed by most WordPress users.

What drew me to Instapress was its take on presenting posts on the front end. It is a photoblogging theme that is mostly good at showing individual photos but little else. It also has some of the old-school simplicity from the early WordPress theme era.

Instapress is the first and only theme that Anton Lukin has submitted to the official WordPress theme directory. He runs the theme on his personal blog, in which he shares photos from the places he travels.

Beautiful Simplicity

The theme is truly a photoblogging-only theme. It is not ideal for long-form, textual content or many other types of sites. Fair warning: if your plan is to do anything other than post photos, you should look elsewhere.

This narrow design is what makes the theme stand out. On the blog page and other archive-type pages, the theme presents the featured image with an interesting JSON-style output of the post metadata such as the date, title, and author.

Posts page display from Instapress.

Instapress has a few customizer options. Along with a custom footer description, end-users can decide whether to show the post author and any custom meta in post summaries on blog and archive pages. Custom meta in this sense means all public custom fields, which may not be desirable for everyone, depending on what metadata is assigned to the post. However, it can be useful for photobloggers who include location data, such as latitude and longitude for their posts.

As shown in the following screenshot, Lukin includes the coordinates on his post (latlng):

Custom metadata from Baikal post.

Themes rarely get much simpler than Instapress. It is intentionally lightweight. The stylesheet comes in under 20 kb, which is what any photoblogger should look for in a theme. The theme should not be the bottleneck for page speed on image-heavy websites.

Areas to Improve

While being a fan of the theme, some small things could drastically improve its appeal to end-users. I would not want the theme to add too many extra options. Its simplicity is part of its charm. However, a couple of home/archive views that offer a wider photo layout or grid would add a nice touch without bloating the theme.

Typically, I would deduct massive points for a theme that has no block editor styles, particularly in 2020. It is such a huge user base to leave out. But, the biggest loss for this theme is not taking advantage of the built-in, image-related blocks. They provide theme authors with a ton of design freedom. Throw in a few custom styles and you can do something special for photoblogs. Even just supporting wide and full-width alignment goes a long way in providing users better options for photos.

The other missing piece of the puzzle for this theme is that it has no site title output. End-users can shoehorn it into the nav menu or customizable footer description, but it would be nice to see it as part of the theme header, even if disabled by default.

WPTavern: Simple Photoblogging with the Instapress WordPress Theme

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 05/11/2020 - 19:52

It is not often that I come across a free WordPress theme that instantly impresses me. Far too often, I spend half an hour or more just getting to know a theme, checking its options, and figuring out how long it will take to recreate something that looks remotely like the demo. However, every now and then I come across one of those diamonds in the rough that makes me a taker a deeper look.

Instapress is one of those themes. It is yet another reason I am in favor of a curated featured themes list. These types of unique themes tend to get lost in the crowd, and without the backing of a major company to market them, they usually go unnoticed by most WordPress users.

What drew me to Instapress was its take on presenting posts on the front end. It is a photoblogging theme that is mostly good at showing individual photos but little else. It also has some of the old-school simplicity from the early WordPress theme era.

Instapress is the first and only theme that Anton Lukin has submitted to the official WordPress theme directory. He runs the theme on his personal blog, in which he shares photos from the places he travels.

Beautiful Simplicity

The theme is truly a photoblogging-only theme. It is not ideal for long-form, textual content or many other types of sites. Fair warning: if your plan is to do anything other than post photos, you should look elsewhere.

This narrow design is what makes the theme stand out. On the blog page and other archive-type pages, the theme presents the featured image with an interesting JSON-style output of the post metadata such as the date, title, and author.

Posts page display from Instapress.

Instapress has a few customizer options. Along with a custom footer description, end-users can decide whether to show the post author and any custom meta in post summaries on blog and archive pages. Custom meta in this sense means all public custom fields, which may not be desirable for everyone, depending on what metadata is assigned to the post. However, it can be useful for photobloggers who include location data, such as latitude and longitude for their posts.

As shown in the following screenshot, Lukin includes the coordinates on his post (latlng):

Custom metadata from Baikal post.

Themes rarely get much simpler than Instapress. It is intentionally lightweight. The stylesheet comes in under 20 kb, which is what any photoblogger should look for in a theme. The theme should not be the bottleneck for page speed on image-heavy websites.

Areas to Improve

While being a fan of the theme, some small things could drastically improve its appeal to end-users. I would not want the theme to add too many extra options. Its simplicity is part of its charm. However, a couple of home/archive views that offer a wider photo layout or grid would add a nice touch without bloating the theme.

