Wordpress News

WPTavern: Video: Matt Mullenweg’s Summertime Update At WCEU 2018

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 07/10/2018 - 23:56

Sessions from WordCamp Europe 2018 are making their way onto WordPress.tv, including Matt Mullenweg’s Summertime Update.

In the video, Mullenweg shares the progress that’s been made on Gutenberg, WordPress core development, a Gutenberg road map for including it into core, and what to expect after WordPress 5.0 is released.

Be sure to watch the video to the end to catch the memorable, GDPR cookie joke.

WPTavern: WPCampus Will Be Streamed Live For Free July 13-14

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 07/10/2018 - 23:36

WPCampus, a conference focused on WordPress in higher-education takes place this week between July 12-14 at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri.

If you’re unable to attend in-person or would like to watch the event from home, visit the WPCampus Stream page. Beginning July 13th at 9AM CDT, all general sessions will be streamed live for free. Sessions will be recorded and be available after the event as well.

To see a list of sessions taking place, check out the event’s schedule and for more information about WPCampus, visit the site’s about page.

WPTavern: New Classic Editor Addon Plugin Disables the “Try Gutenberg” Prompt Coming in WordPress 4.9.8

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 07/10/2018 - 22:35
photo credit: Hermes Rivera

Gutenberg development continues along the roadmap Matt Mullenweg announced at WordCamp Europe with WordPress 4.9.8 set to introduce a “Try Gutenberg” prompt to increase usage and testing. Core design contributors are currently working on a few new iterations of the callout. They are also considering including a section inside the prompt with an option to install the Classic Editor plugin in preparation for Gutenberg.

Developers and agencies have time to install the Classic Editor on client sites that are not ready for Gutenberg, but this will not prevent users from seeing the “Try Gutenberg” prompt. Greg Schoppe, one of Gutenberg’s most outspoken critics, partnered with Pieter Bos to develop a plugin called Classic Editor Addon that changes how the Classic Editor plugin works.

“For agencies supporting many sites, whose users have no way of knowing whether Gutenberg will break their site or not, this nag screen is a danger,” Schoppe commented on our most recent Gutenberg update. “Pre-emptively installing Classic Editor unfortunately won’t suppress the nag notice either, but since Classic Editor is being used as a bellwether of the success of Gutenberg, it’s important that you install it, if you expect issues.”

Schoppe co-wrote the Classic Editor Addon to solve this problem. It suppresses the “Try Gutenberg” prompt and when the new editing experience ships in 5.0, it will automatically suppress Gutenberg as well.

Since the Classic Editor plugin doesn’t remove Gutenberg by default, the addon plugin sets the option to fully replace Gutenberg. It also removes the Classic Editor’s options from the Settings > Writing screen. Schoppe said he believes this is what the Classic Editor plugin should have done out of the box, instead of requiring the user to find the settings screen to replace Gutenberg.

Installing both the Classic Editor and Classic Editor Addon on tens or hundreds of client sites could be time consuming, so Schoppe suggests using a site management dashboard, such as MainWP, ManageWP, or Jetpack, to bulk install both plugins for clients.

According to stats on WordPress.org, Gutenberg is active on more than 10,000 sites and the Classic Editor is active on 4,000+ sites. The “Try Gutenberg” prompt is expected to go out in WordPress 4.9.8, which is targeted for the end of July. The goal for the prompt is to make users aware of the plugin and get more testers involved before Gutenberg lands in WordPress 5.0.

Post Status: Working on your own website — Draft podcast

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 07/09/2018 - 18:34

Welcome to the Post Status Draft podcast, which you can find on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, and via RSS for your favorite podcatcher. Post Status Draft is hosted by Brian Krogsgard and co-host Brian Richards.

In this episode, the Brians discuss the challenges of working on your own business website, when your company offers services or makes products for websites. Agencies often disregard their own websites, as do product companies. We discuss our own histories of attempting in-house redesign projects, strategies to get them done, and how we approach things today owning our own tiny businesses.

Episode Links Sponsor: Pagely

Pagely offers best in class managed WordPress hosting, powered by the Amazon Cloud, the Internet’s most reliable infrastructure. Post Status is proudly hosted by Pagely. Thank you to Pagely for being a Post Status partner

WPTavern: How WordPress is Powering a New Community on the Remote Island of Ogijima

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 07/09/2018 - 16:09

Junko Nukaga began her journey into the world of WordPress in 2011, just after her hometown in Fukushima prefecture was hit by the 9.0 magnitude Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami. The catastrophic event, referred to in Japan as the Great East Japan Earthquake, devastated the region’s infrastructure and took more than 15,000 lives. It also caused a level 7 meltdown at three reactors in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant complex.

Until this point Nukaga had only used WordPress as a blogging tool, but her hometown prefecture needed a fast way to get a website up for publishing accurate measurements of the radiation levels. Although she was living in Osaka at the time, Nukaga joined the volunteer team and built the site using WordPress. In addition to local radiation levels, it also had FAQ’s about radiation from scientists to combat the misinformation that was rampant at the time. People found the site through social networks and word of mouth.

After making a difference for her hometown with WordPress, Nukaga wanted to find out more about the community behind the software. She joined an offline WordBench meetup and got connected to the WordPress community. The next year she co-organized WordCamp Osaka 2012, and in 2014 she became the lead organizer of WordCamp Kansai, an area that includes seven prefectures: Mie, Shiga, Kyoto, Osaka, Hyogo, Nara, Wakayama.

