Wordpress News

A New Design is Coming to WordPress News

Wordpress News - Thu, 06/03/2021 - 20:47

After many years of a tidy, white-space filled design on WordPress.org/news it’s time to bring new life to the way we present our content. So much has changed since this site was first created: the people who read it, the type and variety of what is published, even the way WordPress works has changed.

Which means it makes sense to change our theme.

Earlier this year, Matt requested a new design from Beatriz Fialho (who also created the State of the Word slides for 2020). The design keeps a clean, white-space friendly format while incorporating a more jazzy, playful feeling with a refreshed color palette.

More detail on this modern exploration have been posted on make.wordpress.org/design. I encourage you to stop by and read more about the thoughts behind the coming updates; and keep an eye out for the new look here and across WordPress.org!

WPTavern: Forks and Alternatives: Custom User Avatar Plugins for WordPress

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 06/03/2021 - 01:33

You know what one of the great things about open source is? Others can use a project’s code, share it wholesale, modify it, and/or distribute their changes. These are the pillars upon which WordPress stands. It is a beautiful thing to watch in practice.

Most often, it means we can build off the shoulders of those giants who came before us, continually improving the software for ourselves and others. It is how WordPress got its start nearly two decades ago as a fork of the b2/cafelog blogging system.

Sometimes, it just means having the freedom to give your friend a copy of something you love and letting them use it. Other times, it is the gateway for a budding developer learning how functions or classes work for the first time, ripping apart a project to see what makes it tick.

Every so often, the promise of free software means that others can decide to go their own way when they do not like the direction a project is heading. They can fork the code, carving a new destination for its future.

This is what happened when ProfilePress overhauled its WP User Avatar plugin, turning it into a full-fledged membership solution. While its average user may not be able or willing to dip their toes into the depths of the development waters, when you have a 400,000+ user base, a few of them are bound to be programmers. Or at least tech-savvy enough to create a copy of the previous version and distribute it directly.

It did not take long — mere days — before ex-users began sharing their forks. The beauty of open source is that they have the power to do this without some corporation cracking down on them. I wanted to acknowledge what they accomplished by jumping into a messy situation and making quick alternatives for many users who felt abandoned. This is my symbolic handclap. 👏

It is not often that we get to mention WordPress’s license without gearing up for battle. However, the GPL played a crucial role in making these forks possible. The license protected the plugin’s user base, giving them multiple alternative paths to take.

Without further preaching the merits of open source, the following are the current forks of WP User Avatar:

  • One User Avatar by Daniel Tara (One Designs). It already has nine translations and is available on WordPress.org.
  • Custom User Avatar by David Artiss. It is currently available on GitHub, but it appears he plans to add it to the plugin directory.
  • Orig User Avatar by Philipp Stracker. This one is also only available on GitHub.

Each fork looks like a straight port of the latest version of WP User Avatar before version 3.0. There are some necessary code and branding changes. The first two also remove all advertising from the plugin.

For anyone looking to return to the exact same functionality as the old plugin, any one of these will do the job.

Alternative Solutions

Straight ports are nice to have, especially for those who need to keep their data intact for many user accounts, but this could also be an opportunity for others to look at alternatives. And, custom user avatar solutions are a dime a dozen. There is a little something for everyone out there.

The following is nowhere near a comprehensive list. I have either tested or used most of these in the past couple of years. I encourage anyone to share plugins I did not include in the comments.

Simple Local Avatars

Topping any list of custom avatar solutions is Simple Local Avatars by 10up. The WordPress company is one of the most respected in the community, and its employees contribute heavily to core development. 10up tends to put together solid plugins.

Simple Local Avatars does just what it says on the box. It allows users to upload custom avatars to their site. It also generates requested image sizes on demand. It works alongside Gravatar, a feature that can be enabled or disabled. It also has built-in options for site administrators to grant permission to non-authorized roles to upload their photos.

WP User Avatars

WP User Avatars by John James Jacoby, a lead developer for bbPress and BuddyPress, is another simple plugin. Like many similar solutions, it adds a form for users to manage their avatar from their profile pages.

It is unique in that it works alongside a suite of other user-related plugins that Jacoby offers. While it can work on its own, it is at least worth checking out his WP User Profiles plugin, which overhauls WordPress profile pages. It and his other user-related plugins work in conjunction with each other. Plugin users can pick and choose which they wish to install.

User Profile Picture

There seems to be a pattern emerging here — users tend to love these simple avatar solutions. User Profile Picture by Cozmoslabs is another that fits this mold. It also includes a block to allow post or page authors to output any user’s profile (avatar, name, description, and posts link) on the site front end.

Users without permission to upload an image cannot add an avatar with this plugin alone. By default, this is the Administrator, Editor, and Author roles. Site admins will need to install either a permissions plugin or Cozmoslabs’ Profile Builder for the extra capability.

Pixel Avatars (Toolbelt)

Pixel Avatars is a privacy-first Gravatar replacement. It takes a different route than similar options by not providing a method to upload a custom avatar. Instead, it automatically generates unique avatars for each user with a bit of JavaScript. It is a fun twist on the typical avatar system.

Technically, this is not a standalone avatar plugin. The Pixel Avatars system is a sub-component of the Toolbelt plugin. Created by Ben Gillbanks, it is a collection of tools that he uses for most of his WordPress projects. It may be overkill for many, but each plugin module can be enabled or disabled based on user needs.

Local Gravatars

This plugin is also different from other solutions because it does not allow local avatar uploading. However, it is a solid alternative for those who just need faster load times, especially on posts that display dozens or hundreds of Gravatar images in the comments.

Local Gravatars by Ari Stathopoulos is a caching system. It stores Gravatar images on the user’s server for a week before flushing them out. This can make for a performance boost instead of hitting the Gravatar CDN for each image.

WPTavern: Forks and Alternatives: Custom User Avatar Plugins for WordPress

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 06/03/2021 - 01:33

You know what one of the great things about open source is? Others can use a project’s code, share it wholesale, modify it, and/or distribute their changes. These are the pillars upon which WordPress stands. It is a beautiful thing to watch in practice.

Most often, it means we can build off the shoulders of those giants who came before us, continually improving the software for ourselves and others. It is how WordPress got its start nearly two decades ago as a fork of the b2/cafelog blogging system.

Sometimes, it just means having the freedom to give your friend a copy of something you love and letting them use it. Other times, it is the gateway for a budding developer learning how functions or classes work for the first time, ripping apart a project to see what makes it tick.

Every so often, the promise of free software means that others can decide to go their own way when they do not like the direction a project is heading. They can fork the code, carving a new destination for its future.

This is what happened when ProfilePress overhauled its WP User Avatar plugin, turning it into a full-fledged membership solution. While its average user may not be able or willing to dip their toes into the depths of the development waters, when you have a 400,000+ user base, a few of them are bound to be programmers. Or at least tech-savvy enough to create a copy of the previous version and distribute it directly.

It did not take long — mere days — before ex-users began sharing their forks. The beauty of open source is that they have the power to do this without some corporation cracking down on them. I wanted to acknowledge what they accomplished by jumping into a messy situation and making quick alternatives for many users who felt abandoned. This is my symbolic handclap. 👏

It is not often that we get to mention WordPress’s license without gearing up for battle. However, the GPL played a crucial role in making these forks possible. The license protected the plugin’s user base, giving them multiple alternative paths to take.

Without further preaching the merits of open source, the following are the current forks of WP User Avatar:

  • One User Avatar by Daniel Tara (One Designs). It already has nine translations and is available on WordPress.org.
  • Custom User Avatar by David Artiss. It is currently available on GitHub, but it appears he plans to add it to the plugin directory.
  • Orig User Avatar by Philipp Stracker. This one is also only available on GitHub.

Each fork looks like a straight port of the latest version of WP User Avatar before version 3.0. There are some necessary code and branding changes. The first two also remove all advertising from the plugin.

For anyone looking to return to the exact same functionality as the old plugin, any one of these will do the job.

Alternative Solutions

Straight ports are nice to have, especially for those who need to keep their data intact for many user accounts, but this could also be an opportunity for others to look at alternatives. And, custom user avatar solutions are a dime a dozen. There is a little something for everyone out there.

The following is nowhere near a comprehensive list. I have either tested or used most of these in the past couple of years. I encourage anyone to share plugins I did not include in the comments.

Simple Local Avatars

Topping any list of custom avatar solutions is Simple Local Avatars by 10up. The WordPress company is one of the most respected in the community, and its employees contribute heavily to core development. 10up tends to put together solid plugins.

Simple Local Avatars does just what it says on the box. It allows users to upload custom avatars to their site. It also generates requested image sizes on demand. It works alongside Gravatar, a feature that can be enabled or disabled. It also has built-in options for site administrators to grant permission to non-authorized roles to upload their photos.

WP User Avatars

WP User Avatars by John James Jacoby, a lead developer for bbPress and BuddyPress, is another simple plugin. Like many similar solutions, it adds a form for users to manage their avatar from their profile pages.

It is unique in that it works alongside a suite of other user-related plugins that Jacoby offers. While it can work on its own, it is at least worth checking out his WP User Profiles plugin, which overhauls WordPress profile pages. It and his other user-related plugins work in conjunction with each other. Plugin users can pick and choose which they wish to install.

User Profile Picture

There seems to be a pattern emerging here — users tend to love these simple avatar solutions. User Profile Picture by Cozmoslabs is another that fits this mold. It also includes a block to allow post or page authors to output any user’s profile (avatar, name, description, and posts link) on the site front end.

Users without permission to upload an image cannot add an avatar with this plugin alone. By default, this is the Administrator, Editor, and Author roles. Site admins will need to install either a permissions plugin or Cozmoslabs’ Profile Builder for the extra capability.

Pixel Avatars (Toolbelt)

Pixel Avatars is a privacy-first Gravatar replacement. It takes a different route than similar options by not providing a method to upload a custom avatar. Instead, it automatically generates unique avatars for each user with a bit of JavaScript. It is a fun twist on the typical avatar system.

Technically, this is not a standalone avatar plugin. The Pixel Avatars system is a sub-component of the Toolbelt plugin. Created by Ben Gillbanks, it is a collection of tools that he uses for most of his WordPress projects. It may be overkill for many, but each plugin module can be enabled or disabled based on user needs.

Local Gravatars

This plugin is also different from other solutions because it does not allow local avatar uploading. However, it is a solid alternative for those who just need faster load times, especially on posts that display dozens or hundreds of Gravatar images in the comments.

Local Gravatars by Ari Stathopoulos is a caching system. It stores Gravatar images on the user’s server for a week before flushing them out. This can make for a performance boost instead of hitting the Gravatar CDN for each image.

WPTavern: WordCamp Europe 2021 Online Schedule Announced

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 06/03/2021 - 01:07

Mark your calendars for the next major WordPress event coming up at the beginning of next week. WordCamp Europe is just five days away and will run from June 7-9. In July 2020, organizers announced that in-person events would not resume until 2022. At that time, attendees were deeply disappointed but resigned to the necessity of online events due to the pandemic.

