Drupal News

ImageX: In-person events are back! Reflecting on DrupalCon Portland

Main Drupal Feed - Tue, 05/10/2022 - 22:31
“It's great to be back together with so many familiar faces and individuals who are so passionate about Drupal. It’s a one-of-a-kind community that lets us have a chance to be a part of something bigger than ourselves." — Glenn Hilton, CEO & Founder

ImageX: How to Set Up Drupal Site Breadcrumbs

Main Drupal Feed - Tue, 05/10/2022 - 22:08
Once upon a time, there lived a website that wanted to perform better. It wished it was easier to navigate, more user-friendly for visitors to find what they were looking for, and, ultimately, more engaging for customers to hit the “Order” button. Just as in all decent fairy tales, all these wishes were granted! All these wishes (and more) can be fulfilled with the help of a navigation element known as “breadcrumbs”. And this element owes its name to the Brothers Grimm folk tale, Hansel & Gretal, about the siblings who used breadcrumbs to find their way home through the dark woods.

Consensus Enterprises: TUF for Humans: Explaining software update security

Main Drupal Feed - Tue, 05/10/2022 - 13:00
Wherein we try to explain The Update Framework (TUF) so that ordinary humans can understand it.

Community Working Group posts: 2022 Aaron Winborn Award Winner: Angie Byron

Main Drupal Feed - Tue, 05/10/2022 - 06:38

During DrupalCon Portland 2022, the members of the Drupal Community Working Group were pleased to announce the winner of the 2022 Aaron Winborn Award, Angie Byron (webchick).  

About Webchick

Angie joined the Drupal community in 2005 as a Google Summer of Code student, brand new to Drupal, having previously learned about it by “viewing source” on the SpreadFirefox website. Early on, she made her mark on the community by figuring out how to accomplish tasks and documenting them on Drupal.org. (Her proudest documentation achievement is authoring the original Form API Reference.) Her relentless pursuit of knowledge and dedication to sharing that knowledge in this way led to an outpouring of admiration by others in the community since the beginning  of her Drupal career.

As she became more and more comfortable with Drupal and our community, her contributions continued to grow. She has been an unstoppable advocate for making Drupal a welcoming community for all; almost 250 community members list her as a mentor. 

Angie became a Drupal core committer in 2008 and has thousands of code contribution credits, over 500 documentation edits, and has contributed to the Drupal community in countless additional ways including being one of the founding members of the Community Working Group, a Security Team member, a Drupal.org site and content moderator, a Drupal Association Board member, and has spoken at many Drupal events around the world.

Angie started working for Lullabot in 2006 as a Senior Web Architect. In 2011, she joined Acquia as Director of Community Development, tasked with leading and participating in major community initiatives including the Great Git Migration, Drupal 7, 8, and 9 development, in addition to always being a strong advocate for improving the Drupal authoring process. 

Many Nominations

This year, there were 29 individuals nominated for the award. In the coming weeks, the CWG will be contacting all nominees to let them know of their nomination, sharing some details about what their nominators wrote about them, and thank them for their continued work in the community.

Multiple people nominated Angie for the 2022 Aaron Winborn Award. Here are a few of the things they said:

I don’t think there is anyone on the planet who has done more for Drupal and the community than Angie Byron. She has not only demonstrated all the values of this award, she embodies them.

I can't think of anyone better to receive the Aaron Winborn Award this year than Angie. She is without a doubt one of our greatest community members for her constant above-and-beyond commitment to the project and the community … She has always put the project and community first and made sure that people get involved and integrated at all levels. We are lucky to have her in our community.

In addition to the physical award given to Angie, she was also provided with a free ticket to DrupalCon Portland as well as travel expenses. The physical award was hand-crafted by Drupal community member Caroline Achee (cachee).  

About the Aaron Winborn Award

The award is named after a long-time Drupal contributor who lost his battle with ALS in 2015. This award recognizes an individual who, like Aaron, demonstrates personal integrity, kindness, and an above-and-beyond commitment to the Drupal project and community.

