Wordpress News

HeroPress: Becoming A Successful WordPress Freelancer In India

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 07/24/2019 - 17:29
The Back Story

In the final year of my Engineering degree, my Head of Department summoned my friend and me to his office. Both of us were not the highest scoring students but we were the most active ones. For our major project rather than building just anything, he wanted us to build a PBX software that our college needed and was already paying for to an outside vendor.

It was a difficult one, we didn’t know it was possible to make Phone calls from the browser. My friend and I spent the next 3 months researching and building the software. When we were about to deploy it, we realize that the software won’t talk to the driver of the PRI card. Only 15 days were left for the final exams and if we didn’t build the project on time, it would never see the light of the sun.

We spend every waking hour on the software for the next 7 days and made it work. When it worked, our HOD used that software to call the Chairman of college, he congratulated us and we got the best project award for that. It was the moment when I said to myself, if I can pull this off, I can do anything and promised myself to do something significant in the world of computers.

Hello WordPress

It was 2012, the time when Web was taking over the World, desktop applications were being replaced by websites, and HTML, CSS and jQuery were becoming more and more powerful.

I would spend hours and hours sitting in front of my desktop learning and playing with these technologies. My parents used to think that I was always wasting my time all day.

My dad was convinced that I’d join him in his business because I wasn’t good enough for anything else.

One day, I saw a post of my Facebook Friend. He wanted someone to build a website for him. I contacted him and gave him an estimate, he agreed and that was my first web project. The project was completed successfully and I got the payment. My confidence was in the sky.

Fortunately, I got another project. This time it was a big one, an ecommerce website. I spent 4 months working on that and completed it successfully but I realized it was a lot of work and the pay was not good enough.

I didn’t know WordPress back then but I knew there would be something that would make developing websites easier. A few months later when I checked WordPress, I was blown away to see the capabilities of this CMS. Adding features like Login with Facebook, Shopping cart, Contact Form, Captcha would only take a few minutes. The things which would take a day or even a week were as simple as installing a plugin and configuring the settings.

I realized that the e-commerce project that I built on core PHP could have been done within 15 days if I had chosen WordPress. It was a win-win for me as my clients. Since then, WordPress is my de facto choice for all web projects.

About Today..

I’m an Independent WordPress contractor. I work on designing and implementing web pages, themes and plugins for WordPress, helping clients to troubleshoot and fix their WordPress websites, designing themes that are as functional as they are beautiful, working with startups to quickly set up their MVP, and developing websites for corporates which reflect their brand.

I’m leading a happy and balanced life. I’m content, I have a great set of customers. I have the liberty to change my working hours to manage time for my hobbies and family.

Sure I don’t make as much money as a CEO but I do have a balanced and happy life. And it does sound exciting but the path wasn’t all easy. In this article, I try to give my best advice which I learned the hard way and I so much wish someone had told me about all this when I was getting started.

1. Be a specialist

General Physicians don’t make as much money as specialists make. The world is huge, even a small field like Software Engineering is too big that you can’t master everything in it.

You have to be the greatest in your field if you want to charge a premium amount. You need to be someone who has encountered and fixed every possible problem in that field. You should know your thing like the back of your hand. AND to be able to get there you need to find your thing and be very specific about it. You need to say NO to everything else.

It sounds obvious and easy, right? It isn’t. I can bet that 90% of the people out there are not doing this. I’d say It is not their fault. We, humans, are curious creatures and we get bored easily, that is why when we see a new shiny technology we want to learn that.

This is in our nature but our nature is keeping us from achieving greatness. You want to be great at something, be ready to embrace boredom and put in thousands of hours of practice.

“Pick your niche and say no to everything else”

2. Understand that not every job is for you.

Someone on amazon is selling 1500 Live Ladybugs and what shocks me more is the fact that someone is even buying them. But, we shouldn’t be all judgemental because everything has a buyer and everything has a seller.

When I had started freelancing on Upwork, I’d also get in the race-to-the-bottom along with the other freelancers who were willing to work for literally $3/h. I’d think that it will never be possible for me to get away from this race and making good money.

It took me years, I had to work with many bad client projects for peanuts to realize that I’m a different product and I need a different buyer.

I increased my rates 8 times and dedicated myself to give the best possible service I can to my clients. What happened next shook my whole belief system. Not only people were paying me the premium amount, I was getting more customers. As you go up there is lesser competition.

3. Not everyone who gives you money is your client. Some client might suck the joy out of work. Stay far away from them.

Let’s be honest, there are some people that we don’t like and there are some people who don’t like us. If you were in a job, there would be no choice but to bear with the irrational and arrogant boss of yours but thank god, you are a freelancer. You have the liberty to choose the people you want to work with.