One of the advantages of scheduling a virtual event so far in advance is that organizers have been able to eliminate a great deal of uncertainty for attendees and their travel arrangements as well as have more time to create a better online experience. This is one of the few times in WordCamp Europe history where all attendees will be joining virtually, on equal footing from wherever they are in the world.

WCEU 2021 organizers have announced the speaker lineup and schedule for the upcoming three days of 30-minute sessions, 10-minute lightning talks, workshops, discussion panels, and interviews. Two tracks will run simultaneously.

The schedule includes some big-picture topics like full-site editing and the future of WordPress themes, as well as more technical topics such as how to quickly build custom blocks, setting up a WooCommerce data hub, headless WordPress, and accessing APIs using OAuth on the Federated Web. At the close of day 3, WordPress co-founder Matt Mullenweg will join the event for a virtual chat.

Business owners, project managers, designers, and other professionals will all find topics related to their work and interests. The schedule has a built-in favoriting tool so attendees can mark the sessions they plan to attend and then print or email to themselves for a personalized schedule. Every hour or so there will be 10-minute breaks so attendees will have time to talk with others and socialize. WCEU organizers are planning to host virtual networking rooms where attendees can meet sponsors and take part in product demos.

Registration is free and attendees will receive online goodiebags. Tickets are still available but organizers expect it to be another “sell out” year.

WPTavern: WordCamp Europe 2021 Online Schedule Announced

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 06/03/2021 - 01:07

Mark your calendars for the next major WordPress event coming up at the beginning of next week. WordCamp Europe is just five days away and will run from June 7-9. In July 2020, organizers announced that in-person events would not resume until 2022. At that time, attendees were deeply disappointed but resigned to the necessity of online events due to the pandemic.

One of the advantages of scheduling a virtual event so far in advance is that organizers have been able to eliminate a great deal of uncertainty for attendees and their travel arrangements as well as have more time to create a better online experience. This is one of the few times in WordCamp Europe history where all attendees will be joining virtually, on equal footing from wherever they are in the world.

WCEU 2021 organizers have announced the speaker lineup and schedule for the upcoming three days of 30-minute sessions, 10-minute lightning talks, workshops, discussion panels, and interviews. Two tracks will run simultaneously.

The schedule includes some big-picture topics like full-site editing and the future of WordPress themes, as well as more technical topics such as how to quickly build custom blocks, setting up a WooCommerce data hub, headless WordPress, and accessing APIs using OAuth on the Federated Web. At the close of day 3, WordPress co-founder Matt Mullenweg will join the event for a virtual chat.

Business owners, project managers, designers, and other professionals will all find topics related to their work and interests. The schedule has a built-in favoriting tool so attendees can mark the sessions they plan to attend and then print or email to themselves for a personalized schedule. Every hour or so there will be 10-minute breaks so attendees will have time to talk with others and socialize. WCEU organizers are planning to host virtual networking rooms where attendees can meet sponsors and take part in product demos.

Registration is free and attendees will receive online goodiebags. Tickets are still available but organizers expect it to be another “sell out” year.

WPTavern: WordCamp Europe 2021 Online Schedule Announced

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 06/03/2021 - 01:07

Mark your calendars for the next major WordPress event coming up at the beginning of next week. WordCamp Europe is just five days away and will run from June 7-9. In July 2020, organizers announced that in-person events would not resume until 2022. At that time, attendees were deeply disappointed but resigned to the necessity of online events due to the pandemic.

One of the advantages of scheduling a virtual event so far in advance is that organizers have been able to eliminate a great deal of uncertainty for attendees and their travel arrangements as well as have more time to create a better online experience. This is one of the few times in WordCamp Europe history where all attendees will be joining virtually, on equal footing from wherever they are in the world.

WCEU 2021 organizers have announced the speaker lineup and schedule for the upcoming three days of 30-minute sessions, 10-minute lightning talks, workshops, discussion panels, and interviews. Two tracks will run simultaneously.

The schedule includes some big-picture topics like full-site editing and the future of WordPress themes, as well as more technical topics such as how to quickly build custom blocks, setting up a WooCommerce data hub, headless WordPress, and accessing APIs using OAuth on the Federated Web. At the close of day 3, WordPress co-founder Matt Mullenweg will join the event for a virtual chat.

Business owners, project managers, designers, and other professionals will all find topics related to their work and interests. The schedule has a built-in favoriting tool so attendees can mark the sessions they plan to attend and then print or email to themselves for a personalized schedule. Every hour or so there will be 10-minute breaks so attendees will have time to talk with others and socialize. WCEU organizers are planning to host virtual networking rooms where attendees can meet sponsors and take part in product demos.

Registration is free and attendees will receive online goodiebags. Tickets are still available but organizers expect it to be another “sell out” year.

WordPress.org blog: The Month in WordPress: May 2021

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 06/02/2021 - 18:23

It’s really fun to contribute to something larger than yourself.

Matt Mullenweg’s words in “The Commons of Images” episode of the WP Briefing podcast exemplify the core philosophy of the WordPress project,  especially as we inch closer to the next major release (version 5.8). This post covers exciting updates from the month of May.

WordPress turns 18

WordPress celebrated the 18th anniversary of its launch on May 27, 2021. To celebrate 40+ releases and WordPress’ support of 40% of the web, the team released 40 milestones to celebrate the anniversary of the software. Here’s to the next 18 and beyond! 

CC Search joins WordPress and is renamed to Openverse

Creative Commons Search has officially joined the WordPress project. Creative Commons Search (CC Search) is a CC0 image search engine with over 500 million openly licensed images. The search product, which is being renamed to Openverse, will eventually live on the URL: https://wordpress.org/openverse. Contributors working on CC Search will continue their work as part of a new dedicated Make team: https://make.wordpress.org/openverse. Check out “The Commons of Images” podcast episode for more information.

WordPress 5.7.2 released

WordPress version 5.7.2, a short-cycle security release, came out on May 13. Get the latest version directly from your WordPress dashboard or by downloading it from WordPress.org.

Want to contribute to WordPress core? Check out the Core Contributor Handbook. Don’t forget to join the WordPress #core channel in the Make WordPress Slack and follow the Core Team blog. The Core Team hosts weekly chats on Wednesdays at 5 AM and 8 PM UTC. 

Gutenberg versions 10.6 and 10.7 are out

Gutenberg version 10.6 and version 10.7 were launched this month. Version 10.6 features experimental Duotone filters (which are shipping with WordPress 5.8), block pattern suggestions in placeholders, and enhancements to the table block. Version 10.7 adds a responsive navigation block, block design tools, and the ability to load block patterns from the directory.

Want to get involved in building Gutenberg? Follow the Core Team blog, contribute to Gutenberg on GitHub, and join the #core-editor channel in the Make WordPress Slack. The latest “What’s next in Gutenberg” post offers more details on the latest updates. If you are unfamiliar with the Gutenberg plugin, learn more in this post.

Full Site Editing updates

Don’t miss the latest Full Site Editing (FSE) Outreach program testing call on building portfolio pages using the Template Editing feature shipping with WordPress 5.8! The deadline is June 9. The team has published a recap of the Query Quest FSE Testing call, which shares some interesting results. The answers to round two of FSE questions are also out.

Countdown starts for WordCamp Europe 2021

The countdown to one of the most anticipated WordPress events, WordCamp Europe 2021 (Online), has started! The full schedule of the event is now available, and the team has exciting plans! Don’t miss this event: get your tickets now before they run out!

Further reading

Have a story that we should include in the next “Month in WordPress” post? Please submit it using this form

The following folks contributed to May’s Month in WordPress: @meher and @chaion07

WordPress.org blog: The Month in WordPress: May 2021

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 06/02/2021 - 18:23

It’s really fun to contribute to something larger than yourself.

Matt Mullenweg’s words in “The Commons of Images” episode of the WP Briefing podcast exemplify the core philosophy of the WordPress project,  especially as we inch closer to the next major release (version 5.8). This post covers exciting updates from the month of May.

WordPress turns 18

WordPress celebrated the 18th anniversary of its launch on May 27, 2021. To celebrate 40+ releases and WordPress’ support of 40% of the web, the team released 40 milestones to celebrate the anniversary of the software. Here’s to the next 18 and beyond! 

CC Search joins WordPress and is renamed to Openverse

Creative Commons Search has officially joined the WordPress project. Creative Commons Search (CC Search) is a CC0 image search engine with over 500 million openly licensed images. The search product, which is being renamed to Openverse, will eventually live on the URL: https://wordpress.org/openverse. Contributors working on CC Search will continue their work as part of a new dedicated Make team: https://make.wordpress.org/openverse. Check out “The Commons of Images” podcast episode for more information.

WordPress 5.7.2 released

WordPress version 5.7.2, a short-cycle security release, came out on May 13. Get the latest version directly from your WordPress dashboard or by downloading it from WordPress.org.

Want to contribute to WordPress core? Check out the Core Contributor Handbook. Don’t forget to join the WordPress #core channel in the Make WordPress Slack and follow the Core Team blog. The Core Team hosts weekly chats on Wednesdays at 5 AM and 8 PM UTC. 

Gutenberg versions 10.6 and 10.7 are out

Gutenberg version 10.6 and version 10.7 were launched this month. Version 10.6 features experimental Duotone filters (which are shipping with WordPress 5.8), block pattern suggestions in placeholders, and enhancements to the table block. Version 10.7 adds a responsive navigation block, block design tools, and the ability to load block patterns from the directory.

Want to get involved in building Gutenberg? Follow the Core Team blog, contribute to Gutenberg on GitHub, and join the #core-editor channel in the Make WordPress Slack. The latest “What’s next in Gutenberg” post offers more details on the latest updates. If you are unfamiliar with the Gutenberg plugin, learn more in this post.

Full Site Editing updates

Don’t miss the latest Full Site Editing (FSE) Outreach program testing call on building portfolio pages using the Template Editing feature shipping with WordPress 5.8! The deadline is June 9. The team has published a recap of the Query Quest FSE Testing call, which shares some interesting results. The answers to round two of FSE questions are also out.

Countdown starts for WordCamp Europe 2021

The countdown to one of the most anticipated WordPress events, WordCamp Europe 2021 (Online), has started! The full schedule of the event is now available, and the team has exciting plans! Don’t miss this event: get your tickets now before they run out!

Further reading

Have a story that we should include in the next “Month in WordPress” post? Please submit it using this form

The following folks contributed to May’s Month in WordPress: @meher and @chaion07

WordPress.org blog: The Month in WordPress: May 2021

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 06/02/2021 - 18:23

It’s really fun to contribute to something larger than yourself.

Matt Mullenweg’s words in “The Commons of Images” episode of the WP Briefing podcast exemplify the core philosophy of the WordPress project,  especially as we inch closer to the next major release (version 5.8). This post covers exciting updates from the month of May.

WordPress turns 18

WordPress celebrated the 18th anniversary of its launch on May 27, 2021. To celebrate 40+ releases and WordPress’ support of 40% of the web, the team released 40 milestones to celebrate the anniversary of the software. Here’s to the next 18 and beyond! 