Typically, I would deduct massive points for a theme that has no block editor styles, particularly in 2020. It is such a huge user base to leave out. But, the biggest loss for this theme is not taking advantage of the built-in, image-related blocks. They provide theme authors with a ton of design freedom. Throw in a few custom styles and you can do something special for photoblogs. Even just supporting wide and full-width alignment goes a long way in providing users better options for photos.

The other missing piece of the puzzle for this theme is that it has no site title output. End-users can shoehorn it into the nav menu or customizable footer description, but it would be nice to see it as part of the theme header, even if disabled by default.

WPTavern: Simple Photoblogging with the Instapress WordPress Theme

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 05/11/2020 - 19:52

It is not often that I come across a free WordPress theme that instantly impresses me. Far too often, I spend half an hour or more just getting to know a theme, checking its options, and figuring out how long it will take to recreate something that looks remotely like the demo. However, every now and then I come across one of those diamonds in the rough that makes me a taker a deeper look.

Instapress is one of those themes. It is yet another reason I am in favor of a curated featured themes list. These types of unique themes tend to get lost in the crowd, and without the backing of a major company to market them, they usually go unnoticed by most WordPress users.

What drew me to Instapress was its take on presenting posts on the front end. It is a photoblogging theme that is mostly good at showing individual photos but little else. It also has some of the old-school simplicity from the early WordPress theme era.

Instapress is the first and only theme that Anton Lukin has submitted to the official WordPress theme directory. He runs the theme on his personal blog, in which he shares photos from the places he travels.

Beautiful Simplicity

The theme is truly a photoblogging-only theme. It is not ideal for long-form, textual content or many other types of sites. Fair warning: if your plan is to do anything other than post photos, you should look elsewhere.

This narrow design is what makes the theme stand out. On the blog page and other archive-type pages, the theme presents the featured image with an interesting JSON-style output of the post metadata such as the date, title, and author.

Posts page display from Instapress.

Instapress has a few customizer options. Along with a custom footer description, end-users can decide whether to show the post author and any custom meta in post summaries on blog and archive pages. Custom meta in this sense means all public custom fields, which may not be desirable for everyone, depending on what metadata is assigned to the post. However, it can be useful for photobloggers who include location data, such as latitude and longitude for their posts.

As shown in the following screenshot, Lukin includes the coordinates on his post (latlng):

Custom metadata from Baikal post.

Themes rarely get much simpler than Instapress. It is intentionally lightweight. The stylesheet comes in under 20 kb, which is what any photoblogger should look for in a theme. The theme should not be the bottleneck for page speed on image-heavy websites.

Areas to Improve

While being a fan of the theme, some small things could drastically improve its appeal to end-users. I would not want the theme to add too many extra options. Its simplicity is part of its charm. However, a couple of home/archive views that offer a wider photo layout or grid would add a nice touch without bloating the theme.

Typically, I would deduct massive points for a theme that has no block editor styles, particularly in 2020. It is such a huge user base to leave out. But, the biggest loss for this theme is not taking advantage of the built-in, image-related blocks. They provide theme authors with a ton of design freedom. Throw in a few custom styles and you can do something special for photoblogs. Even just supporting wide and full-width alignment goes a long way in providing users better options for photos.

The other missing piece of the puzzle for this theme is that it has no site title output. End-users can shoehorn it into the nav menu or customizable footer description, but it would be nice to see it as part of the theme header, even if disabled by default.

WPTavern: Simple Photoblogging with the Instapress WordPress Theme

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 05/11/2020 - 19:52

It is not often that I come across a free WordPress theme that instantly impresses me. Far too often, I spend half an hour or more just getting to know a theme, checking its options, and figuring out how long it will take to recreate something that looks remotely like the demo. However, every now and then I come across one of those diamonds in the rough that makes me a taker a deeper look.

Instapress is one of those themes. It is yet another reason I am in favor of a curated featured themes list. These types of unique themes tend to get lost in the crowd, and without the backing of a major company to market them, they usually go unnoticed by most WordPress users.

What drew me to Instapress was its take on presenting posts on the front end. It is a photoblogging theme that is mostly good at showing individual photos but little else. It also has some of the old-school simplicity from the early WordPress theme era.

Instapress is the first and only theme that Anton Lukin has submitted to the official WordPress theme directory. He runs the theme on his personal blog, in which he shares photos from the places he travels.

Beautiful Simplicity

The theme is truly a photoblogging-only theme. It is not ideal for long-form, textual content or many other types of sites. Fair warning: if your plan is to do anything other than post photos, you should look elsewhere.

