Development News

Dcycle: HTTPS on Acquia stage environments with LetsEncrypt, semi-automated

Main Drupal Feed - Fri, 10/05/2018 - 00:00

I recently ran into a series of weird issues on my Acquia production environment which I traced back to some code I deployed which depended on my site being served security using HTTPS.

Acquia Staging environments don’t use HTTPS by default and require you to install SSL certificates using a tedious manual process, which in my opinion is outdated, because competitors such as Platform.sh and Pantheon support lots of automation around HTTPS using Let’s Encrypt.

Anyhow, because staging did not have HTTPS, I could not test the code, which ended up costing me an evening debugging an outage on a production environment.

I found a great blog post which explains how to set up Let’s Encrypt on Acquia environments, Installing (FREE) Let’s Encrypt SSL Certificates on Acquia, by Chris at Redfin solutions, May 2, 2017. Although the process is very well documented, I made some tweaks:

  • First, I prefer using Docker-based solutions rather than install softward on my computer. So, instead of install certbot on my Mac, I opted to use the Certbot Docker Image, this has two advantages for me: first, I don’t need to install certbot on every machine I use this script on; and second, I don’t need to worry about updating certbot, as the Docker image is updated automatically. Of course, this does require that you install Docker on your machine.
  • Second, I automated everything I could. This result in this gist (a “gist” a basically a single file hosted on Github), a script which you can install locally.
Running the script

When you put the script locally on your computer (I added it to my project code), at, say ./scripts/set-up-letsencrypt-acquia-stage.sh, and run it:

  • the first time you run it, it will tell you where to put your environment information (in ./acquia-stage-letsencrypt-environments/environment-my-acquia-project-one.source, ./acquia-stage-letsencrypt-environments/environment-my-acquia-project-two.source, etc.), and what to put in those files.
  • the next time you run it, it will automate what it can and tell you exactly what you need to do manually.

I tried this and it works for creating new certs, and should work for renewals as well!

I recently ran into a series of weird issues on my Acquia production environment which I traced back to some code I deployed which depended on my site being served security using HTTPS.

Dcycle: HTTPS on Acquia stage environments with LetsEncrypt, semi-automated

Main Drupal Feed - Fri, 10/05/2018 - 00:00

I recently ran into a series of weird issues on my Acquia production environment which I traced back to some code I deployed which depended on my site being served security using HTTPS.

Acquia Staging environments don’t use HTTPS by default and require you to install SSL certificates using a tedious manual process, which in my opinion is outdated, because competitors such as Platform.sh and Pantheon support lots of automation around HTTPS using Let’s Encrypt.

Anyhow, because staging did not have HTTPS, I could not test the code, which ended up costing me an evening debugging an outage on a production environment.

I found a great blog post which explains how to set up Let’s Encrypt on Acquia environments, Installing (FREE) Let’s Encrypt SSL Certificates on Acquia, by Chris at Redfin solutions, May 2, 2017. Although the process is very well documented, I made some tweaks:

  • First, I prefer using Docker-based solutions rather than install softward on my computer. So, instead of install certbot on my Mac, I opted to use the Certbot Docker Image, this has two advantages for me: first, I don’t need to install certbot on every machine I use this script on; and second, I don’t need to worry about updating certbot, as the Docker image is updated automatically. Of course, this does require that you install Docker on your machine.
  • Second, I automated everything I could. This result in this gist (a “gist” a basically a single file hosted on Github), a script which you can install locally.
Running the script

When you put the script locally on your computer (I added it to my project code), at, say ./scripts/set-up-letsencrypt-acquia-stage.sh, and run it:

  • the first time you run it, it will tell you where to put your environment information (in ./acquia-stage-letsencrypt-environments/environment-my-acquia-project-one.source, ./acquia-stage-letsencrypt-environments/environment-my-acquia-project-two.source, etc.), and what to put in those files.
  • the next time you run it, it will automate what it can and tell you exactly what you need to do manually.

I tried this and it works for creating new certs, and should work for renewals as well!

I recently ran into a series of weird issues on my Acquia production environment which I traced back to some code I deployed which depended on my site being served security using HTTPS.