CC Search joins WordPress and is renamed to Openverse

Creative Commons Search has officially joined the WordPress project. Creative Commons Search (CC Search) is a CC0 image search engine with over 500 million openly licensed images. The search product, which is being renamed to Openverse, will eventually live on the URL: https://wordpress.org/openverse. Contributors working on CC Search will continue their work as part of a new dedicated Make team: https://make.wordpress.org/openverse. Check out “The Commons of Images” podcast episode for more information.

WordPress 5.7.2 released

WordPress version 5.7.2, a short-cycle security release, came out on May 13. Get the latest version directly from your WordPress dashboard or by downloading it from WordPress.org.

Want to contribute to WordPress core? Check out the Core Contributor Handbook. Don’t forget to join the WordPress #core channel in the Make WordPress Slack and follow the Core Team blog. The Core Team hosts weekly chats on Wednesdays at 5 AM and 8 PM UTC. 

Gutenberg versions 10.6 and 10.7 are out

Gutenberg version 10.6 and version 10.7 were launched this month. Version 10.6 features experimental Duotone filters (which are shipping with WordPress 5.8), block pattern suggestions in placeholders, and enhancements to the table block. Version 10.7 adds a responsive navigation block, block design tools, and the ability to load block patterns from the directory.

Want to get involved in building Gutenberg? Follow the Core Team blog, contribute to Gutenberg on GitHub, and join the #core-editor channel in the Make WordPress Slack. The latest “What’s next in Gutenberg” post offers more details on the latest updates. If you are unfamiliar with the Gutenberg plugin, learn more in this post.

Full Site Editing updates

Don’t miss the latest Full Site Editing (FSE) Outreach program testing call on building portfolio pages using the Template Editing feature shipping with WordPress 5.8! The deadline is June 9. The team has published a recap of the Query Quest FSE Testing call, which shares some interesting results. The answers to round two of FSE questions are also out.

Countdown starts for WordCamp Europe 2021

The countdown to one of the most anticipated WordPress events, WordCamp Europe 2021 (Online), has started! The full schedule of the event is now available, and the team has exciting plans! Don’t miss this event: get your tickets now before they run out!

Further reading

Have a story that we should include in the next “Month in WordPress” post? Please submit it using this form

The following folks contributed to May’s Month in WordPress: @meher and @chaion07

The Month in WordPress: May 2021

Wordpress News - Wed, 06/02/2021 - 18:23

It’s really fun to contribute to something larger than yourself.

Matt Mullenweg’s words in “The Commons of Images” episode of the WP Briefing podcast exemplify the core philosophy of the WordPress project,  especially as we inch closer to the next major release (version 5.8). This post covers exciting updates from the month of May.

WordPress turns 18

WordPress celebrated the 18th anniversary of its launch on May 27, 2021. To celebrate 40+ releases and WordPress’ support of 40% of the web, the team released 40 milestones to celebrate the anniversary of the software. Here’s to the next 18 and beyond! 

CC Search joins WordPress and is renamed to Openverse

Creative Commons Search has officially joined the WordPress project. Creative Commons Search (CC Search) is a CC0 image search engine with over 500 million openly licensed images. The search product, which is being renamed to Openverse, will eventually live on the URL: https://wordpress.org/openverse. Contributors working on CC Search will continue their work as part of a new dedicated Make team: https://make.wordpress.org/openverse. Check out “The Commons of Images” podcast episode for more information.

WordPress 5.7.2 released

WordPress version 5.7.2, a short-cycle security release, came out on May 13. Get the latest version directly from your WordPress dashboard or by downloading it from WordPress.org.

Want to contribute to WordPress core? Check out the Core Contributor Handbook. Don’t forget to join the WordPress #core channel in the Make WordPress Slack and follow the Core Team blog. The Core Team hosts weekly chats on Wednesdays at 5 AM and 8 PM UTC. 

Gutenberg versions 10.6 and 10.7 are out

Gutenberg version 10.6 and version 10.7 were launched this month. Version 10.6 features experimental Duotone filters (which are shipping with WordPress 5.8), block pattern suggestions in placeholders, and enhancements to the table block. Version 10.7 adds a responsive navigation block, block design tools, and the ability to load block patterns from the directory.

Want to get involved in building Gutenberg? Follow the Core Team blog, contribute to Gutenberg on GitHub, and join the #core-editor channel in the Make WordPress Slack. The “What’s next in Gutenberg” post offers more details on the latest updates. If you are unfamiliar with the Gutenberg plugin, learn more in this post.

Full Site Editing updates

Don’t miss the latest Full Site Editing (FSE) Outreach program testing call on building portfolio pages using the Template Editing feature shipping with WordPress 5.8! The deadline is June 9. The team has published a recap of the Query Quest FSE Testing call, which shares some interesting results. The answers to round two of FSE questions are also out.

Countdown starts for WordCamp Europe 2021

The countdown to one of the most anticipated WordPress events, WordCamp Europe 2021 (Online), has started! The full schedule of the event is now available, and the team has exciting plans! Don’t miss this event: get your tickets now before they run out!

Further reading

Have a story that we should include in the next “Month in WordPress” post? Please submit it using this form

The following folks contributed to May’s Month in WordPress: @meher and @chaion07

HeroPress: From Blogging to WordPress Communities: A Bolivian tale – De Blogger a comunidades de WordPress: Una historia boliviana

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 06/02/2021 - 12:00

Este ensayo también está disponible en español.

I would have never imagined that working with WordPress would be a vital part of my current life and that I would be organizing the first WordCamp of my city Cochabamba, and the first of Bolivia.

To start with my story, let me clarify that I don’t have any background in computer science or similar. I actually studied Industrial Engineering and even did a masters degree in Environmental studies. But life has taken me somewhere else and I’m very happy with my current destination. I won’t go into details of how my career changed so much, that would take hours of reading. But my early stages of WordPress started when I decided to start a small business designing and selling cushions and bed clothes. It was tiny and it only lasted a bit more than a year. It was a solo person business, little investment, and very little planning. While I sat in the small store I’d rented to sell these items, begging that people stopping at the shop’s windows would step in to buy something, I decided I needed to create a website for this business.

Finding WordPress

I had zero budget to hire somebody but I had good confidence in my ability to learn things on my own. I had always been the nerdy type and a close friend with computers in general. Thus, I decided I would figure out how to build a website on my own. I ended up building the most simple website/blog with WordPress.com. I didn’t even have a budget to buy a custom domain and I stayed with the free subdomain from WordPress.com. Unfortunately, soon my entrepreneurship was over. There were no profits and any income went mostly to pay the store’s rent. To add to the decision, a previous company with whom I had worked before, contacted me for a job opening that matched my profile. I needed that income. Therefore, I closed the store and forgot about my entrepreneurship.

However, that brief encounter with a simple website had opened a field out there that I wanted to explore better some day.

Back to the employee mode, I started my new job as a technical writer for a software development company. Since I had done my masters degree in the UK, I had a decent level of English, and somehow my close affinity with computers and technology made it easy for me to translate complex software jargon into simple tutorial steps. As I got more training in technical writing, I started to improve my writing skills in general. That reconnected me with a long lost passion of mine- writing. I’d forgotten that little girl in me that used to love writing stories and journaling. In all these years of my adult life, I hadn’t reconnected to it. That’s when I realized I had to have a blog. I needed a blog. And when WordPress.com came to my encounter again.

Diving Deep

This time I wanted to know the platform deeply. Creating my blog helped me become more familiar with WordPress and website building in general. I blogged about writing, my thoughts, book reviews, and everything that could come to my mind. That was in 2015.

I don’t remember exactly how I got into the WordPress support forums, probably looking for answers to a specific issue about my blog. That’s when I realized there were other people’s questions that I could actually answer. I began checking the forums a couple of times per week. I did it as a hobby. I liked that I was able to help people and learn more while doing that.

Some people at my work checked their Facebook to relax on their break time, I checked the WordPress.com forums.

That’s how I found out about the Happiness Engineer position in Automattic. A Happiness Engineer provides customer support to people building their blogs or websites with WordPress.com. When I read the job description, it was like reading a job that was perfect for me. Even more it offered the possibility to work remotely and even travel while still working. My career as a technical writer was stuck after three years and I was also certain that I didn’t want to go back to any job related to Industrial Engineering.

My story about applying to Automattic is long. To summarize it, I didn’t get in it the first time I applied. I had to do the trial twice and re-applied three times in total. I had to learn about HTML and CSS. But after almost one year and a half in between the applications and the two trials, I finally got the job. WordPress became my main means of income.

Building A Community

It was in this job that I learned about the WordPress communities around the world and WordCamps. And when somebody asked, how is the WordPress community where you live? I was speechless. I really didn’t know. Was there a community?

Soon after finding there wasn’t any community, I started to dig more information about what was needed to organize one. I talked about the idea with some colleagues and they provided good insights. But I was still debating inside myself, who would start it? Was it me? It couldn’t be. It was true I provided technical support for blogs and websites, but I knew nothing about coding, plugin or theme development.

It had to be somebody else, an expert WordPress developer,  not me.

But after trying to gauge interest and ask around I realized that the only way to find these community members was to start the community. Therefore, the WordPress community in Cochabamba was born. That was 3 years ago.

We’ve had ups and downs, probably similar to any other community. And although Cochabamba is not a big city, we had issues finding a location that would be accessible to everybody and wouldn’t incur a cost. We had people coming from all different levels of knowledge, from people that had a vast experience with WordPress to people with no experience at all but that wanted to learn. Covid19 actually helped the community grow when meetups went online.

Giving Back Through Speaking

The community also brought in me a side I didn’t know I would ever be interested in: public speaking. I had the opportunity to be a speaker at WordCamp Mexico, WordCamp Guayaquil and WordCamp Colombia online. I started to gain confidence while I enjoyed the opportunity to connect with other communities and meet people that were in similar pathways. Not all of them were developers as one tends to imagine in a WordPress community, many like me started only as bloggers.

Finally, after 3 years we decided to organize our first WordCamp. I never imagined myself organizing any WordCamp- me, the shy one, suddenly talking to sponsors, contacting companies to sponsor us, leading a group of people with different talents and backgrounds. I’m thrilled to say that I’ve learned so much from the experience.

In all these years my career has taken a dramatic swift turn.

Thanks to WordPress I have been able to find a good job, work remotely, and help build something in my community that helps people learn skills and find career opportunities.

I couldn’t be more grateful for all the good things that WordPress has given me.

De Blogger a comunidades de WordPress: Una historia boliviana

Nunca me hubiera imaginado que trabajar con WordPress sería una parte vital de mi vida y que estaría organizando el primer WordCamp de mi ciudad, Cochabamba, y el primero de Bolivia.

Para comenzar con mi  historia, déjenme aclarar que no tengo ningún estudio en ciencias de la computación o similar. Estudié Ingeniería Industrial e incluso hice una maestría en estudios ambientales. Pero mi vida ha tomado otro rumbo y estoy feliz con donde estoy ahora.

No iré en detalles de cómo mi carrera cambió, eso tomaría horas de lectura. Pero mis comienzos tempranos con WordPress empezaron cuando decidí comenzar un pequeño negocio diseñando y vendiendo almohadones y ropa de cama. Era muy pequeño y solo duró un poco más de un año. Era un negocio de una sola persona, con poca inversión y poca planeación. Mientras me sentaba dentro de mi tienda vendiendo mis productos y rogando que la gente que se detenía en frente de las vitrinas entrara a comprar algo, decidí que necesitaba crear un sitio web para mi negocio.