This narrow design is what makes the theme stand out. On the blog page and other archive-type pages, the theme presents the featured image with an interesting JSON-style output of the post metadata such as the date, title, and author.

Posts page display from Instapress.

Instapress has a few customizer options. Along with a custom footer description, end-users can decide whether to show the post author and any custom meta in post summaries on blog and archive pages. Custom meta in this sense means all public custom fields, which may not be desirable for everyone, depending on what metadata is assigned to the post. However, it can be useful for photobloggers who include location data, such as latitude and longitude for their posts.

As shown in the following screenshot, Lukin includes the coordinates on his post (latlng):

Custom metadata from Baikal post.

Themes rarely get much simpler than Instapress. It is intentionally lightweight. The stylesheet comes in under 20 kb, which is what any photoblogger should look for in a theme. The theme should not be the bottleneck for page speed on image-heavy websites.

Areas to Improve

While being a fan of the theme, some small things could drastically improve its appeal to end-users. I would not want the theme to add too many extra options. Its simplicity is part of its charm. However, a couple of home/archive views that offer a wider photo layout or grid would add a nice touch without bloating the theme.

Typically, I would deduct massive points for a theme that has no block editor styles, particularly in 2020. It is such a huge user base to leave out. But, the biggest loss for this theme is not taking advantage of the built-in, image-related blocks. They provide theme authors with a ton of design freedom. Throw in a few custom styles and you can do something special for photoblogs. Even just supporting wide and full-width alignment goes a long way in providing users better options for photos.

The other missing piece of the puzzle for this theme is that it has no site title output. End-users can shoehorn it into the nav menu or customizable footer description, but it would be nice to see it as part of the theme header, even if disabled by default.

WPTavern: Simple Photoblogging with the Instapress WordPress Theme

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 05/11/2020 - 19:52

It is not often that I come across a free WordPress theme that instantly impresses me. Far too often, I spend half an hour or more just getting to know a theme, checking its options, and figuring out how long it will take to recreate something that looks remotely like the demo. However, every now and then I come across one of those diamonds in the rough that makes me a taker a deeper look.

Instapress is one of those themes. It is yet another reason I am in favor of a curated featured themes list. These types of unique themes tend to get lost in the crowd, and without the backing of a major company to market them, they usually go unnoticed by most WordPress users.

What drew me to Instapress was its take on presenting posts on the front end. It is a photoblogging theme that is mostly good at showing individual photos but little else. It also has some of the old-school simplicity from the early WordPress theme era.

Instapress is the first and only theme that Anton Lukin has submitted to the official WordPress theme directory. He runs the theme on his personal blog, in which he shares photos from the places he travels.

Beautiful Simplicity

The theme is truly a photoblogging-only theme. It is not ideal for long-form, textual content or many other types of sites. Fair warning: if your plan is to do anything other than post photos, you should look elsewhere.

This narrow design is what makes the theme stand out. On the blog page and other archive-type pages, the theme presents the featured image with an interesting JSON-style output of the post metadata such as the date, title, and author.

Posts page display from Instapress.

Instapress has a few customizer options. Along with a custom footer description, end-users can decide whether to show the post author and any custom meta in post summaries on blog and archive pages. Custom meta in this sense means all public custom fields, which may not be desirable for everyone, depending on what metadata is assigned to the post. However, it can be useful for photobloggers who include location data, such as latitude and longitude for their posts.

As shown in the following screenshot, Lukin includes the coordinates on his post (latlng):

Custom metadata from Baikal post.

Themes rarely get much simpler than Instapress. It is intentionally lightweight. The stylesheet comes in under 20 kb, which is what any photoblogger should look for in a theme. The theme should not be the bottleneck for page speed on image-heavy websites.

Areas to Improve

While being a fan of the theme, some small things could drastically improve its appeal to end-users. I would not want the theme to add too many extra options. Its simplicity is part of its charm. However, a couple of home/archive views that offer a wider photo layout or grid would add a nice touch without bloating the theme.

Typically, I would deduct massive points for a theme that has no block editor styles, particularly in 2020. It is such a huge user base to leave out. But, the biggest loss for this theme is not taking advantage of the built-in, image-related blocks. They provide theme authors with a ton of design freedom. Throw in a few custom styles and you can do something special for photoblogs. Even just supporting wide and full-width alignment goes a long way in providing users better options for photos.

The other missing piece of the puzzle for this theme is that it has no site title output. End-users can shoehorn it into the nav menu or customizable footer description, but it would be nice to see it as part of the theme header, even if disabled by default.