Sometimes the best thing you can do is say NO even if that means you have to lose money.

4. Know your worth and charge that much:

Imagine, if you are in a public place and a stranger comes up to you and asks you to buy his $5 bill for $1. What would you think? Most of us will not buy that $5 bill even if it is a great deal, you are getting an extra $4 in the exchange. Because we are hardwired to believe that all too-good-to-be-true deals are scams.

While setting your hourly rates, it is important to make sure that you are charging a correct amount. Lowballing isn’t helpful for those clients which you want to work with. The right clients are the probably the businessmen who know that to get good work you have to spend good money and they are there to spend the money. Are you able to do the good work?

5. Experience what your client is experiencing; think what your client is thinking

I’m a web developer and I do need help from other freelancers at times to deliver my project. I hire the best freelancers on Upwork for my job and I notice everything that they do. I notice their way of sending the proposals, their way of presenting the work, their way of negotiation when I, as a client, ask for more free work.

This activity will help you learn that there are so many things which you think are right in your head are so incorrect and can be so much better.

6. Don’t sell technologies, sell solutions

“People don’t want to buy a quarter-inch drill, they want a quarter-inch hole.”
Theodore Levitt

Don’t be a React Developer, Photoshop Designer or Final Cut Pro Editor. Be a problem solver. Nobody hires a writer because he can use MS Word, a writer is hired because he can write persuasive writing. The copy that can convert visitors to customers. You need the ability to sell solutions, not technology.

The post Becoming A Successful WordPress Freelancer In India appeared first on HeroPress.

WPTavern: WordCamp Asia Set for February 21-23, 2020, in Bangkok, Thailand

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 07/24/2019 - 00:59

The first ever WordCamp Asia has launched a teaser website and announced February 21-23, 2020, as the dates for the event. This will be the first regional WordCamp for the continent, which is home to 127 WordPress meetup chapters with 73,000 members across 23 countries, according to stats from lead organizer Naoko Takano. After four years in planning, and 137 WordCamps in 18 Asian countries and 52 cities, the region is finally ready to collaborate on a larger event that will bring its many diverse communities together.

“We hope that this first flagship event in the region can help the WordPress and open source community to grow even further,” Takano said. “We are really excited to be working on creating a place where community members can learn from and get inspired by each other.”

The organizing team has a vision to make the WordCamp welcoming, nurturing, and experimental. They are working to make it an inclusive, affordable, and interactive event. WordCamp Asia’s three-day program will begin with Contributor Day, followed by two days of presentations with an estimated 1,000 attendees.

Organizers have already put out the call for media partners, including magazines, newspapers, TV stations, radio stations, bloggers, influencers, WordPress enthusiasts and freelance journalists. The call for speakers will be open until mid-November 2019. Check out WordCamp Asia’s roadmap to get an idea of what to expect as the preparations continue.

Carapace

Drupal Themes - Tue, 07/23/2019 - 21:27

An AdaptiveTheme sub-theme customized to optimize the Islandora experience.

WPTavern: New Experimental Plugin Brings the Block Editor to WordPress Comments

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 07/23/2019 - 20:35

Block Comments is a new experimental plugin from Tom Nowell that replaces WordPress’ default comment form with a trimmed down version of the block editor. Nowell gave a presentation at WordCamp Europe 2019 about using blocks outside the editor, including on the frontend. Block Comments is one example he brought to life using the block list component along with some wrapper components.

The result is a comment form that offers the same UI as the WordPress editor but with a limited set of blocks appropriate for commenting and no block sidebar panel. This includes text-based and embed blocks, along with image upload via URL. It defaults to the paragraph block when the commenter clicks inside the form. Here is an example of using the block editor for a reply on the Twenty Nineteen theme:

For the most part, Block Comments should fit in with the style of the active theme, as shown below with an example using the Astrid theme. Nowell recommends users watch out for occasional clashes between the editor UI CSS and the theme’s CSS, since it is still early beta software.

Incorporating the block editor into commenting could make formatting easier for commenters with more options for expressing themselves. The plugin includes blocks for lists, quotes, code, embeds, headings, pre-formatted text, and other formats, all with Gutenberg’s built in preview. Commenters can immediately see how the comment will appear without having to struggle with using the correct format tags.

“I see it as a much more flexible form of those Tiny MCE visual comment forms,” Nowell said. “Except instead of just putting a toolbar on top and showing you bold and italic in-line, you can do more.”

Nowell said replies and threading work exactly the same with Block Comments enabled. The UI for the comment form is the only thing that changes, but the commenting system remains the same.