Mi encuentro con WordPress

Tenía cero presupuesto para contratar a alguién pero tenía confianza en mis habilidades para aprender cosas por mi misma. Siempre había sido del tipo nerd y muy amiga de las computadoras en general. Entonces decidí que encontraría la forma de construir el sitio web por mi misma. Terminé construyendo un sitio, casi blog, de lo más simple. No tenía ni siquiera presupuesto para comprar un dominio personalizado y me quedé con el subdominio gratuito de WordPress.com. Desafortunadamente, mi emprendimiento llegó al fin. No habían ganancias y cualquier ingreso era generalmente para pagar el alquiler de la tienda. Para influenciar aún más esta decisión, una compañía con quien había trabajado anteriormente me contactó para un trabajo que le iba muy bien a mi perfil. Necesitaba esos ingresos. Por lo tanto cerré la tienda y me olvidé de mi emprendimiento.

Sin embargo, ese encuentro breve con un sitio web simplísimo abrió un campo delante de mis ojos que quería explorar mejor algún día.

De nuevo ya en modo de empleado, comencé mi trabajo como technical writer para una empresa de software. Como había hecho mi maestría en el Reino Unido, tenía un nivel decente de inglés y mi afinidad con las computadoras y la tecnología en general hacía que fuese sencillo para mi traducir la jerga compleja de los desarrolladores de software en tutoriales con sencillos pasos. A medida que recibía más entrenamiento en technical writing, comencé a mejorar mis habilidades de escritura. Eso me reconectó con una pasión perdida, la escritura. Me había olvidado de esa pequeña niña a la que le encantaba escribir historias. En todos estos años de mi vida adulta, no me había reconectado con eso. Entonces me di cuenta que necesitaba un blog, tenía que tener un blog. Y WordPress.com vino a mi encuentro otra vez.

Sumergiéndome profundamente

Esta vez quería conocer la plataforma más profundamente. La creación de mi blog me ayudó a estar más familiarizada con WordPress y con la construcción de sitios web en general. Blogueé sobre el proceso de escritura, mis pensamientos, revisiones de libros, cualquier cosa que se venga a mi mente. Eso fué en 2015.

No recuerdo exactamente cómo llegué a los foros de WordPress, tal vez buscando respuestas a algún problema con mi blog. Ahí fue cuando me di cuenta que habían preguntas de otras personas que en realidad podía responder. Empecé a revisar los foros un par de veces por semana. Lo hacía por hobby. Me gustaba que podía ayudar a la gente y aprender más mientras lo hacía.

Alguna gente en mi trabajo revisaba su Facebook durante el tiempo de descanso, yo revisaba los foros de WordPress.com

Fué así que me enteré del trabajo de Happiness Engineer en Automattic. Un Ingeniero de la Felicidad provee soporte técnico a personas que construyen sus sitios o blogs con WordPress.com. Cuando leí la descripción del trabajo, era como leer algo que era perfecto para mí. Adicionalmente me daba la posibilidad de trabajar remotamente e incluso trabajar mientras viajaba. Mi carrera como technical writer estaba estancada después de tres años y estaba segura que no quería retornar a algún trabajo relacionado con Ingeniería Industrial.

Mi historia sobre mi postulación a Automattic es muy larga. Para resumirlo, no entré a la primera vez. Tuve que hacer el periodo de prueba 2 veces y postulé como 3 veces en general. Tuve que aprender HTML y CSS. Pero después de casi un año y medio entre estas postulaciones y los periodos de prueba, finalmente obtuve el trabajo. WordPress se convirtió en la fuente principal de ingreso.

Construyendo una Comunidad

Fue en este trabajo que aprendí sobre las comunidades de WordPress en el mundo y los WordCamps. Y cuando alguien me preguntó cómo es la comunidad de WordPress de donde eres? No tenía respuesta. No sabía. ¿Había alguna comunidad?

Muy pronto después de darme cuenta que no había ninguna comunidad, empecé a buscar más información sobre lo que era necesario para organizar una. Hablé de la idea con algunos colegas y me dieron buenas perspectivas. Pero todavía me debatía dentro de mi, ¿quien empezaría esta comunidad? ¿Sería yo? No podía ser. Era cierto que proveía soporte técnico para los blogs y páginas web, pero no sabía nada de código o desarrollo de plugins o temas.

Tenía que ser alguien más, un experto desarrollador en WordPress, no yo.

Después de tratar de ver el interés alrededor mío, me di cuenta que la única manera de encontrar a estos miembros de la comunidad era empezando la comunidad. Y es así como la comunidad de Cochabamba nació. Eso fue hace 3 años.

Tuvimos subidas y bajadas, probablemente como cualquier comunidad. Aunque Cochabamba no es una ciudad grande, tuvimos problemas encontrando un lugar accesible a todos, que no incurría en grandes costos. Tuvimos gente viniendo de todo tipo de experiencias de WordPress, desde gente con vasta experiencia hasta gente que no tenía experiencia para nada pero que quería aprender. El Covid19 en realidad nos ayudó a que la comunidad crezca cuando las reuniones se volvieron virtuales.

Hablando para contribuir

La comunidad de WordPress también despertó en mí una parte en la que nunca pensé que estaría interesada, hablar en público. Tuve la oportunidad de ser ponente en el WordCamp México, WordCamp Guayaquil y el WordCamp Colombia online. Empecé a adquirir confianza y disfrutar de la oportunidad de conectar con otras comunidades y conocer gente que estaba en caminos similares. No todos ellos eran desarrolladores como uno tiende a imaginar en una comunidad de WordPress, muchos como yo comenzaron solo como bloggers.

Finalmente, después de 3 años, decidimos organizar el primer WordCamp. Nunca me imaginé organizando ningún WordCamp de ningún tipo, yo, bastante tímida, hablando con patrocinadores, contactando compañías para patrocinarnos, liderando un grupo de gente con diferentes talentos y backgrounds. Estoy muy feliz de decir que he aprendido mucho de esta experiencia.

En todos estos años, mi carrera ha dado un giro dramático.

Gracias a WordPress he podido encontrar un buen trabajo, trabajar remotamente, y ayudar a construir algo en mi comunidad que ayuda a que la gente aprenda nuevas habilidades y encuentre oportunidades laborales.

No podría estar más agradecida por todas las cosas buenas que WordPress me ha dado.

The post From Blogging to WordPress Communities: A Bolivian tale – De Blogger a comunidades de WordPress: Una historia boliviana appeared first on HeroPress.

HeroPress: From Blogging to WordPress Communities: A Bolivian tale – De Blogger a comunidades de WordPress: Una historia boliviana

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 06/02/2021 - 12:00

Este ensayo también está disponible en español.

I would have never imagined that working with WordPress would be a vital part of my current life and that I would be organizing the first WordCamp of my city Cochabamba, and the first of Bolivia.

To start with my story, let me clarify that I don’t have any background in computer science or similar. I actually studied Industrial Engineering and even did a masters degree in Environmental studies. But life has taken me somewhere else and I’m very happy with my current destination. I won’t go into details of how my career changed so much, that would take hours of reading. But my early stages of WordPress started when I decided to start a small business designing and selling cushions and bed clothes. It was tiny and it only lasted a bit more than a year. It was a solo person business, little investment, and very little planning. While I sat in the small store I’d rented to sell these items, begging that people stopping at the shop’s windows would step in to buy something, I decided I needed to create a website for this business.

Finding WordPress

I had zero budget to hire somebody but I had good confidence in my ability to learn things on my own. I had always been the nerdy type and a close friend with computers in general. Thus, I decided I would figure out how to build a website on my own. I ended up building the most simple website/blog with WordPress.com. I didn’t even have a budget to buy a custom domain and I stayed with the free subdomain from WordPress.com. Unfortunately, soon my entrepreneurship was over. There were no profits and any income went mostly to pay the store’s rent. To add to the decision, a previous company with whom I had worked before, contacted me for a job opening that matched my profile. I needed that income. Therefore, I closed the store and forgot about my entrepreneurship.

However, that brief encounter with a simple website had opened a field out there that I wanted to explore better some day.

Back to the employee mode, I started my new job as a technical writer for a software development company. Since I had done my masters degree in the UK, I had a decent level of English, and somehow my close affinity with computers and technology made it easy for me to translate complex software jargon into simple tutorial steps. As I got more training in technical writing, I started to improve my writing skills in general. That reconnected me with a long lost passion of mine- writing. I’d forgotten that little girl in me that used to love writing stories and journaling. In all these years of my adult life, I hadn’t reconnected to it. That’s when I realized I had to have a blog. I needed a blog. And when WordPress.com came to my encounter again.

Diving Deep

This time I wanted to know the platform deeply. Creating my blog helped me become more familiar with WordPress and website building in general. I blogged about writing, my thoughts, book reviews, and everything that could come to my mind. That was in 2015.

I don’t remember exactly how I got into the WordPress support forums, probably looking for answers to a specific issue about my blog. That’s when I realized there were other people’s questions that I could actually answer. I began checking the forums a couple of times per week. I did it as a hobby. I liked that I was able to help people and learn more while doing that.

Some people at my work checked their Facebook to relax on their break time, I checked the WordPress.com forums.

That’s how I found out about the Happiness Engineer position in Automattic. A Happiness Engineer provides customer support to people building their blogs or websites with WordPress.com. When I read the job description, it was like reading a job that was perfect for me. Even more it offered the possibility to work remotely and even travel while still working. My career as a technical writer was stuck after three years and I was also certain that I didn’t want to go back to any job related to Industrial Engineering.

My story about applying to Automattic is long. To summarize it, I didn’t get in it the first time I applied. I had to do the trial twice and re-applied three times in total. I had to learn about HTML and CSS. But after almost one year and a half in between the applications and the two trials, I finally got the job. WordPress became my main means of income.

Building A Community

It was in this job that I learned about the WordPress communities around the world and WordCamps. And when somebody asked, how is the WordPress community where you live? I was speechless. I really didn’t know. Was there a community?

Soon after finding there wasn’t any community, I started to dig more information about what was needed to organize one. I talked about the idea with some colleagues and they provided good insights. But I was still debating inside myself, who would start it? Was it me? It couldn’t be. It was true I provided technical support for blogs and websites, but I knew nothing about coding, plugin or theme development.

It had to be somebody else, an expert WordPress developer,  not me.

But after trying to gauge interest and ask around I realized that the only way to find these community members was to start the community. Therefore, the WordPress community in Cochabamba was born. That was 3 years ago.

We’ve had ups and downs, probably similar to any other community. And although Cochabamba is not a big city, we had issues finding a location that would be accessible to everybody and wouldn’t incur a cost. We had people coming from all different levels of knowledge, from people that had a vast experience with WordPress to people with no experience at all but that wanted to learn. Covid19 actually helped the community grow when meetups went online.