WPTavern: WordCamp Spain 2020 Q&A: Matt Mullenweg Discusses Virtual Events, Decoupled WordPress, and the Future of Page Builders

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 05/08/2020 - 22:41

Matt Mullenweg joined Matías Ventura at WordCamp Spain yesterday for a lively Q&A session. The virtual event drew 5,000 registered users, and attendees came prepared with some thought-provoking questions about the future of WordPress. Here are a few highlights on some recent topics of interest.

WordCamps around the globe have been going virtual, embracing the challenge of keeping communities connected through the screen. Mullenweg shared thoughts on how WordCamps have changed during the pandemic and what might be worthwhile to maintain after things go back to normal:

WordCamps were always exclusionary. If you couldn’t make it to be in a physical point at a physical time, you couldn’t be there. Tickets were cheap but travel and other costs could be expensive. To our mission of democratizing publishing, if we could radically open up some of the value of WordCamps, not just the talks because the talks you could always watch later online, but some of that person-to-person connection and relationship-building that would happen at WordCamps – if we can recreate that online I feel like that could be something that would be amazing for the WordPress community. I feel like we used our in-person events as a crutch, actually. Because they were so good, and I love them, we overweighted towards them. This time allows us to reflect and also try new things that we might not have been pushed to otherwise. I hope that we don’t stop any of these new things. I hope there are more WordCamp events in every language.

Large regional events like WordCamp Europe and WordCamp US will be going virtual in the coming months and it will be interesting to see how they work to reproduce the intimate, in-person connections that are often forged at these events.

One of the first questions was regarding Automattic’s recent investment in Frontity. Does Automattic’s interest mean that React might be implemented in the public part of WordPress? Mullenweg highlighted a few of the positive and negative aspects of decoupled WordPress setups but also confirmed that a React frontend is not on the roadmap for core:

I’m excited to be able to support Frontity. Automattic tries to support as many of the WordPress ecosystem companies as possible. If there is a company doing something interesting in WordPress, we would love to invest and support it. In terms of a React theme in default WordPress, I think that to me that stays in plugin and theme territory for the foreseeable future. The downside of that approach is that you lose all the capabilities of the decades of WordPress plugins and themes and integrations and everything when you move to that more decoupled React frontend. I don’t know if what you gain is that much better for a normal content website. In fact, so many single page applications in React when they get to version 2 or 3 usually work on server side rendering. We have server side rendering by default, and it’s really fast and really good, especially when you layer in AMP or some other things that can speed it up. It can actually be probably the best possible thing for content driven sites, the best practice, versus application driven sites where something like React might be better. If you take a really optimized PHP-served AMP page, performance-wise versus the same thing going through React, it’s hard for me to imagine the React page being faster. In fact, I think it would be much slower. That’s how I think about the defaults. But for people who are building more advanced applications or have some sort of constraint on their website where they need the React frontend, I think the decoupled use case of WordPress is stronger than ever. I don’t know why anyone would use a proprietary backend, like Contentful or something like that, when you have all the open source security, scalability, and robustness of WordPress available in a decoupled infrastructure as well.

Ventura noted that just because WordPress uses these technologies in the backend, doesn’t mean it has to be used on the frontend as well. Based on these comments, it doesn’t seem likely that WordPress will be adopting a React-based default theme anytime in the near future.

The fate of page builders in the Gutenberg era is always a popular topic during Q&A sessions and WordCamp Spain was no exception. The general concern is whether Gutenberg’s full site editing capabilities will make these plugins obsolete, but Mullenweg seemed optimistic about WordPress leaving page builders a piece of the market:

I’m really excited for the future of page builders. Before every single page builder would have to do a fair amount of work to recreate their version of blocks. There was a lot of wasted effort with many talented and great developers all over the world essentially rebuilding the wheel or recreating the block over and over. Now that we have these rails in the core of this block infrastructure, it’s been widely adopted and implemented with thousands of blocks being created and many more to come, they don’t have to create that core fundamental infrastructure and can instead innovate on top of it, because there are so many cool things you can do in page builders that are out of scope of where we want to take Gutenberg.

Mullenweg also said he anticipates that page builders that are not built with Gutenberg in mind will likely be used less and less over time. However, it should be reassuring that there will still be a place in the WordPress ecosystem for products that build on top of the core standard.

The Q&A session included many more questions on topics of interest, including when multi-language is coming to core, the future of themes, the present and future of the WP REST API, and what new business options may be coming to the WordPress ecosystem. Check out the recorded session embedded below to find out what Matt and Matías would improve in WordPress if they had a magic wand.