Acquia Developer Center Blog: Experience Express in Darmstadt: Celebrating Drupal 8's Most Important Release Yet

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 10/04/2018 - 16:52

Though there was no DrupalCon Europe this year, the European Drupal community stepped up and organized their own conference, Drupal Europe, in Darmstadt, Germany last month. An incredibly successful gathering held in the Darmstadtium venue, a beautiful convention center in the center of this college town, Drupal Europe demonstrated the unique power that grassroots initiatives can have in our open-source community.

Tags: acquia drupal planet

Acquia Developer Center Blog: Experience Express in Darmstadt: Celebrating Drupal 8's Most Important Release Yet

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 10/04/2018 - 16:52

Though there was no DrupalCon Europe this year, the European Drupal community stepped up and organized their own conference, Drupal Europe, in Darmstadt, Germany last month. An incredibly successful gathering held in the Darmstadtium venue, a beautiful convention center in the center of this college town, Drupal Europe demonstrated the unique power that grassroots initiatives can have in our open-source community.

Tags: acquia drupal planet

blog.studio.gd: Drupal 8 Views Plugins (Part 2) : The display extender plugin

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 10/04/2018 - 15:14
Let's see how and why to use a views display extender plugin.

blog.studio.gd: Drupal 8 Views Plugins (Part 2) : The display extender plugin

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 10/04/2018 - 15:14
Let's see how and why to use a views display extender plugin.

blog.studio.gd: Views Plugins (Part 1) : Simple area handler plugin

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 10/04/2018 - 15:14
In this series I will show you how to make use of the new Drupal 8 Plugin system, we begin with a simple example : the views area handler plugins.

blog.studio.gd: Views Plugins (Part 1) : Simple area handler plugin

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 10/04/2018 - 15:14
In this series I will show you how to make use of the new Drupal 8 Plugin system, we begin with a simple example : the views area handler plugins.

blog.studio.gd: Views Plugins (Part 1) : Simple area handler plugin

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 10/04/2018 - 15:14
In this series I will show you how to make use of the new Drupal 8 Plugin system, we begin with a simple example : the views area handler plugins.

blog.studio.gd: Overview of CMI in Drupal 8

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 10/04/2018 - 15:14
Some notes about the new Configuration management system in Drupal 8

blog.studio.gd: Overview of CMI in Drupal 8

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 10/04/2018 - 15:14
Some notes about the new Configuration management system in Drupal 8

blog.studio.gd: Overview of CMI in Drupal 8

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 10/04/2018 - 15:14
Some notes about the new Configuration management system in Drupal 8

blog.studio.gd: Migrate to Drupal 8 from a custom site

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 10/04/2018 - 15:14
Migrate is now included in the Drupal core for making the upgrade path from 6.x and 7.x versions to Drupal 8.

In this article will see how to use the Drupal migration framework to migrate custom sites to drupal 8.

blog.studio.gd: Migrate to Drupal 8 from a custom site

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 10/04/2018 - 15:14
Migrate is now included in the Drupal core for making the upgrade path from 6.x and 7.x versions to Drupal 8.

In this article will see how to use the Drupal migration framework to migrate custom sites to drupal 8.

blog.studio.gd: Migrate to Drupal 8 from a custom site

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 10/04/2018 - 15:14
Migrate is now included in the Drupal core for making the upgrade path from 6.x and 7.x versions to Drupal 8.

In this article will see how to use the Drupal migration framework to migrate custom sites to drupal 8.

blog.studio.gd: Inline Entity Display

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 10/04/2018 - 15:14
Handle referenced entity fields directly in the parent entity

blog.studio.gd: Inline Entity Display

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 10/04/2018 - 15:14
Handle referenced entity fields directly in the parent entity

blog.studio.gd: Inline Entity Display

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 10/04/2018 - 15:14
Handle referenced entity fields directly in the parent entity

Mass.gov Digital Services: Why we write at a 6th grade level

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 10/04/2018 - 10:31
Variety of content and the need for empathy drive our effort to simplify language across Mass.gov

Nearly 7 million people live in Massachusetts, and millions more visit the state each year. These people come from different backgrounds and interact with the Commonwealth for various reasons.

Graphic showing more than 3 million visitors go to Mass.gov each month.

We need to write for everyone while empathizing with each individual. That’s why we write at a 6th grade reading level. Let’s dig into the reasons why.

Education isn’t the main factor

The Commonwealth has a high literacy rate and a world-renowned education network. From elementary school to college and beyond, you can get a great education here.