Giving Back Through Speaking

The community also brought in me a side I didn’t know I would ever be interested in: public speaking. I had the opportunity to be a speaker at WordCamp Mexico, WordCamp Guayaquil and WordCamp Colombia online. I started to gain confidence while I enjoyed the opportunity to connect with other communities and meet people that were in similar pathways. Not all of them were developers as one tends to imagine in a WordPress community, many like me started only as bloggers.

Finally, after 3 years we decided to organize our first WordCamp. I never imagined myself organizing any WordCamp- me, the shy one, suddenly talking to sponsors, contacting companies to sponsor us, leading a group of people with different talents and backgrounds. I’m thrilled to say that I’ve learned so much from the experience.

In all these years my career has taken a dramatic swift turn.

Thanks to WordPress I have been able to find a good job, work remotely, and help build something in my community that helps people learn skills and find career opportunities.

I couldn’t be more grateful for all the good things that WordPress has given me.

De Blogger a comunidades de WordPress: Una historia boliviana

Nunca me hubiera imaginado que trabajar con WordPress sería una parte vital de mi vida y que estaría organizando el primer WordCamp de mi ciudad, Cochabamba, y el primero de Bolivia.

Para comenzar con mi  historia, déjenme aclarar que no tengo ningún estudio en ciencias de la computación o similar. Estudié Ingeniería Industrial e incluso hice una maestría en estudios ambientales. Pero mi vida ha tomado otro rumbo y estoy feliz con donde estoy ahora.

No iré en detalles de cómo mi carrera cambió, eso tomaría horas de lectura. Pero mis comienzos tempranos con WordPress empezaron cuando decidí comenzar un pequeño negocio diseñando y vendiendo almohadones y ropa de cama. Era muy pequeño y solo duró un poco más de un año. Era un negocio de una sola persona, con poca inversión y poca planeación. Mientras me sentaba dentro de mi tienda vendiendo mis productos y rogando que la gente que se detenía en frente de las vitrinas entrara a comprar algo, decidí que necesitaba crear un sitio web para mi negocio.

Mi encuentro con WordPress

Tenía cero presupuesto para contratar a alguién pero tenía confianza en mis habilidades para aprender cosas por mi misma. Siempre había sido del tipo nerd y muy amiga de las computadoras en general. Entonces decidí que encontraría la forma de construir el sitio web por mi misma. Terminé construyendo un sitio, casi blog, de lo más simple. No tenía ni siquiera presupuesto para comprar un dominio personalizado y me quedé con el subdominio gratuito de WordPress.com. Desafortunadamente, mi emprendimiento llegó al fin. No habían ganancias y cualquier ingreso era generalmente para pagar el alquiler de la tienda. Para influenciar aún más esta decisión, una compañía con quien había trabajado anteriormente me contactó para un trabajo que le iba muy bien a mi perfil. Necesitaba esos ingresos. Por lo tanto cerré la tienda y me olvidé de mi emprendimiento.

Sin embargo, ese encuentro breve con un sitio web simplísimo abrió un campo delante de mis ojos que quería explorar mejor algún día.

De nuevo ya en modo de empleado, comencé mi trabajo como technical writer para una empresa de software. Como había hecho mi maestría en el Reino Unido, tenía un nivel decente de inglés y mi afinidad con las computadoras y la tecnología en general hacía que fuese sencillo para mi traducir la jerga compleja de los desarrolladores de software en tutoriales con sencillos pasos. A medida que recibía más entrenamiento en technical writing, comencé a mejorar mis habilidades de escritura. Eso me reconectó con una pasión perdida, la escritura. Me había olvidado de esa pequeña niña a la que le encantaba escribir historias. En todos estos años de mi vida adulta, no me había reconectado con eso. Entonces me di cuenta que necesitaba un blog, tenía que tener un blog. Y WordPress.com vino a mi encuentro otra vez.

Sumergiéndome profundamente

Esta vez quería conocer la plataforma más profundamente. La creación de mi blog me ayudó a estar más familiarizada con WordPress y con la construcción de sitios web en general. Blogueé sobre el proceso de escritura, mis pensamientos, revisiones de libros, cualquier cosa que se venga a mi mente. Eso fué en 2015.

No recuerdo exactamente cómo llegué a los foros de WordPress, tal vez buscando respuestas a algún problema con mi blog. Ahí fue cuando me di cuenta que habían preguntas de otras personas que en realidad podía responder. Empecé a revisar los foros un par de veces por semana. Lo hacía por hobby. Me gustaba que podía ayudar a la gente y aprender más mientras lo hacía.

Alguna gente en mi trabajo revisaba su Facebook durante el tiempo de descanso, yo revisaba los foros de WordPress.com

Fué así que me enteré del trabajo de Happiness Engineer en Automattic. Un Ingeniero de la Felicidad provee soporte técnico a personas que construyen sus sitios o blogs con WordPress.com. Cuando leí la descripción del trabajo, era como leer algo que era perfecto para mí. Adicionalmente me daba la posibilidad de trabajar remotamente e incluso trabajar mientras viajaba. Mi carrera como technical writer estaba estancada después de tres años y estaba segura que no quería retornar a algún trabajo relacionado con Ingeniería Industrial.

Mi historia sobre mi postulación a Automattic es muy larga. Para resumirlo, no entré a la primera vez. Tuve que hacer el periodo de prueba 2 veces y postulé como 3 veces en general. Tuve que aprender HTML y CSS. Pero después de casi un año y medio entre estas postulaciones y los periodos de prueba, finalmente obtuve el trabajo. WordPress se convirtió en la fuente principal de ingreso.

Construyendo una Comunidad

Fue en este trabajo que aprendí sobre las comunidades de WordPress en el mundo y los WordCamps. Y cuando alguien me preguntó cómo es la comunidad de WordPress de donde eres? No tenía respuesta. No sabía. ¿Había alguna comunidad?

Muy pronto después de darme cuenta que no había ninguna comunidad, empecé a buscar más información sobre lo que era necesario para organizar una. Hablé de la idea con algunos colegas y me dieron buenas perspectivas. Pero todavía me debatía dentro de mi, ¿quien empezaría esta comunidad? ¿Sería yo? No podía ser. Era cierto que proveía soporte técnico para los blogs y páginas web, pero no sabía nada de código o desarrollo de plugins o temas.

Tenía que ser alguien más, un experto desarrollador en WordPress, no yo.

Después de tratar de ver el interés alrededor mío, me di cuenta que la única manera de encontrar a estos miembros de la comunidad era empezando la comunidad. Y es así como la comunidad de Cochabamba nació. Eso fue hace 3 años.

Tuvimos subidas y bajadas, probablemente como cualquier comunidad. Aunque Cochabamba no es una ciudad grande, tuvimos problemas encontrando un lugar accesible a todos, que no incurría en grandes costos. Tuvimos gente viniendo de todo tipo de experiencias de WordPress, desde gente con vasta experiencia hasta gente que no tenía experiencia para nada pero que quería aprender. El Covid19 en realidad nos ayudó a que la comunidad crezca cuando las reuniones se volvieron virtuales.

Hablando para contribuir

La comunidad de WordPress también despertó en mí una parte en la que nunca pensé que estaría interesada, hablar en público. Tuve la oportunidad de ser ponente en el WordCamp México, WordCamp Guayaquil y el WordCamp Colombia online. Empecé a adquirir confianza y disfrutar de la oportunidad de conectar con otras comunidades y conocer gente que estaba en caminos similares. No todos ellos eran desarrolladores como uno tiende a imaginar en una comunidad de WordPress, muchos como yo comenzaron solo como bloggers.

Finalmente, después de 3 años, decidimos organizar el primer WordCamp. Nunca me imaginé organizando ningún WordCamp de ningún tipo, yo, bastante tímida, hablando con patrocinadores, contactando compañías para patrocinarnos, liderando un grupo de gente con diferentes talentos y backgrounds. Estoy muy feliz de decir que he aprendido mucho de esta experiencia.

En todos estos años, mi carrera ha dado un giro dramático.

Gracias a WordPress he podido encontrar un buen trabajo, trabajar remotamente, y ayudar a construir algo en mi comunidad que ayuda a que la gente aprenda nuevas habilidades y encuentre oportunidades laborales.

No podría estar más agradecida por todas las cosas buenas que WordPress me ha dado.

The post From Blogging to WordPress Communities: A Bolivian tale – De Blogger a comunidades de WordPress: Una historia boliviana appeared first on HeroPress.

HeroPress: From Blogging to WordPress Communities: A Bolivian tale – De Blogger a comunidades de WordPress: Una historia boliviana

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 06/02/2021 - 12:00

Este ensayo también está disponible en español.

I would have never imagined that working with WordPress would be a vital part of my current life and that I would be organizing the first WordCamp of my city Cochabamba, and the first of Bolivia.

To start with my story, let me clarify that I don’t have any background in computer science or similar. I actually studied Industrial Engineering and even did a masters degree in Environmental studies. But life has taken me somewhere else and I’m very happy with my current destination. I won’t go into details of how my career changed so much, that would take hours of reading. But my early stages of WordPress started when I decided to start a small business designing and selling cushions and bed clothes. It was tiny and it only lasted a bit more than a year. It was a solo person business, little investment, and very little planning. While I sat in the small store I’d rented to sell these items, begging that people stopping at the shop’s windows would step in to buy something, I decided I needed to create a website for this business.

Finding WordPress

I had zero budget to hire somebody but I had good confidence in my ability to learn things on my own. I had always been the nerdy type and a close friend with computers in general. Thus, I decided I would figure out how to build a website on my own. I ended up building the most simple website/blog with WordPress.com. I didn’t even have a budget to buy a custom domain and I stayed with the free subdomain from WordPress.com. Unfortunately, soon my entrepreneurship was over. There were no profits and any income went mostly to pay the store’s rent. To add to the decision, a previous company with whom I had worked before, contacted me for a job opening that matched my profile. I needed that income. Therefore, I closed the store and forgot about my entrepreneurship.

However, that brief encounter with a simple website had opened a field out there that I wanted to explore better some day.

Back to the employee mode, I started my new job as a technical writer for a software development company. Since I had done my masters degree in the UK, I had a decent level of English, and somehow my close affinity with computers and technology made it easy for me to translate complex software jargon into simple tutorial steps. As I got more training in technical writing, I started to improve my writing skills in general. That reconnected me with a long lost passion of mine- writing. I’d forgotten that little girl in me that used to love writing stories and journaling. In all these years of my adult life, I hadn’t reconnected to it. That’s when I realized I had to have a blog. I needed a blog. And when WordPress.com came to my encounter again.

Diving Deep

This time I wanted to know the platform deeply. Creating my blog helped me become more familiar with WordPress and website building in general. I blogged about writing, my thoughts, book reviews, and everything that could come to my mind. That was in 2015.

I don’t remember exactly how I got into the WordPress support forums, probably looking for answers to a specific issue about my blog. That’s when I realized there were other people’s questions that I could actually answer. I began checking the forums a couple of times per week. I did it as a hobby. I liked that I was able to help people and learn more while doing that.

Some people at my work checked their Facebook to relax on their break time, I checked the WordPress.com forums.