WPTavern: WordCamp Spain 2020 Q&A: Matt Mullenweg Discusses Virtual Events, Decoupled WordPress, and the Future of Page Builders

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 05/08/2020 - 22:41

Matt Mullenweg joined Matías Ventura at WordCamp Spain yesterday for a lively Q&A session. The virtual event drew 5,000 registered users, and attendees came prepared with some thought-provoking questions about the future of WordPress. Here are a few highlights on some recent topics of interest.

WordCamps around the globe have been going virtual, embracing the challenge of keeping communities connected through the screen. Mullenweg shared thoughts on how WordCamps have changed during the pandemic and what might be worthwhile to maintain after things go back to normal:

WordCamps were always exclusionary. If you couldn’t make it to be in a physical point at a physical time, you couldn’t be there. Tickets were cheap but travel and other costs could be expensive. To our mission of democratizing publishing, if we could radically open up some of the value of WordCamps, not just the talks because the talks you could always watch later online, but some of that person-to-person connection and relationship-building that would happen at WordCamps – if we can recreate that online I feel like that could be something that would be amazing for the WordPress community. I feel like we used our in-person events as a crutch, actually. Because they were so good, and I love them, we overweighted towards them. This time allows us to reflect and also try new things that we might not have been pushed to otherwise. I hope that we don’t stop any of these new things. I hope there are more WordCamp events in every language.

Large regional events like WordCamp Europe and WordCamp US will be going virtual in the coming months and it will be interesting to see how they work to reproduce the intimate, in-person connections that are often forged at these events.

One of the first questions was regarding Automattic’s recent investment in Frontity. Does Automattic’s interest mean that React might be implemented in the public part of WordPress? Mullenweg highlighted a few of the positive and negative aspects of decoupled WordPress setups but also confirmed that a React frontend is not on the roadmap for core:

I’m excited to be able to support Frontity. Automattic tries to support as many of the WordPress ecosystem companies as possible. If there is a company doing something interesting in WordPress, we would love to invest and support it. In terms of a React theme in default WordPress, I think that to me that stays in plugin and theme territory for the foreseeable future. The downside of that approach is that you lose all the capabilities of the decades of WordPress plugins and themes and integrations and everything when you move to that more decoupled React frontend. I don’t know if what you gain is that much better for a normal content website. In fact, so many single page applications in React when they get to version 2 or 3 usually work on server side rendering. We have server side rendering by default, and it’s really fast and really good, especially when you layer in AMP or some other things that can speed it up. It can actually be probably the best possible thing for content driven sites, the best practice, versus application driven sites where something like React might be better. If you take a really optimized PHP-served AMP page, performance-wise versus the same thing going through React, it’s hard for me to imagine the React page being faster. In fact, I think it would be much slower. That’s how I think about the defaults. But for people who are building more advanced applications or have some sort of constraint on their website where they need the React frontend, I think the decoupled use case of WordPress is stronger than ever. I don’t know why anyone would use a proprietary backend, like Contentful or something like that, when you have all the open source security, scalability, and robustness of WordPress available in a decoupled infrastructure as well.

Ventura noted that just because WordPress uses these technologies in the backend, doesn’t mean it has to be used on the frontend as well. Based on these comments, it doesn’t seem likely that WordPress will be adopting a React-based default theme anytime in the near future.

The fate of page builders in the Gutenberg era is always a popular topic during Q&A sessions and WordCamp Spain was no exception. The general concern is whether Gutenberg’s full site editing capabilities will make these plugins obsolete, but Mullenweg seemed optimistic about WordPress leaving page builders a piece of the market:

I’m really excited for the future of page builders. Before every single page builder would have to do a fair amount of work to recreate their version of blocks. There was a lot of wasted effort with many talented and great developers all over the world essentially rebuilding the wheel or recreating the block over and over. Now that we have these rails in the core of this block infrastructure, it’s been widely adopted and implemented with thousands of blocks being created and many more to come, they don’t have to create that core fundamental infrastructure and can instead innovate on top of it, because there are so many cool things you can do in page builders that are out of scope of where we want to take Gutenberg.

Mullenweg also said he anticipates that page builders that are not built with Gutenberg in mind will likely be used less and less over time. However, it should be reassuring that there will still be a place in the WordPress ecosystem for products that build on top of the core standard.

The Q&A session included many more questions on topics of interest, including when multi-language is coming to core, the future of themes, the present and future of the WP REST API, and what new business options may be coming to the WordPress ecosystem. Check out the recorded session embedded below to find out what Matt and Matías would improve in WordPress if they had a magic wand.