Previous winners of the award are Cathy Theys, Gabór Hojtsy, Nikki Stevens, Kevin Thull, Leslie Glynn, Baddý Breidert, and AmyJune Hineline. Current CWG members, along with previous winners, selected the winner based on nominations submitted by Drupal community members.

Nominations for the 2023 award will open in early 2023.
 

Community Working Group posts: 2022 Aaron Winborn Award Winner: Angie Byron

Main Drupal Feed - Tue, 05/10/2022 - 06:38

During DrupalCon Portland 2022, the members of the Drupal Community Working Group were pleased to announce the winner of the 2022 Aaron Winborn Award, Angie Byron (webchick).  

About Webchick

Angie joined the Drupal community in 2005 as a Google Summer of Code student, brand new to Drupal, having previously learned about it by “viewing source” on the SpreadFirefox website. Early on, she made her mark on the community by figuring out how to accomplish tasks and documenting them on Drupal.org. (Her proudest documentation achievement is authoring the original Form API Reference.) Her relentless pursuit of knowledge and dedication to sharing that knowledge in this way led to an outpouring of admiration by others in the community since the beginning  of her Drupal career.

As she became more and more comfortable with Drupal and our community, her contributions continued to grow. She has been an unstoppable advocate for making Drupal a welcoming community for all; almost 250 community members list her as a mentor. 

Angie became a Drupal core committer in 2008 and has thousands of code contribution credits, over 500 documentation edits, and has contributed to the Drupal community in countless additional ways including being one of the founding members of the Community Working Group, a Security Team member, a Drupal.org site and content moderator, a Drupal Association Board member, and has spoken at many Drupal events around the world.

Angie started working for Lullabot in 2006 as a Senior Web Architect. In 2011, she joined Acquia as Director of Community Development, tasked with leading and participating in major community initiatives including the Great Git Migration, Drupal 7, 8, and 9 development, in addition to always being a strong advocate for improving the Drupal authoring process. 

Many Nominations

This year, there were 29 individuals nominated for the award. In the coming weeks, the CWG will be contacting all nominees to let them know of their nomination, sharing some details about what their nominators wrote about them, and thank them for their continued work in the community.

Multiple people nominated Angie for the 2022 Aaron Winborn Award. Here are a few of the things they said:

I don’t think there is anyone on the planet who has done more for Drupal and the community than Angie Byron. She has not only demonstrated all the values of this award, she embodies them.

I can't think of anyone better to receive the Aaron Winborn Award this year than Angie. She is without a doubt one of our greatest community members for her constant above-and-beyond commitment to the project and the community … She has always put the project and community first and made sure that people get involved and integrated at all levels. We are lucky to have her in our community.

In addition to the physical award given to Angie, she was also provided with a free ticket to DrupalCon Portland as well as travel expenses. The physical award was hand-crafted by Drupal community member Caroline Achee (cachee).  

About the Aaron Winborn Award

The award is named after a long-time Drupal contributor who lost his battle with ALS in 2015. This award recognizes an individual who, like Aaron, demonstrates personal integrity, kindness, and an above-and-beyond commitment to the Drupal project and community.

Previous winners of the award are Cathy Theys, Gabór Hojtsy, Nikki Stevens, Kevin Thull, Leslie Glynn, Baddý Breidert, and AmyJune Hineline. Current CWG members, along with previous winners, selected the winner based on nominations submitted by Drupal community members.

Nominations for the 2023 award will open in early 2023.
 

Drupal Association blog: Changes to Drupal Association Member Management

Main Drupal Feed - Mon, 05/09/2022 - 23:44

In the coming weeks, you will see changes to how the Drupal Association processes and manages individual memberships and donations.

We decided to make a change to a new payment processing platform called Classy that integrates well with Salesforce, which will help us have a better engagement long term with our members. In addition, Classy provides a more user-friendly “back-end” management interface that will enable less technical staff to run new campaigns and provide member support without requiring valuable engineering team hours that otherwise support Drupal.org infrastructure and project initiatives.