Bringing the block editor to comments is not yet on WordPress’ roadmap. The UI is different from the comment forms users have become accustomed to over the years of commenting on the internet. Some commenters may find it confusing if this is their first experience with WordPress’ block editor. For those who have used WordPress 5.0+ previously, the Gutenberg-powered comment form brings a little more unity to the front and backend posting experiences.

“It’s certainly not for every comment form, but I can see it being very useful in some situations, such as P2 blogs,” Nowell said. “As Gutenberg itself improves, it will too.”

Block Comments is currently available on GitHub where users can report any issues or conflicts. It is recommended to be used with the Gutenberg plugin installed for best results. It also doesn’t play well with the Classic Editor plugin, since that plugin removes the block editor hooks and styles.

I would not be surprised to see this experiment further developed for P2-powered blogs or even Jetpack comments , if the idea catches on. These avenues would provide a good testing ground for such a feature before it might be considered for WordPress core.

BuddyPress: BuddyPress 4.4.0 Security and Maintenance release

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 07/23/2019 - 07:45

BuddyPress 4.4.0 is now available. This is a security and maintenance release. All BuddyPress installations are strongly encouraged to upgrade as soon as possible.

The 4.4.0 release addresses two security issues:

  • A privilege escalation vulnerability was fixed that could allow user who is not a friend with another user to send him a group invite even though this “another user” has selected to restrict group invites from friends only (This is specific to the BP Nouveau template). Discovered by Yuvraj Dighe.
  • An XSS vulnerability was fixed in the single Group’s RSS link meta for group names. Discovered by wxy7174.

These vulnerabilities were reported privately to the BuddyPress team, in accordance with WordPress’s security policies. Our thanks to the reporters for practicing coordinated disclosure.

BuddyPress 4.4.0 also fixes 2 bugs. For complete details, visit the 4.4.0 changelog.

Donncha: WP Super Cache 1.6.3

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 08/17/2018 - 16:36

WP Super Cache is a full page caching plugin for WordPress. When a page is cached almost all of WordPress is skipped and the page is sent to the browser with the minimum amount of code executed. This makes the page load much faster.

1.6.3 is the latest release and is mostly a bugfix release but it also adds some new features.

  • Added cookie helper functions (#580)
  • Added plugin helper functions (#574)
  • Added actions to modify cookie and plugin lists. (#582)
  • Really disable garbage collection when timeout = 0 (#571)
  • Added warnings about DISABLE_WP_CRON (#575)
  • Don’t clean expired cache files after preload if garbage collection is disabled (#572)
  • On preload, if deleting a post don’t delete the sub directories if it’s the homepage. (#573)
  • Fix generation of semaphores when using WP CLI (#576)
  • Fix deleting from the admin bar (#578)
  • Avoid a strpos() warning. (#579)
  • Improve deleting of cache in edit/delete/publish actions (#577)
  • Fixes to headers code (#496)

This release makes it much easier for plugin developers to interact with WP Super Cache. In the past a file had to be placed in the “WP Super Cache plugins directory” so that it would be loaded correctly but in this release I’ve added new actions that will allow you to load code from other directories too.

Use the wpsc_add_plugin action to add your plugin to a list loaded by WP Super Cache. Use it like this:

do_action( 'wpsc_add_plugin', WP_PLUGIN_DIR . '/wpsc.php' )

You can give it the full path, with or without ABSPATH. Use it after “init”. It only needs to be called once, but duplicates will not be stored.

In a similar fashion, use wpsc_delete_plugin to remove a plugin.

The release also makes it much simpler to modify the cookies used by WP Super Cache to identify “known users”. This is useful to identify particular types of pages such as translated pages that should only be shown to certain users. For example, visitors who have the English cookie will be shown cached pages in English. The German cookie will fetch German cached pages. The action wpsc_add_cookie makes this possible.

do_action( 'wpsc_add_cookie', 'language' );

Execute that in your plugin and WP Super Cache will watch out for the language cookie. The plugin will use the cookie name and value in determining what cached page to display. So “language = irish” will show a different page to “language = french”.

Use wpsc_delete_cookie to remove a cookie. Cache files won’t be deleted. It’s doubtful they’d be served however because of the hashed key used to name the filenames.

do_action( 'wpsc_delete_cookie', 'language' );

If you’re going to use either of the plugin or cookie actions here I recommend using Simple Caching. While the plugin will attempt to update mod_rewrite rules, it is much simpler to have PHP serve the files. Apart from that, any plugins loaded by WP Super Cache will be completely skipped if Expert mode is enabled.