As Nukaga became more deeply involved in the WordPress community as a speaker, organizer, and contributor, she developed a new understanding of the power of open source collaboration. After moving to the remote island of Ogijima in 2014, she was inspired to create a library and cultural center, using WordPress to organize a team of more than 200 volunteers.

“When my family and I moved to this island, the school here was closed, because there were no kids on Ogijima,” Nukaga said. “We have a daughter, so we urged the government to reopen the school.

“Although the school restarted, I thought that it would be meaningless for the school to stop or close again when our daughter graduated. The island is an aging society and no new children will be born here. I figured that if there was a library, I could call migrants to the island. A library which is free and an open space would help solve many things, such as children’s learning environment, communication support for the islanders, and migration consultation, for example.”

Nukaga set up a WordPress website before constructing the library so her team of volunteers could disclose the progress of the building and recruit followers. They promoted the website through social networks and were able to crowdfund efforts to construct and maintain the building.

The Ogijima Library opened in February 2014 as a non-profit organization that is rooted in the community, providing a place where people can connect through books and share knowledge with one another. Residents on the island now have access to titles and periodicals that would previously have required a boat trip to acquire. More than 50 migrants have moved to the island within the last four years since the library opened, including families with babies born last year.

“Without WordPress, none of this would have been possible,” Nukaga said. “WordPress opened my way. It taught me the philosophy of open source. I have used this philosophy to involve many unspecified people from the beginning of the process of making the library. We built the building ourselves with the help of 200 volunteers, and we continue to get support through book donations. Also, thanks to the flexibility of WordPress, the things I wanted to do, such as updating, providing a search system for books, and linking to social networks, were all possible.”

WordCamp Ogijima: “Empowering the Smalls to Go Big”

The WordPress community on the island is also thriving, thanks to community organizers who call Ogijima home. Nukaga organizes the meetups, which average 5 to 20 attendees at each event. Shinichi Nishikawa, who organized WordCamp Tokyo in 2012 and WordCamp Bangkok 2017 and 2018, made his home on the island in March 2016. He is joining forces with Nukaga and a team of 35 leaders and volunteers to organize the first WordCamp Ogijima on July 15, 2018.

This will be the first Japanese WordCamp not held in the cities. Organizers have chartered two ferries to transport more than 250 attendees to the island. Camping is the primary lodging option in tents beside the island’s lighthouse and organizers have planned a BBQ after party. Although the event is currently sold out, 10 additional tickets will go on sale on July 10 due to cancellations and an estimation of no-shows.

“The uniqueness of the community in this area is that there are many with different backgrounds,” Nukaga said. “WordCamps in the city are mainly attended by engineers, designers and bloggers, but here there are people who are restaurant managers, farmers, a barber, an illustrator, a ranger (nature protection officer), baker, and others who are interested in WordPress.”

The organizing team, which includes many new contributors from all walks of life, along with meetup organizers in the Setouchi inland sea area, has adopted the theme “Empowering the smalls to go big.”

Ogijima’s local community includes members like Kaisho Damonte, who is using WordPress and WooCommerce to power a website for the bakery and cafe business he started after renovating a 100-year-old barn on the island. Kentaro Yamaguchi, another island resident, uses WordPress for his barber shop’s website.

Shinichi Nishikawa said he sees WordCamp Ogijima as “a WordCamp in a new place, for new audiences, by new organizers.” He appreciates the openness of the islanders who are willing to embrace new things.

“The WordPress community on the island represents this atmosphere,” Nishikawa said. “Everyone has their own views, plans for their lives, and their own ways of thinking. WordPress, with its ‘Democratization of Publishing’ mission is a great match to us, who are trying to make our lives in different ways. We have built a library, cafe, a barbershop, and offices DIY ourselves. When it comes to websites, WordPress helps us a lot.”

The WordPress Community in Ogijima is Defined by a Focus on Cooperative Learning

One of the most inspirational aspects of the community in Ogijima, along with the greater Japanese WordPress community, is the strong emphasis on helping each other learn and succeed. New members are often woven into the community through meetups that focus on connecting around specific interests outside of WordPress technical skill. The community warmly welcomes users who are new to WordPress who want to get help with their websites. Nishikawa said this is the particular audience that the Ogijima meetup is trying to reach.

“We want to connect with individuals who want to achieve something; small business owners, designers, photographers, writers, editors, and anyone who is struggling doing something on the web,” Nishikawa said. “By coming together, you notice that there are many friends who are struggling as well. Experienced developers attend as usual but their role this time is to share their knowledge to the new people. We help each other build and improve our websites. It’s a very relaxed and helping atmosphere in the meetups. We do have some presentations sometimes but that’s not the main thing.”

WordPress Core Committer Mike Schroder will be speaking at WordCamp Ogijima about how everyone has something unique to bring to the community to help it grow.

“I initially visited Japan for WordCamp Tokyo a few years ago — largely because it was the biggest WordCamp in the world at the time,” Schroder said. “The community in Japan is extremely active and welcoming, and I quickly made many friends. One unique part of the community is that it has a big focus on education. The WordBench events are excellent!”