While we are undergoing this transition, you may see some delays in your member badge appearing on Drupal.org for those with a Drupal.org profile. You will also need to use the new Classy portal to manage your recurring membership. Your recurring membership should be migrated into the new portal no later than May 20th. Of course, we’ll provide easy links to manage profiles on our membership landing page.

One of the features we like about Classy is that it enables us to accept payments in 130 currencies and will also default to the currency identified in your browser settings.  We hope that this will provide a more inclusive experience for our global members.

The transition will be seamless for most of our members, but for those currently paying via PayPal wallet we will contact you to help transition to the new system.

Not yet a member? We'd love your support.

Join today

CivicTheme

Drupal Themes - Mon, 05/09/2022 - 05:01

Placeholder for CivicTheme Drupal theme

Code will be published soon

Third & Grove: DrupalCon Portland 2022 Recap

Main Drupal Feed - Sun, 05/08/2022 - 08:40

And that’s a wrap on DrupalCon!

The first IRL DrupalCon since the start of the pandemic was a busy blast of seeing old friends and colleagues, making new friends along the way, talking to prospects, and being around all things Drupal
 

Cocomore: Empowerment comes from opportunity. Meet Cocomore's new Fair Trade talent training program

Main Drupal Feed - Fri, 05/06/2022 - 13:49

Empowerment comes from opportunity. Meet Cocomore's new Fair Trade talent training program

sandra.bloem Fri, 05/06/2022 - 15:49 The Metaverse - the next big trip or 
the next big trap?

Lemberg Solutions: 5 Best Sessions at DrupalCon Portland 2022

Main Drupal Feed - Fri, 05/06/2022 - 12:00
On April 25–28, 1,300 Drupalists came together in Portland, Oregon for the first in-person DrupalCon in more than two years. Even though this is just half of the event’s usual attendance (covid is still to blame), we were beyond excited to finally see our friends and partners in person. Nothing beats hanging out face to face. The pandemic may have caused the event’s usual crowd to shrink, but the number of sponsors remained about the same, which means that Drupal agencies were as ready as ever to continue supporting the Drupal community.

PreviousNext: Goodbye Internet Explorer

Main Drupal Feed - Fri, 05/06/2022 - 05:55

It is Internet Explorer's retirement next month (June 15th), and it’s well and truly time for you to stop supporting it on your website for any current and future development (you have already, I hope). 

This also presents an opportunity to pull out any code solely because of Internet Explorer and start living in the modern (browser) world.

by rikki.bochow / 6 May 2022

That first part is easy. Sure, it’s pretty safe with a month before the browser will officially stop working to let new development get launched without being tested in IE11. Your developers will thank you.

That second part, ripping it entirely out of your existing code base, may need some convincing. After all, it’s already there. What harm can it possibly do?

This goes beyond Internet Explorer too. I’m talking about ALL old browsers, rarely used browsers and older versions of modern browsers. Check your analytics to get an idea of how many people are visiting your website this way, then think about offering them a simpler version of your website.

Let’s start with what it might look like.

Have you ever turned on “Reader Mode”? I love Reader Mode, and sometimes I just want to read, you know? A simpler version of your website is just that - a basic layout and no Javascript.

You’ll get a pretty good sense of your HTML structure and source order this way, too (and if you find this needs correcting, please do, as good accessibility starts here).

But what’s the harm?

It sounds like a bit of work, so let’s discuss why it’s worth doing.

Performance

A grid that works in IE11 will have a lot more code than you need for a modern browser. I’m talking anything from negative margins, padding, row divs, :nth-child selectors, and possibly various mixins and extends. Compared to a modern CSS Grid grid, the size of this CSS (and probably HTML) is significant.

Javascript that works in IE11 is also huge compared to what we can achieve in modern browsers. jQuery is no longer needed, a lot of your polyfills won't be needed, and modern browsers support module loading. Say goodbye to that mega JS bundle loaded on every page even though 60% of it is written for one interactive app on one page… that isn’t even published anymore.

Assuming that IE11 is as far back as you have, an older codebase probably goes back to IE10 or worse.