That’s how I found out about the Happiness Engineer position in Automattic. A Happiness Engineer provides customer support to people building their blogs or websites with WordPress.com. When I read the job description, it was like reading a job that was perfect for me. Even more it offered the possibility to work remotely and even travel while still working. My career as a technical writer was stuck after three years and I was also certain that I didn’t want to go back to any job related to Industrial Engineering.

My story about applying to Automattic is long. To summarize it, I didn’t get in it the first time I applied. I had to do the trial twice and re-applied three times in total. I had to learn about HTML and CSS. But after almost one year and a half in between the applications and the two trials, I finally got the job. WordPress became my main means of income.

Building A Community

It was in this job that I learned about the WordPress communities around the world and WordCamps. And when somebody asked, how is the WordPress community where you live? I was speechless. I really didn’t know. Was there a community?

Soon after finding there wasn’t any community, I started to dig more information about what was needed to organize one. I talked about the idea with some colleagues and they provided good insights. But I was still debating inside myself, who would start it? Was it me? It couldn’t be. It was true I provided technical support for blogs and websites, but I knew nothing about coding, plugin or theme development.

It had to be somebody else, an expert WordPress developer,  not me.

But after trying to gauge interest and ask around I realized that the only way to find these community members was to start the community. Therefore, the WordPress community in Cochabamba was born. That was 3 years ago.

We’ve had ups and downs, probably similar to any other community. And although Cochabamba is not a big city, we had issues finding a location that would be accessible to everybody and wouldn’t incur a cost. We had people coming from all different levels of knowledge, from people that had a vast experience with WordPress to people with no experience at all but that wanted to learn. Covid19 actually helped the community grow when meetups went online.

Giving Back Through Speaking

The community also brought in me a side I didn’t know I would ever be interested in: public speaking. I had the opportunity to be a speaker at WordCamp Mexico, WordCamp Guayaquil and WordCamp Colombia online. I started to gain confidence while I enjoyed the opportunity to connect with other communities and meet people that were in similar pathways. Not all of them were developers as one tends to imagine in a WordPress community, many like me started only as bloggers.

Finally, after 3 years we decided to organize our first WordCamp. I never imagined myself organizing any WordCamp- me, the shy one, suddenly talking to sponsors, contacting companies to sponsor us, leading a group of people with different talents and backgrounds. I’m thrilled to say that I’ve learned so much from the experience.

In all these years my career has taken a dramatic swift turn.

Thanks to WordPress I have been able to find a good job, work remotely, and help build something in my community that helps people learn skills and find career opportunities.

I couldn’t be more grateful for all the good things that WordPress has given me.

De Blogger a comunidades de WordPress: Una historia boliviana

Nunca me hubiera imaginado que trabajar con WordPress sería una parte vital de mi vida y que estaría organizando el primer WordCamp de mi ciudad, Cochabamba, y el primero de Bolivia.

Para comenzar con mi  historia, déjenme aclarar que no tengo ningún estudio en ciencias de la computación o similar. Estudié Ingeniería Industrial e incluso hice una maestría en estudios ambientales. Pero mi vida ha tomado otro rumbo y estoy feliz con donde estoy ahora.

No iré en detalles de cómo mi carrera cambió, eso tomaría horas de lectura. Pero mis comienzos tempranos con WordPress empezaron cuando decidí comenzar un pequeño negocio diseñando y vendiendo almohadones y ropa de cama. Era muy pequeño y solo duró un poco más de un año. Era un negocio de una sola persona, con poca inversión y poca planeación. Mientras me sentaba dentro de mi tienda vendiendo mis productos y rogando que la gente que se detenía en frente de las vitrinas entrara a comprar algo, decidí que necesitaba crear un sitio web para mi negocio.

Mi encuentro con WordPress

Tenía cero presupuesto para contratar a alguién pero tenía confianza en mis habilidades para aprender cosas por mi misma. Siempre había sido del tipo nerd y muy amiga de las computadoras en general. Entonces decidí que encontraría la forma de construir el sitio web por mi misma. Terminé construyendo un sitio, casi blog, de lo más simple. No tenía ni siquiera presupuesto para comprar un dominio personalizado y me quedé con el subdominio gratuito de WordPress.com. Desafortunadamente, mi emprendimiento llegó al fin. No habían ganancias y cualquier ingreso era generalmente para pagar el alquiler de la tienda. Para influenciar aún más esta decisión, una compañía con quien había trabajado anteriormente me contactó para un trabajo que le iba muy bien a mi perfil. Necesitaba esos ingresos. Por lo tanto cerré la tienda y me olvidé de mi emprendimiento.

Sin embargo, ese encuentro breve con un sitio web simplísimo abrió un campo delante de mis ojos que quería explorar mejor algún día.

De nuevo ya en modo de empleado, comencé mi trabajo como technical writer para una empresa de software. Como había hecho mi maestría en el Reino Unido, tenía un nivel decente de inglés y mi afinidad con las computadoras y la tecnología en general hacía que fuese sencillo para mi traducir la jerga compleja de los desarrolladores de software en tutoriales con sencillos pasos. A medida que recibía más entrenamiento en technical writing, comencé a mejorar mis habilidades de escritura. Eso me reconectó con una pasión perdida, la escritura. Me había olvidado de esa pequeña niña a la que le encantaba escribir historias. En todos estos años de mi vida adulta, no me había reconectado con eso. Entonces me di cuenta que necesitaba un blog, tenía que tener un blog. Y WordPress.com vino a mi encuentro otra vez.

Sumergiéndome profundamente

Esta vez quería conocer la plataforma más profundamente. La creación de mi blog me ayudó a estar más familiarizada con WordPress y con la construcción de sitios web en general. Blogueé sobre el proceso de escritura, mis pensamientos, revisiones de libros, cualquier cosa que se venga a mi mente. Eso fué en 2015.

No recuerdo exactamente cómo llegué a los foros de WordPress, tal vez buscando respuestas a algún problema con mi blog. Ahí fue cuando me di cuenta que habían preguntas de otras personas que en realidad podía responder. Empecé a revisar los foros un par de veces por semana. Lo hacía por hobby. Me gustaba que podía ayudar a la gente y aprender más mientras lo hacía.

Alguna gente en mi trabajo revisaba su Facebook durante el tiempo de descanso, yo revisaba los foros de WordPress.com

Fué así que me enteré del trabajo de Happiness Engineer en Automattic. Un Ingeniero de la Felicidad provee soporte técnico a personas que construyen sus sitios o blogs con WordPress.com. Cuando leí la descripción del trabajo, era como leer algo que era perfecto para mí. Adicionalmente me daba la posibilidad de trabajar remotamente e incluso trabajar mientras viajaba. Mi carrera como technical writer estaba estancada después de tres años y estaba segura que no quería retornar a algún trabajo relacionado con Ingeniería Industrial.

Mi historia sobre mi postulación a Automattic es muy larga. Para resumirlo, no entré a la primera vez. Tuve que hacer el periodo de prueba 2 veces y postulé como 3 veces en general. Tuve que aprender HTML y CSS. Pero después de casi un año y medio entre estas postulaciones y los periodos de prueba, finalmente obtuve el trabajo. WordPress se convirtió en la fuente principal de ingreso.

Construyendo una Comunidad

Fue en este trabajo que aprendí sobre las comunidades de WordPress en el mundo y los WordCamps. Y cuando alguien me preguntó cómo es la comunidad de WordPress de donde eres? No tenía respuesta. No sabía. ¿Había alguna comunidad?

Muy pronto después de darme cuenta que no había ninguna comunidad, empecé a buscar más información sobre lo que era necesario para organizar una. Hablé de la idea con algunos colegas y me dieron buenas perspectivas. Pero todavía me debatía dentro de mi, ¿quien empezaría esta comunidad? ¿Sería yo? No podía ser. Era cierto que proveía soporte técnico para los blogs y páginas web, pero no sabía nada de código o desarrollo de plugins o temas.

Tenía que ser alguien más, un experto desarrollador en WordPress, no yo.

Después de tratar de ver el interés alrededor mío, me di cuenta que la única manera de encontrar a estos miembros de la comunidad era empezando la comunidad. Y es así como la comunidad de Cochabamba nació. Eso fue hace 3 años.

Tuvimos subidas y bajadas, probablemente como cualquier comunidad. Aunque Cochabamba no es una ciudad grande, tuvimos problemas encontrando un lugar accesible a todos, que no incurría en grandes costos. Tuvimos gente viniendo de todo tipo de experiencias de WordPress, desde gente con vasta experiencia hasta gente que no tenía experiencia para nada pero que quería aprender. El Covid19 en realidad nos ayudó a que la comunidad crezca cuando las reuniones se volvieron virtuales.

Hablando para contribuir

La comunidad de WordPress también despertó en mí una parte en la que nunca pensé que estaría interesada, hablar en público. Tuve la oportunidad de ser ponente en el WordCamp México, WordCamp Guayaquil y el WordCamp Colombia online. Empecé a adquirir confianza y disfrutar de la oportunidad de conectar con otras comunidades y conocer gente que estaba en caminos similares. No todos ellos eran desarrolladores como uno tiende a imaginar en una comunidad de WordPress, muchos como yo comenzaron solo como bloggers.

Finalmente, después de 3 años, decidimos organizar el primer WordCamp. Nunca me imaginé organizando ningún WordCamp de ningún tipo, yo, bastante tímida, hablando con patrocinadores, contactando compañías para patrocinarnos, liderando un grupo de gente con diferentes talentos y backgrounds. Estoy muy feliz de decir que he aprendido mucho de esta experiencia.

En todos estos años, mi carrera ha dado un giro dramático.

Gracias a WordPress he podido encontrar un buen trabajo, trabajar remotamente, y ayudar a construir algo en mi comunidad que ayuda a que la gente aprenda nuevas habilidades y encuentre oportunidades laborales.

No podría estar más agradecida por todas las cosas buenas que WordPress me ha dado.

The post From Blogging to WordPress Communities: A Bolivian tale – De Blogger a comunidades de WordPress: Una historia boliviana appeared first on HeroPress.

WPTavern: Chrome Canary Adds Flag for Disabling FLoC Testing

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 06/02/2021 - 03:12

Google’s controversial Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoC) experiment now has a feature flag within Chrome Canary (the nightly build of Chrome for developers) that allows users to opt out.

In January 2020, Google announced its plans to discontinue support for third-party cookies in Chrome within two years. The first bits and pieces of the company’s Privacy Sandbox initiative started landing in Chrome in December 2020 with an initial flag to disable it. FLoC, Google’s proposed replacement for third-party cookies, began testing as a developer origin trial in Chrome at the end of March 2021.

In Canary, users can navigate to chrome://flags/#privacy-sandbox-settings-2 to find the Privacy Sandbox Settings 2 flag.

Relaunch Canary to save the changes. This will unlock the box that allows users to either reset their FLoC group or opt out of FLoC entirely. The new setting is available under chrome://settings/privacySandbox:

If the setting remains enabled, which is the default, Chrome will group users into cohorts based on recent browsing activity and then advertisers select ads for the entire group. Browsing activity for the individual is “kept private on your device,” but Chrome certainly has access that information by way of mediating the cohorts. Google notes that the trial is currently only active in some regions.