“As the theme of the event is ‘Empower the smalls to go big,’ I’m looking forward to sharing some bits of my background, and how others have helped me grow, in an effort to show folks that they have a lot to offer,” Schroder said. (He’s also doing a bit of research and is interested to hear stories from others about unique aspects of their lives that have helped them succeed in the WordPress ecosystem. You can ping him @mike on WP Slack if you want to contribute.)

The community in Ogijima is a beautiful example of how WordPress is powering a new wave of makers and doers on the island. The software has enabled them to establish new businesses, commerce, and cultural centers in a remote area where they are building their lives. WordCamp Ogijima is a classic example of what a WordCamp should be – an event that highlights the successes of local WordPress users.

“While I don’t think our numbers will grow, our lives will always need WordPress and its community,” Nishikawa said regarding the local meetups. “And we welcome ambitious attendees who need help.”

Dev Blog: Update on Gutenberg

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 07/06/2018 - 19:23

Progress on the Gutenberg project, the new content creating experience coming to WordPress, has come a long way. Since the start of the project, there have been 30 releases and 12 of those happened after WordCamp US 2017. In total, there have been 1,764 issues opened and 1,115 closed. As the work on phase one moves into its final stretch, here is what you can expect.

In Progress
  • Freeze new features in Gutenberg (the feature list can be found here).
  • Hosts, agencies, teachers invited to opt-in sites they have influence over.
  • WordPress.com has opt-in for wp-admin users. The number of sites and posts will be tracked.
  • Mobile app support for Gutenberg will be across iOS and Android.
July
  • 4.9.x release with an invitation to install either Gutenberg or Classic Editor plugin.
  • WordPress.com will move to opt-out. There will be tracking to see who opts out and why.
  • Triage increases and bug gardening escalates to get blockers in Gutenberg down to zero.
  • Gutenberg phase two, Customization exploration begins by moving beyond the post.
August and beyond
  • All critical issues within Gutenberg are resolved.
  • There is full integration with Calypso and there is opt-in for users there.
  • A goal will be 100k+ sites having made 250k+ posts using Gutenberg.
  • Core merge of Gutenberg begins the 5.0 release cycle.
  • 5.0 moves into beta releases and translations are completed.
  • There will be a mobile version of Gutenberg by the end of the year.

WordPress 5.0 could be as soon as August with hundreds of thousands of sites using Gutenberg before release. Learn more about Gutenberg here, take it for a test drive, install on your site, follow along on GitHub and give your feedback.

Update on Gutenberg

Wordpress News - Fri, 07/06/2018 - 19:23

Progress on the Gutenberg project, the new content creating experience coming to WordPress, has come a long way. Since the start of the project, there have been 30 releases and 12 of those happened after WordCamp US 2017. In total, there have been 1,764 issues opened and 1,115 closed as of WordCamp Europe. As the work on phase one moves into its final stretch, here is what you can expect.

In Progress
  • Freeze new features in Gutenberg (the feature list can be found here).
  • Hosts, agencies, teachers invited to opt-in sites they have influence over.
  • WordPress.com has opt-in for wp-admin users. The number of sites and posts will be tracked.
  • Mobile app support for Gutenberg will be across iOS and Android.
July
  • 4.9.x release with an invitation to install either Gutenberg or Classic Editor plugin.
  • WordPress.com will move to opt-out. There will be tracking to see who opts out and why.
  • Triage increases and bug gardening escalates to get blockers in Gutenberg down to zero.
  • Gutenberg phase two, Customization exploration begins by moving beyond the post.
August and beyond
  • All critical issues within Gutenberg are resolved.
  • There is full integration with Calypso and there is opt-in for users there.
  • A goal will be 100k+ sites having made 250k+ posts using Gutenberg.
  • Core merge of Gutenberg begins the 5.0 release cycle.
  • 5.0 moves into beta releases and translations are completed.
  • There will be a mobile version of Gutenberg by the end of the year.

WordPress 5.0 could be as soon as August with hundreds of thousands of sites using Gutenberg before release. Learn more about Gutenberg here, take it for a test drive, install on your site, follow along on GitHub and give your feedback.

WPTavern: WordPress 4.9.8 to Introduce “Try Gutenberg” Callout

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 07/05/2018 - 21:39

Paul Biron and Joshua Wold are leading the upcoming WordPress 4.9.8 release, which was originally announced as 4.9.7. WordPress core contributors met yesterday to decide the general focus and set the release schedule. In the meantime, the 4.9.7 security and maintenance release was rolled out to fix an authenticated arbitrary file deletion vulnerability, along with a few other minor updates.

WordPress 4.9.8 is targeted for July 31, 2018, with a beta as early as July 17. The release will focus on introducing the “Try Gutenberg” callout and adding privacy fixes and enhancements. The ticket proposing the callout was opened a year ago and was planned to be included in WordPress 4.9.5 but was eventually pulled before the release in favor of allowing Gutenberg contributors to iron out a few important issues.

WordPress Core Committer Mel Choyce added the most recent round of designs to the ticket four weeks ago and contributors are still iterating on the design and text for the callout. Another iteration is expected to be added to the ticket early next week.

WordPress 4.9.8 is another step in Matt Mullenweg’s roadmap for getting Gutenberg into 5.0. The goal is to make more users aware of Gutenberg and to gather more testing and feedback before the new editor lands in core. The prompt will include a prominent button that users can click to install the Gutenberg plugin, along with links for where to learn more and how to report issues.