And if you have put a lot of work in already to start writing modern code (go you!), and use something like Babel, code splitting, module/nomodule attributes or PostCSS, autoprefixer and custom property fallback. Think about how much faster your code will compile without all that legacy stuff? I promise it’s a lot.

Maintenance

Remember that complex IE11 grid with negative margins, padding, the works? All those different lines of CSS to maintain so many weak points. Does the new frontend developer you just hired need to spend an afternoon getting their head around it? What does this do? Why’s it here? What’s a spacer gif? (Just kidding, but yes, I’m that old).

There is a technical debt attached to any piece of code that isn’t currently used. That shiny new feature that you all agree does NOT need to work in IE11 doesn’t even work correctly in modern browsers because of that random piece of legacy code that’s creating some obscure bug that takes days to find and resolve. Ouch.

Appealingness

You like us, frontend developers, yes? You possibly need us from time to time, and you might need to hire more of us. We can be happy, we can make jokes, and we can be your friends.

Frontend developers get a constant stream of new shiny frontend code and tools. We enjoy this part of our jobs the most, and we seek employers who can offer it to us. Tracking down and fixing browser bugs is not so appealing. 

Where do you even start?

So you’re convinced, hooray! Depending on what you have to work with, this could be a pretty big task. But a practical first step is just to analyse what you have and break it down into steps and phases.

Maybe start with that grid system. Converting into a Flex based grid with a gap property would be a good start, then perhaps plan a CSS Grid and markup clean up for phase 2. Wrapping it all in @supports(display:grid) will mean older browsers fall back to the default stacking context. Also consider setting up some visual regression testing before you start.

For your Javascript, stick a type=module attribute on your script tags for the same effect. If you’re building a nomodule version, just stop. Review any polyfills you're loading. Then take one Javascript file at a time and start converting it to ES6 modules, removing jQuery while you go (of course you have test coverage in-case you break something).

Are you using Browserslist to target the browsers that need transpiling to? Update it to what you deem appropriate based on your analytics.

After each significant change:

  1. Take a look at the damage and make sure your content is still accessible.
  2. Maybe put a couple of messages in if the content makes no sense without the app or widget that it relates to.
  3. Treat it like the app failed to load for some reason.

If you find something that has nothing to do with IE and isn’t used on the site anymore? Remove it!

Feel like it’s time for a design refresh? Do it at the same time! Think of this as an opportunity, not a chore.

And don’t forget to run performance checks as you go to get that lovely warm feeling of improvement.

So go forth, live in the modern (browser) world.

Tagged Internet Explorer

Factorial.io: Nachhaltige Webentwicklung im Backend

Main Drupal Feed - Fri, 05/06/2022 - 00:00

Wer heute eine Webpräsenz betreibt, sollte sich Gedanken darüber machen, wie wir diese grüner betreiben können. Doch welche Maßnahmen gibt es im Backend?

Factorial.io: Nachhaltige Webentwicklung

Main Drupal Feed - Fri, 05/06/2022 - 00:00

Der Klimawandel ist real! Angesichts immer stärker spürbarer Klimaveränderungen müssen wir tun, was nötig ist, um die drohende Katastrophe abzumildern. Wir als Entwickler*innen haben hierbei einen Teil beizutragen. 

Chapter Three: Hell is Programming a Calendar (Part 1)

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 05/05/2022 - 22:16
A project team is managing a site for people to see events in their local community. The client asks the team to make a (seemingly) pretty simple feature; they want logged-in users to be able to make their own events. The site already lets admins do this, so it shouldn’t be too bad. The team agrees it should take about two days of dev work, assign it, and move on. Cut to two weeks later but the work still isn’t done. The client is getting impatient, the project manager is burning good will, and the dev is in a corner still working on the feature and muttering to themselves about time zones and unix. 

Gábor Hojtsy: The epic story of the last week of how Drupal's frontend and backend look changed after 11 years at DrupalCon Portland

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 05/05/2022 - 10:28

Last week was DrupalCon Portland, our first in-person big DrupalCon back together with 1300+ attendees. I was fortunately one of the attendees along with leaders of in-the works Drupal admin theme Claro and frontend theme Olivero. Both Claro and Olivero have been in the works for years, and both were quite close to get done, yet we did not even dream of getting both be the new defaults in Drupal within the week. But we did it!