Related Posts

Source

Donncha: WP Super Cache 1.6.3

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 08/17/2018 - 16:36

WP Super Cache is a full page caching plugin for WordPress. When a page is cached almost all of WordPress is skipped and the page is sent to the browser with the minimum amount of code executed. This makes the page load much faster.

1.6.3 is the latest release and is mostly a bugfix release but it also adds some new features.

  • Added cookie helper functions (#580)
  • Added plugin helper functions (#574)
  • Added actions to modify cookie and plugin lists. (#582)
  • Really disable garbage collection when timeout = 0 (#571)
  • Added warnings about DISABLE_WP_CRON (#575)
  • Don’t clean expired cache files after preload if garbage collection is disabled (#572)
  • On preload, if deleting a post don’t delete the sub directories if it’s the homepage. (#573)
  • Fix generation of semaphores when using WP CLI (#576)
  • Fix deleting from the admin bar (#578)
  • Avoid a strpos() warning. (#579)
  • Improve deleting of cache in edit/delete/publish actions (#577)
  • Fixes to headers code (#496)

This release makes it much easier for plugin developers to interact with WP Super Cache. In the past a file had to be placed in the “WP Super Cache plugins directory” so that it would be loaded correctly but in this release I’ve added new actions that will allow you to load code from other directories too.

Use the wpsc_add_plugin action to add your plugin to a list loaded by WP Super Cache. Use it like this:

do_action( 'wpsc_add_plugin', WP_PLUGIN_DIR . '/wpsc.php' )

You can give it the full path, with or without ABSPATH. Use it after “init”. It only needs to be called once, but duplicates will not be stored.

In a similar fashion, use wpsc_delete_plugin to remove a plugin.

The release also makes it much simpler to modify the cookies used by WP Super Cache to identify “known users”. This is useful to identify particular types of pages such as translated pages that should only be shown to certain users. For example, visitors who have the English cookie will be shown cached pages in English. The German cookie will fetch German cached pages. The action wpsc_add_cookie makes this possible.

do_action( 'wpsc_add_cookie', 'language' );

Execute that in your plugin and WP Super Cache will watch out for the language cookie. The plugin will use the cookie name and value in determining what cached page to display. So “language = irish” will show a different page to “language = french”.

Use wpsc_delete_cookie to remove a cookie. Cache files won’t be deleted. It’s doubtful they’d be served however because of the hashed key used to name the filenames.

do_action( 'wpsc_delete_cookie', 'language' );

If you’re going to use either of the plugin or cookie actions here I recommend using Simple Caching. While the plugin will attempt to update mod_rewrite rules, it is much simpler to have PHP serve the files. Apart from that, any plugins loaded by WP Super Cache will be completely skipped if Expert mode is enabled.

Related Posts

Source

Mark Jaquith: Page Links To v3.0

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 07/23/2018 - 22:02

Today I pushed an update to my redirect and repointing plugin, Page Links To. Tomorrow, this plugin will have been in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory for 13 years (it was the 339th plugin in the WordPress plugin repository; there are now over 75,000!).

To celebrate its transition to a teenager, I’ve added some new features and UI enhancements.

Last month, I received survey responses from over 800 Page Links To users and learned a lot about how it’s being put to work. One of the most interesting things I found was how many people are using it for URL redirects. For example, they might have a really long URL on their own site or someone else’s site that they want to be nice. example.com/summer-sale instead of example.com/store/specials.aspx?season=summer&_utm_source=internal. But in order to create these redirects, you have to go through the cluttered and sometimes slow post creation screen. All you really need to create a redirect is a title, a destination URL, and a local short URL.

You’ll now find a menu item “Add Page Link” that will allow you to quickly add a redirected Page without having to wait for the entire WordPress post editing interface to load. It’s super fast, and it doesn’t redirect you away from the screen you’re on.

Since short URLs are better for sharing (and remembering), the UI will give you a little push to shorten the URL if the one generated from your title is too long. From there, you can Save Draft or Publish.

Hey, that URL is getting a bit long Custom slug, for a better short URL

Additionally, this release includes a “link” indicator on post and page list screens, so you can easily see what items have been re-pointed with Page Links To. When hovered, the link icon will reveal the destination URL for a quick view.

The “link” icon means that this item has been pointed elsewhere.

If you want to grab the “local” short URL (which will be redirected to your chosen URL when someone visits it), just click “Copy Short URL” from the actions, and it’ll be in your clipboard.

Hover the “link” icon to see where it’s pointing.

That’s it for version 3.0, but I’ll have more to announce soon — stay tuned!