WPTavern: Just Write: A Client-Side React App for Writing and Editing WordPress Posts

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 07/05/2018 - 18:09

WordPress developer Jason Bobich has created an open source client-side React app called Just Write that provides a decoupled editing experience for WordPress. Bobich said he built the app in 10 days to explore the possibilities of React and the WP REST API.

Although it’s still a work in progress, the app has a demo where curious testers can manage posts from any WordPress website that’s secured with HTTPS and has the JWT Authentication plugin installed. Alternatively, testers can click on the “play in the sandbox” to bypass authentication.

Once logged in, the user sees a dashboard with the most recent posts, a deliberate design decision that Bobich made to “motivate the user to do one thing – to just write.”

The editor includes support for Markdown and a simple preview with a sticky toolbar at the top. Just Write also allows the user to edit their profile and personal information in a dropdown at the top of the screen.

Bobich said he created to the app to improve his JavaScript skills and doesn’t have a plan to use it for business.

“Ever since we were all told a couple of years ago, ‘Learn JavaScript deeply,’ I’ve seen just how many holes I had in my own JavaScript knowledge,” Bobich said. “I’ve been working hard the last couple of years to become more than just a jQuery monkey. And so this project is just another step towards my personal growth surrounding the technologies involved here. It’s so exciting to think about the potential things that we can build in the community with React and the WordPress API.”

WP REST API Currently Poses Complicated Hurdles for App Developers

After the REST API was merged into core, the time seemed ripe for developers to build a proliferation of different writing experiences for users. However, working with the API still has many hurdles for application developers, limitations that Bobich said he became acquainted with while developing Just Write.

“For anyone wanting to build a practical application like this, the first glaring issue is around authentication,” Bobich said. “WordPress has no way to securely authenticate from outside of the WordPress admin. So expecting any average user to set up oAuth or JWT with a third-party plugin is a bit of a reach.”

Bobich also encountered issues working with media and saving content the WordPress way (which allows shortcodes to get parsed before wpautop()). The application is not yet ready for real, practical use but would require even more API calls to do things like get ahold of categories and tags or add the ability to create new ones.

“Think about all the work WordPress has put into the way we embed media in different ways,” Bobich said. “Just having basic things we take for granted — pasting a YouTube link, a tweet, uploading an image and having it cropped 100 ways ’til Sunday — for all work properly would all take custom JavaScript coding.”

Bobich said he thinks these limitations are the reason why there aren’t yet more applications built with decoupled editing experiences. Yet, in the new era of Gutenberg, Just Write’s alternative writing interface offers a simplicity that some users may prefer.

“As the WordPress admin continues to grow and become more complex, some people get excited and others moan and grown,” Bobich said. “But building something like Just Write shows us that there’s more to WordPress than just what we see. There’s more than a menu full of plugins and a new editor built in React that we may or may not like. WordPress can be what we want. It can fit our own needs or any client’s. And this all comes from the potential ability to decouple the editing experience.”

As WordPress has evolved to accommodate different user types from blogging, websites, and niche applications, Bobich said he thinks the next logical step is for developers to begin creating admin interfaces catered specifically to users’ individual needs.

“Gutenberg marks an important turn in the evolution,” Bobich said. “For those that were clinging to the simplicity of WordPress and blocking out some of the other noise, this might not be something they end up liking… or maybe it will?

“But the bigger point is that what we see there in the admin doesn’t have to be it. I hope people will be braver than me and really set out to build these different alternatives. If I can polish my React skills and build that myself in 10 days, I can only imagine what others can do.”

Dev Blog: WordPress 4.9.7 Security and Maintenance Release

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 07/05/2018 - 17:00

WordPress 4.9.7 is now available. This is a security and maintenance release for all versions since WordPress 3.7. We strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately.

WordPress versions 4.9.6 and earlier are affected by a media issue that could potentially allow a user with certain capabilities to attempt to delete files outside the uploads directory.

Thank you to Slavco for reporting the original issue and Matt Barry for reporting related issues.

Seventeen other bugs were fixed in WordPress 4.9.7. Particularly of note were:

  • Taxonomy: Improve cache handling for term queries.
  • Posts, Post Types: Clear post password cookie when logging out.
  • Widgets: Allow basic HTML tags in sidebar descriptions on Widgets admin screen.
  • Community Events Dashboard: Always show the nearest WordCamp if one is coming up, even if there are multiple Meetups happening first.
  • Privacy: Make sure default privacy policy content does not cause a fatal error when flushing rewrite rules outside of the admin context.

Download WordPress 4.9.7 or venture over to Dashboard → Updates and click “Update Now.” Sites that support automatic background updates are already beginning to update automatically.

The previously scheduled 4.9.7 is now referred to as 4.9.8, and will follow the release schedule posted yesterday.

Thank you to everyone who contributed to WordPress 4.9.7:

1naveengiri, Aaron Jorbin, abdullahramzan, alejandroxlopez, Andrew Ozz, Arun, Birgir Erlendsson (birgire), BjornW, Boone Gorges, Brandon Kraft, Chetan Prajapati, David Herrera, Felix Arntz, Gareth, Ian Dunn, ibelanger, John Blackbourn, Jonathan Desrosiers, Joy, khaihong, lbenicio, Leander Iversen, mermel, metalandcoffee, Migrated to @jeffpaul, palmiak, Sergey Biryukov, skoldin, Subrata Sarkar, Towhidul Islam, warmlaundry, and YuriV.