We’re proud of our education environment, but it doesn’t affect our readability standards. Navigating the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Nutrition Program might be challenging for everyone.

Complexity demands simplicity

People searching for nutrition services are doing so out of necessity. They’re probably frustrated, worried, and scared. That affects how people read and retain information.

Learn about our content strategy. Read the 2017 content team review.

This is the case for many other scenarios. Government services can be complicated to navigate. Our job is to simplify language. We get rid of the white noise and focus on essential details.

Time is not on our side

You don’t browse Mass.gov in your free time. It’s a resource you use when you have to. Think of it as a speedboat, not a cruise ship. They’ll both get you across the water, just at different speeds.

Graphic showing desktop visitors to Mass.gov look at more pages and have longer sessions than mobile and tablet visitors.

Mass.gov visitors on mobile devices spend less time on the site and read fewer pages. The 44% share of mobile and tablet traffic will only increase over time. These visitors need information boiled down to essential details. Simplifying language is key here.

Exception to the rule

A 6th-grade reading level doesn’t work all the time. We noticed this when we conducted power-user testing. Lawyers, accountants, and other groups who frequently use Mass.gov were involved in the tests.

These groups want jargon and industry language. It taught us that readability is relative.

Where we are today

We use the Flesch-Kincaid model to determine reading level in our dashboards. It accounts for factors like sentence length and the number of syllables in words.

This is a good foundation to ensure we consistently hit the mark. However, time is the most important tool we have. The more content we write, the better we’ll get.

Writing is a skill refined over time, and adjusting writing styles isn’t simple. Even so, we’re making progress. In fact, this post is written at a 6th grade reading level.

Interested in a career in civic tech? Find job openings at Digital Services.

Follow us on Twitter | Collaborate with us on GitHub | Visit our site

Why we write at a 6th grade level was originally published in MA Digital Services on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Mass.gov Digital Services: Why we write at a 6th grade level

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 10/04/2018 - 10:31
Variety of content and the need for empathy drive our effort to simplify language across Mass.gov

Nearly 7 million people live in Massachusetts, and millions more visit the state each year. These people come from different backgrounds and interact with the Commonwealth for various reasons.

Graphic showing more than 3 million visitors go to Mass.gov each month.

We need to write for everyone while empathizing with each individual. That’s why we write at a 6th grade reading level. Let’s dig into the reasons why.

Education isn’t the main factor

The Commonwealth has a high literacy rate and a world-renowned education network. From elementary school to college and beyond, you can get a great education here.

We’re proud of our education environment, but it doesn’t affect our readability standards. Navigating the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Nutrition Program might be challenging for everyone.

Complexity demands simplicity

People searching for nutrition services are doing so out of necessity. They’re probably frustrated, worried, and scared. That affects how people read and retain information.

Learn about our content strategy. Read the 2017 content team review.

This is the case for many other scenarios. Government services can be complicated to navigate. Our job is to simplify language. We get rid of the white noise and focus on essential details.

Time is not on our side

You don’t browse Mass.gov in your free time. It’s a resource you use when you have to. Think of it as a speedboat, not a cruise ship. They’ll both get you across the water, just at different speeds.

Graphic showing desktop visitors to Mass.gov look at more pages and have longer sessions than mobile and tablet visitors.

Mass.gov visitors on mobile devices spend less time on the site and read fewer pages. The 44% share of mobile and tablet traffic will only increase over time. These visitors need information boiled down to essential details. Simplifying language is key here.

Exception to the rule

A 6th-grade reading level doesn’t work all the time. We noticed this when we conducted power-user testing. Lawyers, accountants, and other groups who frequently use Mass.gov were involved in the tests.

These groups want jargon and industry language. It taught us that readability is relative.

Where we are today

We use the Flesch-Kincaid model to determine reading level in our dashboards. It accounts for factors like sentence length and the number of syllables in words.

This is a good foundation to ensure we consistently hit the mark. However, time is the most important tool we have. The more content we write, the better we’ll get.

Writing is a skill refined over time, and adjusting writing styles isn’t simple. Even so, we’re making progress. In fact, this post is written at a 6th grade reading level.

Interested in a career in civic tech? Find job openings at Digital Services.

Follow us on Twitter | Collaborate with us on GitHub | Visit our site

Why we write at a 6th grade level was originally published in MA Digital Services on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

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