Users can also opt out of Privacy Sandbox trials on the same page. Current trials include the following:

  • Advertisers and publishers can use FLoC
  • Advertisers and publishers can study the effectiveness of ads in a way that does not track you across sites

Google has not specified how users would opt out of FLoC if the experiment is successful and moves forward. Organizations and site owners who are currently on the fence about it may go either way depending on how easy it is for Chrome users to opt out themselves.

“Instead of comparing FLoC to its predecessor, third party cookies, I feel it’s actually more like the Facebook Pixel – mostly in the sense that it’s controlled by a single surveillance capital company,” WordPress core contributor Roy Tanck commented on the trac ticket for the discussion. “FLoC may not be quite as nefarious, but I feel it should be something website owners consciously opt into.

“WordPress has always advocated for a free and open web, and FLoC appears to actively harm that goal. I think WordPress should take a stand against this, and do it now.”

A few others have chimed in on the ticket recently as other open source projects have started blocking FLoC by default. Plugin developer David McCan’s comment referenced analytics data published in early May suggesting that US users choose to opt out of tracking 96 percent of the time following the changes in iOS 14.5.

“There is no doubt that coming down on the side of user privacy vs user tracking is the right thing to do,” McCan said. “Which headline would we rather see? ‘By default millions of WordPress websites are allowing users to be tracked’ or ‘WordPress takes steps to block user tracking making millions of websites around the world safe to visit?’

“We already have a policy that opt-in by default tracking’ is not allowed in plugins hosted by WordPress. This is because we recognize the responsibility and benefit of protecting user privacy.”

During a live marketing event Google hosted at the end of last week, Jerry Dischler, vice president and general manager of Ads, addressed the recent privacy concerns surrounding FLoC.

“We’ll be using these [Privacy Sandbox] APIs for our own ads and measurement products just like everyone else, and we will not build any backdoors for ourselves,” Dischler said.

Dischler also reaffirmed Google’s commitment to moving away from third-party cookies.

“Third-party cookies and other proposed identifiers that some in the industry are advocating for do not meet the rising expectations consumers have when it comes to privacy,” he said. “They will not stand up to rapidly evolving regulatory restrictions; they simply cannot be relied on in the long term.”

Google bears the burden of reassuring advertisers that effective advertising is still possible as the company moves beyond tracking cookies. It is aiming to future-proof advertisers’ measurement of campaign performance with what it claims are “privacy-safe solutions.” The company is pushing hard for advertisers to adopt these new techniques, promising more actionable first-party conversion data.

Although consumer expectations have changed, FLoC may not be the answer to the need for a privacy-preserving advertising model. So far it looks like Google will have an uphill battle to gain more broad support from browsers, advertisers, and consumers.

WPTavern: Chrome Canary Adds Flag for Disabling FLoC Testing

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 06/02/2021 - 03:12

Google’s controversial Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoC) experiment now has a feature flag within Chrome Canary (the nightly build of Chrome for developers) that allows users to opt out.

In January 2020, Google announced its plans to discontinue support for third-party cookies in Chrome within two years. The first bits and pieces of the company’s Privacy Sandbox initiative started landing in Chrome in December 2020 with an initial flag to disable it. FLoC, Google’s proposed replacement for third-party cookies, began testing as a developer origin trial in Chrome at the end of March 2021.

In Canary, users can navigate to chrome://flags/#privacy-sandbox-settings-2 to find the Privacy Sandbox Settings 2 flag.

Relaunch Canary to save the changes. This will unlock the box that allows users to either reset their FLoC group or opt out of FLoC entirely. The new setting is available under chrome://settings/privacySandbox:

If the setting remains enabled, which is the default, Chrome will group users into cohorts based on recent browsing activity and then advertisers select ads for the entire group. Browsing activity for the individual is “kept private on your device,” but Chrome certainly has access that information by way of mediating the cohorts. Google notes that the trial is currently only active in some regions.

Users can also opt out of Privacy Sandbox trials on the same page. Current trials include the following:

  • Advertisers and publishers can use FLoC
  • Advertisers and publishers can study the effectiveness of ads in a way that does not track you across sites

Google has not specified how users would opt out of FLoC if the experiment is successful and moves forward. Organizations and site owners who are currently on the fence about it may go either way depending on how easy it is for Chrome users to opt out themselves.

“Instead of comparing FLoC to its predecessor, third party cookies, I feel it’s actually more like the Facebook Pixel – mostly in the sense that it’s controlled by a single surveillance capital company,” WordPress core contributor Roy Tanck commented on the trac ticket for the discussion. “FLoC may not be quite as nefarious, but I feel it should be something website owners consciously opt into.

“WordPress has always advocated for a free and open web, and FLoC appears to actively harm that goal. I think WordPress should take a stand against this, and do it now.”

A few others have chimed in on the ticket recently as other open source projects have started blocking FLoC by default. Plugin developer David McCan’s comment referenced analytics data published in early May suggesting that US users choose to opt out of tracking 96 percent of the time following the changes in iOS 14.5.

“There is no doubt that coming down on the side of user privacy vs user tracking is the right thing to do,” McCan said. “Which headline would we rather see? ‘By default millions of WordPress websites are allowing users to be tracked’ or ‘WordPress takes steps to block user tracking making millions of websites around the world safe to visit?’

“We already have a policy that opt-in by default tracking’ is not allowed in plugins hosted by WordPress. This is because we recognize the responsibility and benefit of protecting user privacy.”

During a live marketing event Google hosted at the end of last week, Jerry Dischler, vice president and general manager of Ads, addressed the recent privacy concerns surrounding FLoC.

“We’ll be using these [Privacy Sandbox] APIs for our own ads and measurement products just like everyone else, and we will not build any backdoors for ourselves,” Dischler said.

Dischler also reaffirmed Google’s commitment to moving away from third-party cookies.

“Third-party cookies and other proposed identifiers that some in the industry are advocating for do not meet the rising expectations consumers have when it comes to privacy,” he said. “They will not stand up to rapidly evolving regulatory restrictions; they simply cannot be relied on in the long term.”

Google bears the burden of reassuring advertisers that effective advertising is still possible as the company moves beyond tracking cookies. It is aiming to future-proof advertisers’ measurement of campaign performance with what it claims are “privacy-safe solutions.” The company is pushing hard for advertisers to adopt these new techniques, promising more actionable first-party conversion data.

Although consumer expectations have changed, FLoC may not be the answer to the need for a privacy-preserving advertising model. So far it looks like Google will have an uphill battle to gain more broad support from browsers, advertisers, and consumers.

WPTavern: Chrome Canary Adds Flag for Disabling FLoC Testing

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 06/02/2021 - 03:12

Google’s controversial Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoC) experiment now has a feature flag within Chrome Canary (the nightly build of Chrome for developers) that allows users to opt out.

In January 2020, Google announced its plans to discontinue support for third-party cookies in Chrome within two years. The first bits and pieces of the company’s Privacy Sandbox initiative started landing in Chrome in December 2020 with an initial flag to disable it. FLoC, Google’s proposed replacement for third-party cookies, began testing as a developer origin trial in Chrome at the end of March 2021.

In Canary, users can navigate to chrome://flags/#privacy-sandbox-settings-2 to find the Privacy Sandbox Settings 2 flag.

Relaunch Canary to save the changes. This will unlock the box that allows users to either reset their FLoC group or opt out of FLoC entirely. The new setting is available under chrome://settings/privacySandbox:

If the setting remains enabled, which is the default, Chrome will group users into cohorts based on recent browsing activity and then advertisers select ads for the entire group. Browsing activity for the individual is “kept private on your device,” but Chrome certainly has access that information by way of mediating the cohorts. Google notes that the trial is currently only active in some regions.

Users can also opt out of Privacy Sandbox trials on the same page. Current trials include the following:

  • Advertisers and publishers can use FLoC
  • Advertisers and publishers can study the effectiveness of ads in a way that does not track you across sites

Google has not specified how users would opt out of FLoC if the experiment is successful and moves forward. Organizations and site owners who are currently on the fence about it may go either way depending on how easy it is for Chrome users to opt out themselves.

“Instead of comparing FLoC to its predecessor, third party cookies, I feel it’s actually more like the Facebook Pixel – mostly in the sense that it’s controlled by a single surveillance capital company,” WordPress core contributor Roy Tanck commented on the trac ticket for the discussion. “FLoC may not be quite as nefarious, but I feel it should be something website owners consciously opt into.

“WordPress has always advocated for a free and open web, and FLoC appears to actively harm that goal. I think WordPress should take a stand against this, and do it now.”

A few others have chimed in on the ticket recently as other open source projects have started blocking FLoC by default. Plugin developer David McCan’s comment referenced analytics data published in early May suggesting that US users choose to opt out of tracking 96 percent of the time following the changes in iOS 14.5.

“There is no doubt that coming down on the side of user privacy vs user tracking is the right thing to do,” McCan said. “Which headline would we rather see? ‘By default millions of WordPress websites are allowing users to be tracked’ or ‘WordPress takes steps to block user tracking making millions of websites around the world safe to visit?’

“We already have a policy that opt-in by default tracking’ is not allowed in plugins hosted by WordPress. This is because we recognize the responsibility and benefit of protecting user privacy.”

During a live marketing event Google hosted at the end of last week, Jerry Dischler, vice president and general manager of Ads, addressed the recent privacy concerns surrounding FLoC.

“We’ll be using these [Privacy Sandbox] APIs for our own ads and measurement products just like everyone else, and we will not build any backdoors for ourselves,” Dischler said.

Dischler also reaffirmed Google’s commitment to moving away from third-party cookies.

“Third-party cookies and other proposed identifiers that some in the industry are advocating for do not meet the rising expectations consumers have when it comes to privacy,” he said. “They will not stand up to rapidly evolving regulatory restrictions; they simply cannot be relied on in the long term.”

Google bears the burden of reassuring advertisers that effective advertising is still possible as the company moves beyond tracking cookies. It is aiming to future-proof advertisers’ measurement of campaign performance with what it claims are “privacy-safe solutions.” The company is pushing hard for advertisers to adopt these new techniques, promising more actionable first-party conversion data.

Although consumer expectations have changed, FLoC may not be the answer to the need for a privacy-preserving advertising model. So far it looks like Google will have an uphill battle to gain more broad support from browsers, advertisers, and consumers.

WPTavern: Ujwal Thapa, Co-Founder of the WordPress Nepal Community, Passes Away

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 06/01/2021 - 19:08

“Here is my resume of professional Failures,” began his LinkedIn profile. On a site where most are apt to share success, Ujwal Thapa started with nearly a two-decade history of dreams that did not quite work out. Or, maybe they did in some ways.

Much of Nepal is reeling from his death today. In the past week, he had been battling multiple health complications from Covid-19. The 44-year-old activist was the founder of the Bibeksheel Nepali political party, originally a peaceful movement that fought against political corruption and social injustice.

However, many Nepali WordPress users will remember him as a co-founder of their community. The WordPress Nepal Facebook group has now grown to nearly 8,000 members.

Photos shared by Ganga Kafle.