WordPress 4.9.7 Security and Maintenance Release

Wordpress News - Thu, 07/05/2018 - 17:00

WordPress 4.9.7 is now available. This is a security and maintenance release for all versions since WordPress 3.7. We strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately.

WordPress versions 4.9.6 and earlier are affected by a media issue that could potentially allow a user with certain capabilities to attempt to delete files outside the uploads directory.

Thank you to Slavco for reporting the original issue and Matt Barry for reporting related issues.

Seventeen other bugs were fixed in WordPress 4.9.7. Particularly of note were:

  • Taxonomy: Improve cache handling for term queries.
  • Posts, Post Types: Clear post password cookie when logging out.
  • Widgets: Allow basic HTML tags in sidebar descriptions on Widgets admin screen.
  • Community Events Dashboard: Always show the nearest WordCamp if one is coming up, even if there are multiple Meetups happening first.
  • Privacy: Make sure default privacy policy content does not cause a fatal error when flushing rewrite rules outside of the admin context.

Download WordPress 4.9.7 or venture over to Dashboard → Updates and click “Update Now.” Sites that support automatic background updates are already beginning to update automatically.

The previously scheduled 4.9.7 is now referred to as 4.9.8, and will follow the release schedule posted yesterday.

Thank you to everyone who contributed to WordPress 4.9.7:

1naveengiri, Aaron Jorbin, abdullahramzan, alejandroxlopez, Andrew Ozz, Arun, Birgir Erlendsson (birgire), BjornW, Boone Gorges, Brandon Kraft, Chetan Prajapati, David Herrera, Felix Arntz, Gareth, Ian Dunn, ibelanger, John Blackbourn, Jonathan Desrosiers, Joy, khaihong, lbenicio, Leander Iversen, mermel, metalandcoffee, Migrated to @jeffpaul, palmiak, Sergey Biryukov, skoldin, Subrata Sarkar, Towhidul Islam, warmlaundry, and YuriV.

SimpleBlog

Drupal Themes - Wed, 07/04/2018 - 20:52

Simple Blog is a new and clean, grid responsive Drupal 8 theme on the web.
This theme can be used for drupal 8 to create your powerful blogging website with grid layout.

Features:

  • Responsive Blog
  • Simple clean design
  • Grid Layout (Masonry grid layout library)
  • With/without Grid Layout using Configuration
  • Supports 3-columns layout

Future Release :

  • Dropdown menu.

HeroPress: Coding under trees and in 24 hour coffee shops

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 07/04/2018 - 18:30

People were paying me to write code two years before I had wifi in my house. Home wifi would have cost $45 a month. The cable company wanted a $100 deposit to create my account. It wasn’t going to happen, I could get wifi with a cup of coffee for $3 (including the tip) at a coffee shop a few blocks away from my place that meant I got some semblance of being social. I couldn’t imagine giving up 15 days a month at coffee shops just so it was easier to work from home, not when I could get away with sitting on my porch poaching wifi from my neighbors when I got stuck and had to google regular expressions for the 400th time. Or, my favorite, sit in a park down the street where there were three unprotected wifi networks and a strong tree to lean against.

My path to becoming a web developer started when I packed up my beat up Chevy Prizm and drove to Portland, Oregon. I had graduated college with degrees in Economics and Political Science. While there, I become a Linux user when I discovered that it used less space meaning I had more space for music. I had never written code, but when my friends and I decided we wanted to create our version of The Onion, I started searching. After a little bit of trial ( blogger ) and error ( blogger ), I found WordPress and it’s “Famous Five Minute Install”. I purchased a domain and hosting from a place that advertised heavily and set about creating our site.

The public library was my initial source of information. After all, having fun isn’t hard when you’ve got a library card. I picked up books on CSS, PHP, Java, Database design, and anything I could get my hands on. I was working evenings as an usher for the Portland Trailblazers and would head over to a 24 hour coffee shop to cowboy code under fluorescent lights until I was ready to crash.

I can think of three big breaks that really helped move me along. Each of these ended up being “Flash Forward” moments where I was able to grow.

My First Client

I was scouring craigslist looking for anything I could get my hands on when I found someone offering $25 to move their WordPress site from one domain to another. Having just done that, I sent an email and crossed my fingers. Somehow, my eagerness (and likely willingness to work for peanuts) got my their trust. I had my first client. It took me way longer than I would have hoped as I learned about things like DNS Propagation, but I completed the task. And did such a good job that I was asked if I could build a website for one of their friends who was a standup comic. I was honest that I had never built a real site from scratch, but they liked how I had communicated, so I got the gig.

My First Core Experience

Before the first time I contributed to WordPress, I went to the Portland WordPress User Group to ask if something I was seeing was possibly an issue that warranted emailing the wp-hackers mailing list. I was so scared of being wrong that I felt like I needed to ask permission. I assumed that I was going to make a fool of myself and be laughed at. I ended up emailing the list and it turned out, I had found a spot where WordPress could be better! In the grand scheme of WordPress, passing a parameter to three `do_action` calls didn’t help WordPress gain 1% of market share, but it did help me with the plugin I was working on. And I was exposed to the process. I learned about trac, and the weekly devchat, and patches and svn. While I didn’t get props, I still consider this my first contribution to WordPress Core.