Mark Jaquith: Page Links To v3.0

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 07/23/2018 - 22:02

Today I pushed an update to my redirect and repointing plugin, Page Links To. Tomorrow, this plugin will have been in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory for 13 years (it was the 339th plugin in the WordPress plugin repository; there are now over 75,000!).

To celebrate its transition to a teenager, I’ve added some new features and UI enhancements.

Last month, I received survey responses from over 800 Page Links To users and learned a lot about how it’s being put to work. One of the most interesting things I found was how many people are using it for URL redirects. For example, they might have a really long URL on their own site or someone else’s site that they want to be nice. example.com/summer-sale instead of example.com/store/specials.aspx?season=summer&_utm_source=internal. But in order to create these redirects, you have to go through the cluttered and sometimes slow post creation screen. All you really need to create a redirect is a title, a destination URL, and a local short URL.

You’ll now find a menu item “Add Page Link” that will allow you to quickly add a redirected Page without having to wait for the entire WordPress post editing interface to load. It’s super fast, and it doesn’t redirect you away from the screen you’re on.

Since short URLs are better for sharing (and remembering), the UI will give you a little push to shorten the URL if the one generated from your title is too long. From there, you can Save Draft or Publish.

Hey, that URL is getting a bit long Custom slug, for a better short URL

Additionally, this release includes a “link” indicator on post and page list screens, so you can easily see what items have been re-pointed with Page Links To. When hovered, the link icon will reveal the destination URL for a quick view.

The “link” icon means that this item has been pointed elsewhere.

If you want to grab the “local” short URL (which will be redirected to your chosen URL when someone visits it), just click “Copy Short URL” from the actions, and it’ll be in your clipboard.

Hover the “link” icon to see where it’s pointing.

That’s it for version 3.0, but I’ll have more to announce soon — stay tuned!

Mark Jaquith: Making ScoutDocs: Build Tools

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 06/19/2018 - 17:59

Continuing my series about ScoutDocs and the process of building it, this week I’m talking about Build Tools.

What is ScoutDocs? ScoutDocs is a WordPress plugin that adds simple file-sharing to your WordPress site.

Coding in React involves JSX, a bizarre-but-wonderful XML syntax that you dump directly into the middle of your JavaScript code. It feels exquisitely wrong. Browsers agree, so your JSX-containing JS code will have to be transpiled to regular JavaScript. This can involve using a complex maze of tools. Babel, NPM, Webpack, Browserify, Gulp, Grunt, Uglify, Uglifyify (yes, you read that right), and more. You have decisions to make, and you will find fierce advocates for various solutions.

For ScoutDocs, I decided to go with Grunt for task running, because I was already comfortable with it, and I needed it for grunt-wp-deploy. Use a task runner you are already comfortable with. Even if it is just NPM scripts. You’re learning a lot of new things already. It’s okay to keep your task runner setup.

Next, I had to choose a JS bundler which would let me write and use modular code that gets pulled together into a browser-executable bundle. After deliberating between Webpack and Browserify, I chose Browserify. Webpack is really complicated. It is also very powerful. I recommend you avoid it until you need it. I haven’t needed it yet, and found Browserify to be easier to configure and use, even though it’s a bit on the slow side.

As I was building ScoutDocs and tweaking my dev tools, tweaking my Grunt file, and writing code to search/replace strings etc, I began to feel like the time I was spending too much time on tooling. Was I becoming one of those people who spend all their time listening to productivity podcasts instead of… being productive? I can see how someone could get sucked into that trap, but putting a reasonable amount of time into configuring your development tools can pay dividends for you beyond simply the time saved. It can also prevent mistakes, keep you in coding mode more often, and increasing your confidence in your code builds. Spend the time up front to make your tools work for you.

Other posts in this series:

 

Lorelle on WP: Vulnerability in phpMyAdmin Requires Immediate Patch

Wordpress Planet - Sat, 01/06/2018 - 16:55

A critical CSRF Vulnerability in phpMyAdmin Database administration tool has been found and a patch is available for all computers and servers running the MySQL database.

Does this include you?

If you are using WordPress, yes it does.

Contact your web host to ensure phpMyAdmin is updated immediately.

If you are self-hosted and manage your own server, update phpMyAdmin immediately.

If you are using WordPress or phpMyAdmin and MySQL on your computer through WAMP, MAMP, XAMPP, Instant WordPress, DesktopServer, BitNami or any of the other ways you can install WordPress on your computer or a stick (USB), update phpMyAdmin by using the patch or check the install technique’s site for updates.

If you are using WordPress.com, don’t worry. This does not apply to you or your site.