In a 2015 interview with Nepal Buzz, he noted his proudest WordPress-related achievement as building this community. “That is not just creating tens and hundreds, but thousands of jobs in Nepal, and has the potential to create tens of thousands more, which basically means we are contributing to the nation by creating opportunities where there are none.”

Later in the interview, he said he was a provoker, and he continued to live the remainder of his life in that belief.

“I believe that the easiest way to bring change is to align all the positive people in the same direction,” he said. “So my job is to provoke and bring together people with similar interests, and align them in a similar direction, creating the change that they would never believe could come.”

Thapa founded Digital Max Solutions in 2002, amidst the Nepalese Civil War. At one point, the company had as many as 35 employees. Over 30 eventually moved on to start their own IT businesses. He also created the Entrepreneurs for Nepal Facebook group, which now has over 100,000 members. From May 2013 to October 2019, he served as the Chairperson of the BibekSheel Nepali party.

Many in Nepal’s WordPress community owe him a debt of gratitude for having the vision of building off the core platform. WordPress.org Themes Team representative Ganga Kafle credits at least part of his career and deep involvement with WordPress to Thapa, helping him land an initial internship with Web Experts Nepal.

“Ujwal Thapa is the person who introduced WordPress to me in 2012 in a meetup,” he said. “After that, I was in close relation with him. In 2014, after my graduation, I went to Ujwal and asked him about the internship, and he took me to that office and talked with the boss and finalized for the internship. That’s how I jumped in WordPress, and now I am one of the leads of Themes Team.”

“Once he said to me, ‘WordPress is giving so much things for free, why you hesitate to put Proudly Powered by WordPress?'” Kafle shared of the mentor, referencing the typical credit line in many WordPress site footers. “He was in love with WordPress.”

You can view Thapa’s WordCamp presentations as a speaker and panel moderator via WordPress.tv.

WPTavern: Ujwal Thapa, Co-Founder of the WordPress Nepal Community, Passes Away

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 06/01/2021 - 19:08

“Here is my resume of professional Failures,” began his LinkedIn profile. On a site where most are apt to share success, Ujwal Thapa started with nearly a two-decade history of dreams that did not quite work out. Or, maybe they did in some ways.

Much of Nepal is reeling from his death today. In the past week, he had been battling multiple health complications from Covid-19. The 44-year-old activist was the founder of the Bibeksheel Nepali political party, originally a peaceful movement that fought against political corruption and social injustice.

However, many Nepali WordPress users will remember him as a co-founder of their community. The WordPress Nepal Facebook group has now grown to nearly 8,000 members.

Photos shared by Ganga Kafle.

In a 2015 interview with Nepal Buzz, he noted his proudest WordPress-related achievement as building this community. “That is not just creating tens and hundreds, but thousands of jobs in Nepal, and has the potential to create tens of thousands more, which basically means we are contributing to the nation by creating opportunities where there are none.”

Later in the interview, he said he was a provoker, and he continued to live the remainder of his life in that belief.

“I believe that the easiest way to bring change is to align all the positive people in the same direction,” he said. “So my job is to provoke and bring together people with similar interests, and align them in a similar direction, creating the change that they would never believe could come.”

Thapa founded Digital Max Solutions in 2002, amidst the Nepalese Civil War. At one point, the company had as many as 35 employees. Over 30 eventually moved on to start their own IT businesses. He also created the Entrepreneurs for Nepal Facebook group, which now has over 100,000 members. From May 2013 to October 2019, he served as the Chairperson of the BibekSheel Nepali party.

Many in Nepal’s WordPress community owe him a debt of gratitude for having the vision of building off the core platform. WordPress.org Themes Team representative Ganga Kafle credits at least part of his career and deep involvement with WordPress to Thapa, helping him land an initial internship with Web Experts Nepal.

“Ujwal Thapa is the person who introduced WordPress to me in 2012 in a meetup,” he said. “After that, I was in close relation with him. In 2014, after my graduation, I went to Ujwal and asked him about the internship, and he took me to that office and talked with the boss and finalized for the internship. That’s how I jumped in WordPress, and now I am one of the leads of Themes Team.”

“Once he said to me, ‘WordPress is giving so much things for free, why you hesitate to put Proudly Powered by WordPress?'” Kafle shared of the mentor, referencing the typical credit line in many WordPress site footers. “He was in love with WordPress.”

You can view Thapa’s WordCamp presentations as a speaker and panel moderator via WordPress.tv.

WPTavern: Ujwal Thapa, Co-Founder of the WordPress Nepal Community, Passes Away

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 06/01/2021 - 19:08

“Here is my resume of professional Failures,” began his LinkedIn profile. On a site where most are apt to share success, Ujwal Thapa started with nearly a two-decade history of dreams that did not quite work out. Or, maybe they did in some ways.

Much of Nepal is reeling from his death today. In the past week, he had been battling multiple health complications from Covid-19. The 44-year-old activist was the founder of the Bibeksheel Nepali political party, originally a peaceful movement that fought against political corruption and social injustice.

However, many Nepali WordPress users will remember him as a co-founder of their community. The WordPress Nepal Facebook group has now grown to nearly 8,000 members.

Photos shared by Ganga Kafle.

In a 2015 interview with Nepal Buzz, he noted his proudest WordPress-related achievement as building this community. “That is not just creating tens and hundreds, but thousands of jobs in Nepal, and has the potential to create tens of thousands more, which basically means we are contributing to the nation by creating opportunities where there are none.”

Later in the interview, he said he was a provoker, and he continued to live the remainder of his life in that belief.

“I believe that the easiest way to bring change is to align all the positive people in the same direction,” he said. “So my job is to provoke and bring together people with similar interests, and align them in a similar direction, creating the change that they would never believe could come.”

Thapa founded Digital Max Solutions in 2002, amidst the Nepalese Civil War. At one point, the company had as many as 35 employees. Over 30 eventually moved on to start their own IT businesses. He also created the Entrepreneurs for Nepal Facebook group, which now has over 100,000 members. From May 2013 to October 2019, he served as the Chairperson of the BibekSheel Nepali party.

Many in Nepal’s WordPress community owe him a debt of gratitude for having the vision of building off the core platform. WordPress.org Themes Team representative Ganga Kafle credits at least part of his career and deep involvement with WordPress to Thapa, helping him land an initial internship with Web Experts Nepal.

“Ujwal Thapa is the person who introduced WordPress to me in 2012 in a meetup,” he said. “After that, I was in close relation with him. In 2014, after my graduation, I went to Ujwal and asked him about the internship, and he took me to that office and talked with the boss and finalized for the internship. That’s how I jumped in WordPress, and now I am one of the leads of Themes Team.”

“Once he said to me, ‘WordPress is giving so much things for free, why you hesitate to put Proudly Powered by WordPress?'” Kafle shared of the mentor, referencing the typical credit line in many WordPress site footers. “He was in love with WordPress.”

You can view Thapa’s WordCamp presentations as a speaker and panel moderator via WordPress.tv.

WPTavern: Breaking Down WPMarmite’s 127-Shop Full Site Editing Study

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 06/01/2021 - 00:36

Earlier today, the WPMarmite team released a massive study of 127 WordPress theme shops. It primarily focused on integration with the block editor. The team also surveyed 22 of the shops directly to dive deeper into what the future might look like when the Full Site Editing (FSE) project is entirely bundled into the core platform, which could be around the WordPress 5.9 release in late 2021.

FSE is not a single thing that WordPress will drop on users all at once. It is an ongoing project with several independent but related components that will ship based on their readiness. The goal is to move the block system beyond just content, bringing blocks into all facets of a site’s front end.

Single post/page template editing and block-based widgets are expected to arrive with WordPress 5.8 in July. These are two user-facing components that serve as stepping stones toward a complete FSE experience.

Putting study into context, FSE-related discussion for theme authors is mainly about block templates and global styles. These components will create a drastic change to theme development where templates are made up of blocks themselves and styles are configured via a JSON file. For the first time in WordPress’s history, users will be able to directly edit both from an interface in their site admin without knowing any code.

Upcoming site editor with templates (left panel) and global styles (right panel).

WordPress 5.0, the first version to include blocks, launched two and a half years ago. Theme authors have had time to catch up, migrate old projects, and create new ones. WPMarmite’s study gives a solid, at-a-glance view of how shops are fairing now that the shockwave of the block system’s introduction has long settled.

The Study: Block Editor Support

The primary takeaway from the 127-shop study was that 57% of them featured their compatibility with the block editor in some way. Short of testing themes from each site individually or directly asking them all, there is no other way to know how many actually offer support. My guess is the number is not much higher.

Technically, all themes “work” with the WordPress editor. However, not all are designed from the ground up to offer an ideal experience with it. As a commercial theme shop, you would want to mention this support somewhere in your marketing.

Even if that 57% is dead-on, a shop featuring block support does not always mean solid support. In my experience of viewing themes and their demos almost daily, “support” often means minimal adjustments to make sure the basics do not break the site. That number is far lower if you are counting themes that offer an immersive block-editor experience.

The number that was surprising but not surprising was the percentage of shops currently providing block patterns. Only 3% (4 in total) bundle custom patterns.

Inserting a block pattern into the WordPress editor.

While the patterns API has only been around since WordPress 5.5, released less than a year ago, it is one of those crucial tools for the future of theme development. I thought the number was low. I just did not know it was 3% low.

If 57% of shops offer some level of block editor support, why are they stopping short of complete integration and not using the most powerful features at their disposal?

Patterns are part of that immersive experience I mentioned. If a shop does not have any, I would question how much it actually supports the block system.

In the WordPress.org free theme directory, that percentage is much higher. Currently, 514 themes add block editor styles, and 120 bundle at least one pattern.

Note: if you combine those two filters, the directory lists 107 themes. Some could be missing a tag.

One data point the team missed was how many of these theme shops integrated with third-party page builders. I would wager that most of the ThemeForest authors support at least one additional builder, maybe two. It is almost a sure-fire bet that Elementor and Beaver Builder top that list. While the study was on the core block system, this would have given us a more accurate look at the current theme market.

The Survey: FSE and the Future

Of the 127 shops, WPMarmite surveyed 22 of them with questions around FSE. The most telling statistic is that 82% of shops follow FSE-related news, citing WP Tavern as one of their sources. Thank you, dear readers.

On a more serious note, 86% of those surveyed believe that FSE will be a breakthrough for users. I am not surprised at this. Many features that theme authors have attempted to accomplish over the last decade are being rolled into the Gutenberg plugin. It is a slow process, but having the pieces built into WordPress provides standard APIs that will make themers’ jobs easier. In turn, this will allow them to launch features that users ask for with less code and a faster turnaround.

The number I want to see higher is those actively preparing for block templates and global styles. According to the survey, only 22% are doing so.

These components are continually in flux. However, the foundational elements are far more stable than they were just a few months ago. This makes it a good moment for others to start diving in — there is less chance of breaking changes with the system. I expect the percentage of commercial theme shops working with FSE to jump throughout the year. However, it could be a slow process getting to the point where such themes are commonplace. We may need to see a breakout block theme that quickly rises in popularity first. Everyone else will fall in line.

In the meantime, if anyone wants to experiment with FSE, there are six themes listed in the directory.

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