My first WordCamp

WordCamps are cheap compared to most tech conferences, but when you are playing the game of “How do I eat on $10 a week” for months on end, $40 for a conference whose value is unknown is a hard sell. Luckily, the Portland WordPress User Group did a raffle for a ticket and I won. All I had to pay for was the $2 in bus fare each way and I had the chance to learn. The 2009 WordCamp Portland ended up being where Matt Mullenweg announced that WPMU was going to be merged into core in WordPress 3.0 and it’s where I saw a talk entitled “How Not to Build a WordPress Plugin” by Will Norris. Will’s talk exposed me to WordPress development in a way that I would never have imagined on my own. It helped me level up from someone who mostly was copy and pasting PHP to someone who was writing code.

Additionally, I was able to network for the first time. It no longer was the same 15 people who went to the meetup, it was now about 200 WordPress fanatics, many who wanted to hire someone like me to work on their website!

Looking back, these flash forward moments contributed almost as much to luck to my success. In many ways, a lot of my success can be attributed to the luck of being born as someone who is essentially a white cis-male into a family where I was exposed to computers and had a chance to gain a solid liberal arts education.

But it’s not just that luck that helped me. I had to provide good customer service to turn a $25 task into a contract to build my first website. I had to be willing to embarrass myself by asking what I thought was a dumb question. I had to show up and become a part of my local community to get a ticket for a conference where I learned and networked.

Soon after WordCamp Portland 2009, I had enough client work coming in that it made sense to have wifi. Home wifi meant I could start being connected to the WordPress community more than once a month in person or a few hours here and there at coffee shops. It meant I could read dev chat every week and eventually it meant I could earn props. Networking at meetups, WordCamps and conferences led to full time jobs. Taking risks and being willing to look like a fool in front of the WordPress community have enabled me to become a WordPress Core committer (and sometimes continue to look like a fool). In addition to volunteering on WordPress Core, I’m now the Director of Editorial Technology for Penske Media Corporation where I help brands like Rolling Stone and Variety run on WordPress, but I’ll never forget when if I needed to code, I was going to sit under trees in parks or the fluorescent lights of a 24 hour coffee shop.

The post Coding under trees and in 24 hour coffee shops appeared first on HeroPress.

WPTavern: WordCamp Incubator Program 2018 to Host Events in Montevideo, Uruguay and Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 07/03/2018 - 03:41
The Pocitos neighborhood of Montevideo, Uruguay. Skyline from the shore -photo credit: Rimbaldine

The WordCamp Incubator Program has selected Montevideo, Uruguay and Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia to host WordCamps in 2018. The program provides a jump start for new WordPress communities where meetups have not yet been well-established. Montevideo and Kota Kinabalu were selected from a short list of 14 communities that had been whittled down from 104 applications for the program.

WordPress Community Deputies will co-lead the events and mentor a local team that will organize a one-track WordCamp with approximately 50-75 attendees. The goal is to empower the new organizers and the fledgling communities to host more local events, ideally regular meetups and an annual WordCamp. Mentors will assist in finding speakers and sponsors. A global sponsorship grant will cover 100% of the events’ costs, relieving the organizers of the burden of local fundraising.

WordPress Community Team member Rocío Valdivia announced the program’s new cities for 2018 and said she anticipates the events will happen in the last quarter of this year. Local co-leads have been charged with starting a monthly meetup group before setting a date for the new WordCamps.

Round 2 of the WordCamp Incubator Program follows up a successful run in 2016 that brought WordCamps to Denpasar, Harare, and Medellín. Harare hosted its second WordCamp in 2017 and a 2018 camp is in the early planning stages. This particular African community, along with the neighboring Nairobi community (on the short list in 2016), are strong examples of how the incubator program can provide a boost in areas of the world where the WordPress community is not yet deeply rooted.

WPTavern: Block Unit Test Plugin Helps WordPress Theme Developers Prepare for Gutenberg

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 07/02/2018 - 21:43

ThemeBeans founder Rich Tabor has released a new plugin called Block Unit Test for Gutenberg that helps theme authors test their themes for Gutenberg-readiness. It is similar to the Theme Unit Test but is limited to testing Gutenberg blocks.

After installing and activating both Gutenberg and sBlock Unit Test, the plugin creates a new page as a draft with an example of every core Gutenblock. This makes it easy to see how the blocks will appear on the frontend of any theme. Block Unit Test also includes variations on the core blocks with different alignment and column settings applied.

Tabor said he knew it would be advantageous to start using/writing in Gutenberg daily to better understand what he needed to do to make his products at ThemeBeans compatible.

“I added initial support for Gutenberg in my Tabor WordPress theme, as I use it on my own personal blog with Gutenberg,” he said. “I needed a way to easily test each of the core Gutenberg blocks (and eventually third-party blocks) without having to manually add them every time I wanted to test something. As Gutenberg blocks get more dynamic and complicated, it’s a bit trickier to test for – as many blocks have different variations/styles/columns/grids/etc.”