The flaw affects phpMyAdmin versions 4.7.x prior to 4.7.7. Hopefully, your server/web host company has been updating phpMyAdmin all along and you don’t need to worry, but even though this is a medium security vulnerability, it is your responsibility as a site owner and administrator to ensure that your site is safe. Don’t just rely on GoDaddy, Dreamhost, or whatever hosting service you use to take care of these things for you. Sometimes they are on top of these before an announcement is made public. Other times, they are clueless and require customer intervention and nagging.

Now, what is phpMyAdmin?

MySQL is an open source database program, and phpMyAdmin is the free, open source tool that makes the administration and use of MySQL easier to manage. It is not a database. It is a database manager. You can easily search and replace data in the database, make changes, and do other maintenance and utility tasks in the database.

Every installation of WordPress requires PHP and MySQL along with a variety of other web-based programming packages and software. Most installations by web hosts and portable versions of WordPress add phpMyAdmin to manage the WordPress site. It is not required for WordPress to work, but don’t assume that it is or isn’t installed. CHECK.

To find out if phpMyAdmin is installed on your site:

  1. Check with your web host and ask. Don’t expect their customer service staff to know for sure. Make them check your account and verify whether or not it is installed, and if they’ve updated. Push them for a specific answer.
  2. Check the site admin interface (cPanel, Plesk, etc.) to see if it is installed.
  3. Log into your site through secure FTP into the root (if you have access) and look for the installation at /usr/share/phpmyadmin or localhost/phpmyadmin. Unfortunately, it could be anywhere depending upon the installation as these are virtual folders, not folders found on your computer, so it must be assigned to a location.
  4. If running a portable installation of MySQL and/or WordPress, follow the instructions for that tool and download and install all patches to ensure phpMyAdmin is updated to the latest secure version.

bbPress: bbPress 2.5.14

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 09/12/2017 - 19:39

Today we are releasing bbPress 2.5.14, which fixes a few small bugs we’ve noticed since 2.5.13 was released, in particular we’ve fixed some incompatibilities when using PHP 7.1, an unexpected debug notice with the Topics & Replies widgets, and improved validation and sanitization of database properties with the forum converter.

Also, remember that since bbPress 2.5.12, the minimum WordPress version allowed is 4.7. If you need to use a previous version of WordPress, you will want to continue to use 2.5.11.

bbPress 2.6 is still in the release candidate phase while we tie up some loose ends across WordPress.org, but I’ll let you know when it’s ready to go!

Lorelle on WP: WordPress School: Shortcodes

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 08/18/2017 - 11:02

WordPress shortcodes are abbreviated code placed into the WordPress Visual or Text Editors that expands into a larger code structure. As we continue with Lorelle’s WordPress School free online course, it’s time to explore the basics of WordPress shortcodes.

The following is the embed code for a Google Map, pointing to one of my favorite local museums, The Rice Northwest Rocks and Minerals Museum in Hillsboro, Oregon:

<a href="https://www.google.com/maps/embed?pb=!1m18!1m12!1m3!1d2792.809130780463!2d-122.94987648443889!3d45.57427677910247!2m3!1f0!2f0!3f0!3m2!1i1024!2i768!4f13.1!3m3!1m2!1s0x54950456e76e254b%3A0xdfad5d11bde5b6cc!2s26385+NW+Groveland+Dr%2C+Hillsboro%2C+OR+97124!5e0!3m2!1sen!2sus!4v1502560000052">https://www.google.com/maps/embed?pb=!1m18!1m12!1m3!1d2792.809130780463!2d-122.94987648443889!3d45.57427677910247!2m3!1f0!2f0!3f0!3m2!1i1024!2i768!4f13.1!3m3!1m2!1s0x54950456e76e254b%3A0xdfad5d11bde5b6cc!2s26385+NW+Groveland+Dr%2C+Hillsboro%2C+OR+97124!5e0!3m2!1sen!2sus!4v1502560000052</a>

When the post or Page is saved, WordPress.com automatically converts it to the embed code for Google Maps like this:

[googlemaps https://www.google.com/maps/embed?pb=!1m18!1m12!1m3!1d2792.809130780463!2d-122.94987648443889!3d45.57427677910247!2m3!1f0!2f0!3f0!3m2!1i1024!2i768!4f13.1!3m3!1m2!1s0x54950456e76e254b%3A0xdfad5d11bde5b6cc!2s26385+NW+Groveland+Dr%2C+Hillsboro%2C+OR+97124!5e0!3m2!1sen!2sus!4v1502560000052&w=600&h=450]

This is what you see in your Visual or Text/HTML editors. Doesn’t look like a map, yet, does it?