WPTavern: WordCamp Spain 2020 Q&A: Matt Mullenweg Discusses Virtual Events, Decoupled WordPress, and the Future of Page Builders

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 05/08/2020 - 22:41

Matt Mullenweg joined Matías Ventura at WordCamp Spain yesterday for a lively Q&A session. The virtual event drew 5,000 registered users, and attendees came prepared with some thought-provoking questions about the future of WordPress. Here are a few highlights on some recent topics of interest.

WordCamps around the globe have been going virtual, embracing the challenge of keeping communities connected through the screen. Mullenweg shared thoughts on how WordCamps have changed during the pandemic and what might be worthwhile to maintain after things go back to normal:

WordCamps were always exclusionary. If you couldn’t make it to be in a physical point at a physical time, you couldn’t be there. Tickets were cheap but travel and other costs could be expensive. To our mission of democratizing publishing, if we could radically open up some of the value of WordCamps, not just the talks because the talks you could always watch later online, but some of that person-to-person connection and relationship-building that would happen at WordCamps – if we can recreate that online I feel like that could be something that would be amazing for the WordPress community. I feel like we used our in-person events as a crutch, actually. Because they were so good, and I love them, we overweighted towards them. This time allows us to reflect and also try new things that we might not have been pushed to otherwise. I hope that we don’t stop any of these new things. I hope there are more WordCamp events in every language.

Large regional events like WordCamp Europe and WordCamp US will be going virtual in the coming months and it will be interesting to see how they work to reproduce the intimate, in-person connections that are often forged at these events.

One of the first questions was regarding Automattic’s recent investment in Frontity. Does Automattic’s interest mean that React might be implemented in the public part of WordPress? Mullenweg highlighted a few of the positive and negative aspects of decoupled WordPress setups but also confirmed that a React frontend is not on the roadmap for core:

I’m excited to be able to support Frontity. Automattic tries to support as many of the WordPress ecosystem companies as possible. If there is a company doing something interesting in WordPress, we would love to invest and support it. In terms of a React theme in default WordPress, I think that to me that stays in plugin and theme territory for the foreseeable future. The downside of that approach is that you lose all the capabilities of the decades of WordPress plugins and themes and integrations and everything when you move to that more decoupled React frontend. I don’t know if what you gain is that much better for a normal content website. In fact, so many single page applications in React when they get to version 2 or 3 usually work on server side rendering. We have server side rendering by default, and it’s really fast and really good, especially when you layer in AMP or some other things that can speed it up. It can actually be probably the best possible thing for content driven sites, the best practice, versus application driven sites where something like React might be better. If you take a really optimized PHP-served AMP page, performance-wise versus the same thing going through React, it’s hard for me to imagine the React page being faster. In fact, I think it would be much slower. That’s how I think about the defaults. But for people who are building more advanced applications or have some sort of constraint on their website where they need the React frontend, I think the decoupled use case of WordPress is stronger than ever. I don’t know why anyone would use a proprietary backend, like Contentful or something like that, when you have all the open source security, scalability, and robustness of WordPress available in a decoupled infrastructure as well.

Ventura noted that just because WordPress uses these technologies in the backend, doesn’t mean it has to be used on the frontend as well. Based on these comments, it doesn’t seem likely that WordPress will be adopting a React-based default theme anytime in the near future.

The fate of page builders in the Gutenberg era is always a popular topic during Q&A sessions and WordCamp Spain was no exception. The general concern is whether Gutenberg’s full site editing capabilities will make these plugins obsolete, but Mullenweg seemed optimistic about WordPress leaving page builders a piece of the market:

I’m really excited for the future of page builders. Before every single page builder would have to do a fair amount of work to recreate their version of blocks. There was a lot of wasted effort with many talented and great developers all over the world essentially rebuilding the wheel or recreating the block over and over. Now that we have these rails in the core of this block infrastructure, it’s been widely adopted and implemented with thousands of blocks being created and many more to come, they don’t have to create that core fundamental infrastructure and can instead innovate on top of it, because there are so many cool things you can do in page builders that are out of scope of where we want to take Gutenberg.

Mullenweg also said he anticipates that page builders that are not built with Gutenberg in mind will likely be used less and less over time. However, it should be reassuring that there will still be a place in the WordPress ecosystem for products that build on top of the core standard.