Tabor took inspiration from the Theme Unit Test and created Block Unit Test with Gutenblock variations included. He is using the plugin while preparing the 20+ themes in his ThemeBeans catalog to support Gutenberg. He wrote the plugin to be extensible and made it open source on GitHub for other developers and theme shops to use.

Theme developers can install Block Unit Test as a first step towards making sure the front-end styles match the editor styles. This will be essential to making the transition process easier for new Gutenberg users once WordPress 5.0 ships. Tabor also published a tutorial for adding WordPress Theme Styles to Gutenberg to help others get started.

In getting his first theme compatible, Tabor said he relied heavily on the Gutenberg Handbook, as well as following discussions on the Gutenberg GitHub repository.

“It’s not terribly difficult to add support for Gutenberg, although applying proper theme styles within the Gutenberg editor is a bit of task — there’s so much that can be accidentally overlooked,” Tabor said. “For the theme side of things, there wasn’t much technical leveling-up — though developing blocks is a different story. I did need to raise the bar and dive deeply into the world of Javascript, though looking at the block examples on the GitHub repository really helped me along.”

Tabor said he started “living and breathing all things Gutenberg” after WordCamp US 2017, and began writing development articles while learning the ropes. He created several projects focused on the new editor, including Writy, a Gutenberg-centric writing experience for publishers, and Co-Blocks, a beta suite of Gutenberg blocks for content marketers.

“As a founder of a theme shop it was apparent that I needed to hone in on Gutenberg and level-up my knowledge, technical skills, and consequently my products, in order to compete in a post-Gutenberg era of WordPress,” Tabor said.

“I believe the foundation of the future of WordPress lies in the success of Gutenberg. I use the new editor just about daily now. I know it’s a great move in the right direction and I’m doing my part to make sure folks using my themes can experience everything that Gutenberg has to offer.”

Dev Blog: The Month in WordPress: June 2018

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 07/02/2018 - 09:28

With one of the two flagship WordCamp events taking place this month, as well as some important WordPress project announcements, there’s no shortage of news. Learn more about what happened in the WordPress community in June.

Another Successful WordCamp Europe

On June 14th, WordCamp Europe kicked off three days of learning and contributions in Belgrade. Over 2,000 people attended in person, with hundreds more watching live streams of the sessions.

The WordCamp was a great success with plenty of first-time attendees and new WordPress contributors getting involved in the project and community. Recorded sessions from the 65 speakers at the event will be available on WordPress.tv in the coming weeks. In the meantime, check out the photos from the event.

The next WordCamp Europe takes place on June 20-22 2019 in Berlin, Germany. If you’re based in Europe and would like to serve on the organizing team, fill in the application form.

Updated Roadmap for the New WordPress Content Editor

During his keynote session at WordCamp Europe, Matt Mullenweg presented an updated roadmap for Gutenberg, the new content editor coming in WordPress 5.0.

While the editor is in rapid development, with v3.1 being released this past month, the team is aiming to ship Gutenberg with WordPress Core in August, 2018. This is not set in stone — the release date may shift as development progresses — but this gives the first realistic idea of when we can expect the editor to be released.

If you would like to contribute to Gutenberg, read the handbook, follow the Core team blog, and join the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

WordCamp Incubator Cities Announced

The WordCamp Incubator program helps spread WordPress to underserved communities by providing organizing support for their first WordCamp. The first iteration of this program ran successfully in 2016 and empowered three cities to start their own WordPress communities.

This year, the Community Team is running the Incubator program again. After receiving applications from 104 communities, they have selected Montevideo, Uruguay and Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia to participate in the program. Both cities will receive direct help from experienced WordCamp organizers to run their first-ever WordCamp as a way to help their WordPress community get started.

To find out more about the Incubator program follow the Community team blog, and join the #community-events channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

Further Reading:
  • The WordPress community of Spain recently received an award for being the best open-source community in the country.
  • This month, WordPress reached the milestone of powering 31% of websites.
  • WP Rig is a brand new tool to help WordPress developers build better themes.
  • Block Unit Test is a new plugin to help theme developers prepare for Gutenberg.
  • Near the end of the month, Zac Gordon hosted an online conference focused on JavaScript development in WordPress – the session videos will be available on YouTube soon.

If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.

The Month in WordPress: June 2018

Wordpress News - Mon, 07/02/2018 - 09:28

With one of the two flagship WordCamp events taking place this month, as well as some important WordPress project announcements, there’s no shortage of news. Learn more about what happened in the WordPress community in June.

Another Successful WordCamp Europe

On June 14th, WordCamp Europe kicked off three days of learning and contributions in Belgrade. Over 2,000 people attended in person, with hundreds more watching live streams of the sessions.

The WordCamp was a great success with plenty of first-time attendees and new WordPress contributors getting involved in the project and community. Recorded sessions from the 65 speakers at the event will be available on WordPress.tv in the coming weeks. In the meantime, check out the photos from the event.

The next WordCamp Europe takes place on June 20-22 2019 in Berlin, Germany. If you’re based in Europe and would like to serve on the organizing team, fill in the application form.

Updated Roadmap for the New WordPress Content Editor

During his keynote session at WordCamp Europe, Matt Mullenweg presented an updated roadmap for Gutenberg, the new content editor coming in WordPress 5.0.

While the editor is in rapid development, with v3.1 being released this past month, the team is aiming to ship Gutenberg with WordPress Core in August, 2018. This is not set in stone — the release date may shift as development progresses — but this gives the first realistic idea of when we can expect the editor to be released.