When the post is previewed or published, you will see the map like this:

The map is not a screenshot. It is interactive. Zoom in and out and move around on the map. The Google Maps shortcode taps into the Google Maps API allowing a live section of the map to be embedded on your site to help people find locations and directions.

Google Maps are a great way of providing instructions to the location of a store or company on a Contact web page. They are also fun to embed in a post about a favorite park, hike, fishing hole, vacation spot, or even create a custom map that charts your travels, hikes, or a specific route for shopping or exploring.

NOTE: Google Map embeds are tricky. You need to search for the exact address and use that embed code. If you search for a business name, you may get an invalid server request from Google Maps. Also note that WordPress.com has made it easier to use shortcodes by skipping the extra code and converting links and embed codes automatically to shortcodes. This may require saving your post as a draft twice before you can see the results on the front end preview of the post or Page.

Shortcodes allow the user to add content and functionality to a WordPress site without knowing extensive code or digging into the programming of a WordPress Theme or Plugin. With the shortcut of a shortcode, WordPress users may add all sorts of customization features to their site.

There are a variety of shortcodes in the core of WordPress. WordPress Themes have the ability to enable or disable these, and add more, as do WordPress Plugins.

Let’s experiment with the Archives Shortcode.

  1. Add a New Page to your site. Title it “Site Map” or “Archives.”
  2. Type in [archives].
  3. Preview, then publish the post when ready to see a listing of all of the published posts on your site in a list.

Check out my site map as an example of what’s possible.

What You Need to Know About WordPress Shortcodes

Shortcodes come with WordPress out of the box, and also with WordPress Themes and Plugins. These snippets of code allow the user to add functionality to their site without touching the code.

The PHP code that enables the functionality, and adds the ability to use the abbreviated code to generate that functionality on the site, is called a function.

At its core, this is the function found to generate all WordPress Shortcodes:

//[foobar] function foobar_func( $atts ){ return "foo and bar"; } add_shortcode( 'foobar', 'foobar_func' );

The attributes, represented in this abbreviated version by $atts, are the instructions as to what the shortcode is to do.

In the expanded form with functionality, I’ve called the shortcode “elephant” and set up two attribute values, “trumpet loudly” and “stomp.”

// [elephant foo="foo-value"] function elephant_func( $atts ) { $a = shortcode_atts( array( 'foo' => 'trumpet loudly', 'bar' => 'stomp', ), $atts ); return "foo = {$a['foo']}"; } add_shortcode( 'elephant', 'elephant_func' );

Depending upon what “foo” and “bar” represent, the results would be “trumpet loudly” and “stomp.” What these represent are HTML code, modifications to HTML code, and initiates the programming such as generating a list of all the posts you’ve published as an archive list.

Right now, you aren’t at the stage where you can program shortcodes and add them to WordPress Themes or create WordPress Plugins, so I’m not going to dive into these much deeper. You need to learn how these work and how to use them on your site, and the more you use them, the better feel you will have for what a shortcode can do on your site.

WordPress.com offers a wide range of shortcodes to add functionality to your site. To learn about how to use these, see Shortcodes — Support.

Here are some examples of shortcodes to experiment with on WordPress.com.

More Information on WordPress Shortcodes Assignment

Your assignment in these WordPress School exercises is to experiment with WordPress shortcodes, specifically the ones available on WordPress.com.

I’ve listed some examples of shortcodes on WordPress.com above, and you may find more in the WordPress.com list of Shortcodes.

Your assignment is to use shortcodes to add features to your site.

  • Create a Page called “Site Map” or “Archives” and add an archive list shortcode.
  • Add a Google Map to a post or Page using the Google Maps shortcode.
  • Add a gallery to a post or Page with the gallery shortcode, testing the various options (parameters) to get the look and feel you like best.
  • Add a recipe to a post using the recipe shortcode.
  • Find another shortcode with a variety of features to experiment with. See how many ways you can change the look and feel of the content. If you wish, blog about your discoveries with screenshots or examples in the post. Let us know about it in the comments below so we can come inspect your work.

This is a tutorial from Lorelle’s WordPress School. For more information, and to join this free, year-long, online WordPress School, see:

bbPress: bbPress 2.5.13

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 07/18/2017 - 20:17

Today we are releasing bbPress 2.5.13, which fixes a few small bugs we’ve noticed since 2.5.12 was released, and also adds some sanitization to anonymous user data that went missing from previous versions.

If your site allows anonymous users (users without registered accounts) to create topics & replies in your forums, you’ll want to upgrade to 2.5.13 right away. This feature is not very widely used on public forums because spammers very aggressively target these kinds of sites, but for communities that rely on this feature, please know you can safely upgrade to 2.5.13 without any issues.