The Q&A session included many more questions on topics of interest, including when multi-language is coming to core, the future of themes, the present and future of the WP REST API, and what new business options may be coming to the WordPress ecosystem. Check out the recorded session embedded below to find out what Matt and Matías would improve in WordPress if they had a magic wand.

WPTavern: WordCamp Spain 2020 Q&A: Matt Mullenweg Discusses Virtual Events, Decoupled WordPress, and the Future of Page Builders

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 05/08/2020 - 22:41

Matt Mullenweg joined Matías Ventura at WordCamp Spain yesterday for a lively Q&A session. The virtual event drew 5,000 registered users, and attendees came prepared with some thought-provoking questions about the future of WordPress. Here are a few highlights on some recent topics of interest.

WordCamps around the globe have been going virtual, embracing the challenge of keeping communities connected through the screen. Mullenweg shared thoughts on how WordCamps have changed during the pandemic and what might be worthwhile to maintain after things go back to normal:

WordCamps were always exclusionary. If you couldn’t make it to be in a physical point at a physical time, you couldn’t be there. Tickets were cheap but travel and other costs could be expensive. To our mission of democratizing publishing, if we could radically open up some of the value of WordCamps, not just the talks because the talks you could always watch later online, but some of that person-to-person connection and relationship-building that would happen at WordCamps – if we can recreate that online I feel like that could be something that would be amazing for the WordPress community. I feel like we used our in-person events as a crutch, actually. Because they were so good, and I love them, we overweighted towards them. This time allows us to reflect and also try new things that we might not have been pushed to otherwise. I hope that we don’t stop any of these new things. I hope there are more WordCamp events in every language.

Large regional events like WordCamp Europe and WordCamp US will be going virtual in the coming months and it will be interesting to see how they work to reproduce the intimate, in-person connections that are often forged at these events.

One of the first questions was regarding Automattic’s recent investment in Frontity. Does Automattic’s interest mean that React might be implemented in the public part of WordPress? Mullenweg highlighted a few of the positive and negative aspects of decoupled WordPress setups but also confirmed that a React frontend is not on the roadmap for core:

I’m excited to be able to support Frontity. Automattic tries to support as many of the WordPress ecosystem companies as possible. If there is a company doing something interesting in WordPress, we would love to invest and support it. In terms of a React theme in default WordPress, I think that to me that stays in plugin and theme territory for the foreseeable future. The downside of that approach is that you lose all the capabilities of the decades of WordPress plugins and themes and integrations and everything when you move to that more decoupled React frontend. I don’t know if what you gain is that much better for a normal content website. In fact, so many single page applications in React when they get to version 2 or 3 usually work on server side rendering. We have server side rendering by default, and it’s really fast and really good, especially when you layer in AMP or some other things that can speed it up. It can actually be probably the best possible thing for content driven sites, the best practice, versus application driven sites where something like React might be better. If you take a really optimized PHP-served AMP page, performance-wise versus the same thing going through React, it’s hard for me to imagine the React page being faster. In fact, I think it would be much slower. That’s how I think about the defaults. But for people who are building more advanced applications or have some sort of constraint on their website where they need the React frontend, I think the decoupled use case of WordPress is stronger than ever. I don’t know why anyone would use a proprietary backend, like Contentful or something like that, when you have all the open source security, scalability, and robustness of WordPress available in a decoupled infrastructure as well.

Ventura noted that just because WordPress uses these technologies in the backend, doesn’t mean it has to be used on the frontend as well. Based on these comments, it doesn’t seem likely that WordPress will be adopting a React-based default theme anytime in the near future.

The fate of page builders in the Gutenberg era is always a popular topic during Q&A sessions and WordCamp Spain was no exception. The general concern is whether Gutenberg’s full site editing capabilities will make these plugins obsolete, but Mullenweg seemed optimistic about WordPress leaving page builders a piece of the market:

I’m really excited for the future of page builders. Before every single page builder would have to do a fair amount of work to recreate their version of blocks. There was a lot of wasted effort with many talented and great developers all over the world essentially rebuilding the wheel or recreating the block over and over. Now that we have these rails in the core of this block infrastructure, it’s been widely adopted and implemented with thousands of blocks being created and many more to come, they don’t have to create that core fundamental infrastructure and can instead innovate on top of it, because there are so many cool things you can do in page builders that are out of scope of where we want to take Gutenberg.

Mullenweg also said he anticipates that page builders that are not built with Gutenberg in mind will likely be used less and less over time. However, it should be reassuring that there will still be a place in the WordPress ecosystem for products that build on top of the core standard.