If you would like to contribute to Gutenberg, read the handbook, follow the Core team blog, and join the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

WordCamp Incubator Cities Announced

The WordCamp Incubator program helps spread WordPress to underserved communities by providing organizing support for their first WordCamp. The first iteration of this program ran successfully in 2016 and empowered three cities to start their own WordPress communities.

This year, the Community Team is running the Incubator program again. After receiving applications from 104 communities, they have selected Montevideo, Uruguay and Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia to participate in the program. Both cities will receive direct help from experienced WordCamp organizers to run their first-ever WordCamp as a way to help their WordPress community get started.

To find out more about the Incubator program follow the Community team blog, and join the #community-events channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

Further Reading:
  • The WordPress community of Spain recently received an award for being the best open-source community in the country.
  • This month, WordPress reached the milestone of powering 31% of websites.
  • WP Rig is a brand new tool to help WordPress developers build better themes.
  • Block Unit Test is a new plugin to help theme developers prepare for Gutenberg.
  • Near the end of the month, Zac Gordon hosted an online conference focused on JavaScript development in WordPress – the session videos will be available on YouTube soon.

If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.

Matt: Work and Play

Wordpress Planet - Sun, 07/01/2018 - 01:13

A master in the art of living draws no sharp distinction between his work and his play; his labor and his leisure; his mind and his body; his education and his recreation. He hardly knows which is which. He simply pursues his vision of excellence through whatever he is doing, and leaves others to determine whether he is working or playing. To himself, he always appears to be doing both.

Lawrence Pearsall Jacks in Education through Recreation, 1932

Post Status: An Abundance of Acquisitions — Draft Podcast

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 06/29/2018 - 22:11

Welcome to the Post Status Draft podcast, which you can find on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, and via RSS for your favorite podcatcher. Post Status Draft is hosted by Brian Krogsgard and co-host Brian Richards.

In this episode, the Brians have a chat about a number of different acquisitions that have occurred in the WordPress space over these past few weeks. Listen in as they unpack some of the news surrounding StudioPress, WPEngine, Automattic, WPNinjas, Prospress, and AutomateWoo. Check out our episode links for further stories about each of those businesses as well as the virtual JavaScript for WordPress conference taking place live on July 29.

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WPTavern: WCEU Panel Discusses Progressive WordPress Themes, AMP, and Gutenberg

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 06/29/2018 - 22:03

Progressive themes was a hot topic at WordCamp Europe 2018. During the event I had the opportunity to set up a panel with four experts who are working to integrate progressive web development practices more deeply in WordPress core, plugins, and themes. These practices make it possible for a website (or app) to work offline, load quickly, deliver content on unreliable networks, and use device-specific features to provide a better experience for the user. The PWA (progressive web app) created for WordCamp Europe is a good example of this in action.

Thierry Muller, Alberto Medina, Weston Ruter, and Morten Rand-Hendriksen joined me for an interview, exploring the future of WordPress themes in the era of progressive web development. (see video below)

“At the most abstract level, it’s all about user experience,” Medina said. “How do we maximize the pleasure that our users get when they use our websites? And delightfulness in this context means things like performance, speed, having content that isn’t blocked. If you think about themes built according to those principles, then we are basically seeking an awesome user experience in WordPress.”

It’s not yet clear what this will look like for the WordPress theme landscape, as current solutions are somewhat fragmented. WordPress contributors are working to standardize progressive technologies in core so the ecosystem can collaborate better together.

“There are many progressive themes being built these days,” Medina said. “One of the problems that is happening is that there is a lot of fragmentation. There’s a lot of plugins that are using service workers but in their own ways. What we want is to say, ‘This is the best way to do things,’ this is a uniform API to do it, and then enable progressive theme developers to take advantage of the core functionality.”

Currently, the prospect of setting up a WordPress site that uses progressive web technologies would be a daunting task for regular users, even if they are implementing existing solutions.

“There’s also a user aspect of it, because the people for whom we design WordPress, plugins, and themes, are the people who actually publish their own content onto the web,” Rand-Hendriksen said. “There’s a really valid question in how much should they need to know about how the web works to be able to publish some content. When they spin up a WordPress site, should we impose on them to know that they need to add all these optimization plugins and do all this other stuff just to make the site work properly? How much of that can be offloaded onto the theme itself, or plugins, or even WordPress core?”

The members of the panel are working together to on various projects and core contributions that will standardize the use of progressive enhancement technologies in WordPress.

“The goal is to have a common API for service workers so that plugins and themes can each install their own logic, just like they can enqueque their own scripts today,” Ruter said. “Also to be able to enqueue their own service workers and then core can manage the combination of them, as well as having a common app manifest that plugins and themes can collaborate on and have a single output into the page.”

This is how Rand-Hendriksen’s WP Rig starter theme project came about – to help developers take advantage of these best practices in the meantime, without having to figure out how to put all the pieces together.

“WP Rig gives you the platform to build a progressive theme that uses all the latest performance and WordPress best practices, in a convenient package, and over time it will evolve with these new progressive technologies,” Rand-Hendriksen said.

We also discussed AMP and Gutenberg compatibility, core support for web app manifests, and how the commercial theme industry will react to these new technologies. Check out the full interview in the video below.

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