Also, remember that since bbPress 2.5.12, the minimum WordPress version allowed is 4.7. If you need to use a previous version of WordPress, you will want to continue to use 2.5.11.

bbPress 2.6 is still in the release candidate phase while we tie up some loose ends across WordPress.org, but I’ll let you know when it’s ready to go!

WordPress.tv Blog: The Humanity Of WordPress – Rich Robinkoff

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 09/23/2016 - 17:14

Rich Robinkoff “nails it” during his presentation titled The Humanity of WordPress!

Rich gave this presentation at WordCamp Columbus on August 27th and again at WordCamp Pittsburgh on September 17th. I was lucky enough to be in attendance in Pittsburgh.

He talks about human interactions and the fact that people may not realize the impact they might have on somebodies life in just a short conversation. Rich gives several examples of the relationships that can be built and the giving nature of the WordPress Community.

Please watch until the end as Rich talks about the contributions to the WordPress Community by #WPMOM.

See more great WordCamp videos at WordPress.tv »

 

 

WordPress.tv Blog: Data-Driven SEO with Google Analytics – Rebecca Haden

Wordpress Planet - Sat, 09/10/2016 - 00:16

SEO can be confusing if you rely on tips and tricks. Instead, you can rely on data from your own website.This presentation by Rebecca Haden from  WordCamp Fayetteville 2016 helps you to get to know Google Analytics and other analytics tools with WordPress plugins, find the actionable information in your analytics reports, and implement your own SEO strategy.

Presentation Slides »

More great WordCamp videos on WordPress.tv »

WP Mobile Apps: WordPress for iOS: Version 6.4

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 08/26/2016 - 12:27

Hi there, WordPress users! Version 6.4 of the WordPress for iOS app is now available in the App Store.

What’s New:

iPad Keyboard Shortcuts. Press down the command key on your external keyboard to see a list of available shortcuts in the main screen and in the post editor.

Share Media. Our sharing extension now supports media, too!

People Management. You can now manage your site’s users and roles using your mobile device.

Search in the Reader. The Reader now has search capability and autocompletes suggestions.

Improved Gestures. Full screen image previews can be dismissed with a swanky flick/toss gesture.

Bugs Squashed. A new homemade bug spray formula has allowed us to squash many uninvited guests.

And much more! You can see the full list of changes here.

Thank You

Thanks to all of the contributors who worked on this release:
@aerych, @astralbodies, @claudiosmweb, @diegoreymendez, @frosty, @jleandroperez, @koke, @kurzee, @kwonye, @oguzkocer, @sendhil, @SergioEstevao.

You can track the development progress for the next update by visiting our 6.5 milestone on GitHub. Until next time!

WP Mobile Apps: WordPress for Android: Version 5.7

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 08/26/2016 - 11:33

Hello WordPress users! Version 5.7 of the WordPress for Android app is now available in the Google Play Store.

New “Plans” section in My Site

Starting with 5.7, you can see your current WordPress.com plan and learn more about the benefits we offer in other plans.

Manage your followers and viewers from the “People Management” screen

You’re now able to use the app to invite new Administrators, Editors, Authors or Contributors to your site, or remove unwanted followers.

Other Changes

Version 5.7 also comes with a few other changes and fixes:

  • Reader tweaks in the Post Detail screen for tablets.
  • Keeps the “View Site” link visible for newly created users.
  • Fixes a rare crash when creating a new account.

You can track our development progress for the next release by visiting our 5.8 milestone on GitHub.

Beta

Do you like keeping up with what’s new in the app? Do you enjoy testing new stuff before anyone else? Our testers have access to beta versions with updates shipped directly through Google Play. The beta versions may have new features, new fixes — and possibly new bugs! Testers make it possible for us to improve the overall app experience, and offer us invaluable development feedback.

Want to become a tester? Opt-in!

Thank you

Thanks to our GitHub contributors: @0nko, @aforcier, @hypest, @karambir252, @khaykov, @kwonye, @maxme, @mzorz, @nbradbury, @oguzkocer, and @theck13.

Joseph: Trying Out The Twenty Sixteen Theme

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 02/10/2016 - 18:11

Switched to the Twenty Sixteen WordPress Theme.

I opted to remove the sidebar, to give more focus on the content of the page.

Joseph: Recommended Consultants

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 07/22/2015 - 14:01

My personal list of WordPress consultants has dried up ( some took full time jobs, the rest are always booked solid ). Now I’m directing people to the Recommended Consultants & Resources list from Joey Kudish.

Pages