The Q&A session included many more questions on topics of interest, including when multi-language is coming to core, the future of themes, the present and future of the WP REST API, and what new business options may be coming to the WordPress ecosystem. Check out the recorded session embedded below to find out what Matt and Matías would improve in WordPress if they had a magic wand.

WPTavern: Drag and Drop Nav Menu Items in WordPress

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 05/08/2020 - 19:15

Earlier this week, Sajjad Hossain Sagor released the first version of his Drag & Drop Menu Items plugin in the WordPress plugin repository. The plugin is a one-off, single-use plugin that does exactly what its name describes — it allows end-users to drag menu items from the meta boxes on the nav menu screen to the menu they are currently editing.

Sagor is a freelance web developer from Bangladesh. Drag & Drop Menu Items is the latest of his 18 contributions to the free plugin directory.

The plugin is simple in nature and does its one job well. To use it, users merely need to open the Appearance > Menus screen in the WordPress admin. Menu items from the meta boxes under the “Add menu items” section can then be dragged into the menu under the “Menu structure” section.

Dragging an item into a custom menu.

When dragging a menu item over, a drop-box appears between each of the existing items in the menu. It is worth noting that you cannot drag items into a sub-menu slot directly from the meta boxes. This is on par with the default functionality and could be a limitation of WordPress. However, sub-menu organization works as usual.

The Drag & Drop Menu Items plugin is limited to the Menus screen in the WordPress admin. It does not work in the customizer, which sports a different interface and method of adding menu items.

The plugin code is minimal and does not appear to have any issues. The additional JavaScript, at less than 4 kb, should not add much weight to the page either.

By default, WordPress requires two mouse clicks to add an item to a menu: one click to tick the checkbox and a button click to add the item. However, the default method also allows users to append multiple items at once.

On the whole, the plugin is a good option for users who prefer the drag-and-drop method of adding items or those who prefer to have both methods at their disposal. It adds a nice touch that would make sense as an existing part of WordPress.

An Uncertain Future Experimental Navigation screen from the Gutenberg plugin.

Eventually, Drag & Drop Menu Items may no longer function. The Gutenberg plugin team has already built an early experimental version of a new Navigation screen in the admin. The plan is to incorporate this new screen into core WordPress in the future.

The new screen will work within the block system and likely use the work that has gone into the existing Navigation block. This will provide consistency in how menus are added across the site.

For now, if you would like the ability to drag and drop menu items, this plugin is a solid solution.

WPTavern: Drag and Drop Nav Menu Items in WordPress

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 05/08/2020 - 19:15

Earlier this week, Sajjad Hossain Sagor released the first version of his Drag & Drop Menu Items plugin in the WordPress plugin repository. The plugin is a one-off, single-use plugin that does exactly what its name describes — it allows end-users to drag menu items from the meta boxes on the nav menu screen to the menu they are currently editing.

Sagor is a freelance web developer from Bangladesh. Drag & Drop Menu Items is the latest of his 18 contributions to the free plugin directory.

The plugin is simple in nature and does its one job well. To use it, users merely need to open the Appearance > Menus screen in the WordPress admin. Menu items from the meta boxes under the “Add menu items” section can then be dragged into the menu under the “Menu structure” section.

Dragging an item into a custom menu.

When dragging a menu item over, a drop-box appears between each of the existing items in the menu. It is worth noting that you cannot drag items into a sub-menu slot directly from the meta boxes. This is on par with the default functionality and could be a limitation of WordPress. However, sub-menu organization works as usual.

The Drag & Drop Menu Items plugin is limited to the Menus screen in the WordPress admin. It does not work in the customizer, which sports a different interface and method of adding menu items.

The plugin code is minimal and does not appear to have any issues. The additional JavaScript, at less than 4 kb, should not add much weight to the page either.

By default, WordPress requires two mouse clicks to add an item to a menu: one click to tick the checkbox and a button click to add the item. However, the default method also allows users to append multiple items at once.

On the whole, the plugin is a good option for users who prefer the drag-and-drop method of adding items or those who prefer to have both methods at their disposal. It adds a nice touch that would make sense as an existing part of WordPress.

An Uncertain Future Experimental Navigation screen from the Gutenberg plugin.

Eventually, Drag & Drop Menu Items may no longer function. The Gutenberg plugin team has already built an early experimental version of a new Navigation screen in the admin. The plan is to incorporate this new screen into core WordPress in the future.

The new screen will work within the block system and likely use the work that has gone into the existing Navigation block. This will provide consistency in how menus are added across the site.

For now, if you would like the ability to drag and drop menu items, this plugin is a solid solution.

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