Claro replaces Seven as the default administration theme and Olivero relaces Bartik as the default frontend theme in both Drupal 9.4.0 and Drupal 10.0.0. Both priror themes have been the Drupal defaults for 11 years, ever since Drupal 7 was released. Both themes received a lot of key contributions throughout the years, so many to even attempt to recount here. This is a guest post by Lauri Eskola (with additions by myself) on the story of how the final week went. Read on to peek into how we worked at DrupalCon to makes these historic changes happen.

Claro became stable and the default administration theme

#Drupal Admin UI / Claro BoF at @drupalcon #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/49lMTqCj4c

— Mike Herchel (@mikeherchel) April 25, 2022

First Cristina Chumillas (ckrina) organized a BoF discussion about Claro on Monday morning. We promoted the BoF on social media and on the contribution page on the DrupalCon site.

The focus of the BoF was to discuss the remaining scope for getting Claro stable and default in the Standard profile and if there is anything in the scope that could be reduced. We were able to descope a few issues from the roadmap, which got a sign-off from Gábor Hojtsy later that day as a product manager onsite. We also created a battle plan for the remaining issues to make sure that everyone involved knew what needs to happen and who should take action on each of the issues.

After the BoF, we met Matthew Grasmick during lunch, and he half jokingly suggested that we should try to finish the roadmap by Dries’ keynote on Wednesday so that he could announce the good news there. This inspired the team to do the unthinkable; to try to finish the remaining part of the roadmap by Wednesday morning.

On Monday Lauri Eskola worked on the roadmap with Cristina, Emilie Nouveau, Mike Herchel and Kat Shaw. We also received support from Angie Byron and Gábor on making sure that we are on the right track with the solution for the last stable blocking issue that required code changes.

Hace you heard? Just one more a11y META issue to go and we can mark Claro as stable!! #DrupalCon @laurii1 go go! pic.twitter.com/gRIEYT8PBL

— Cristina (@chumillas) April 27, 2022

Gábor also did the vast majority of the actual code patches required for marking Claro stable and the default theme.

We were able to land the last stable blocking issue on Tuesday morning. Now all that was left was finishing up on the accessibility assessments. Some of the assessments were done and could be closed, but forced colors mode and focus visibility still needed some more assessment.

We received help from Ben Mullins who was offsite, and in the meanwhile Lauri was able to collaborate with Cristina, Emilie, Mike, Kat, Adam Bergstein, Baddý Breidert, and Ted Bowman onsite at the event.

All of the assessments were done by the evening. This was after we had already left the venue. Angie, Cristina, Lauri and Gábor headed for dinner and Lauri was still trying to file follow-up issues for the problems discovered as part of the assessment from Angie’s car, but he found that Ben already submitted them.

Once we got to the restaurant, all of the issues had been closed and all that was left was for someone to commit the patch that marked Claro stable.

Angie was one of the people who were involved in starting the whole project, so she was the perfect person to commit the issue.

Wohoooooo congratulations to the team working to get Claro stable and default! @chumillas @laurii1 @webchick Thank you for all your hard work!! That picture is sooo cute #DrupalCon #DrupalConPortland pic.twitter.com/cuBISEyh9m

— Fatima (@sugaroverflow) April 27, 2022

We requeued the issue to mark Claro the default theme in Standard for testing with Claro being stable and went on with our dinner. It was great vegan food by the way, we suggest you check out Blossoming Lotus if you are in Portland.

Afterwards we moved to Gábor’s hotel lobby and Angie committed the Standard profile patch too.

In the meantime, Benji Fischer, who was at the conference but not with us in person noticed that Claro became stable and restarted work on making it the administration theme of the Umami demo profile as well. Since we were at it already, Cristina reviewed and tested this patch and she committed that from the hotel lobby as well.

Twelve hours later, Dries announced the huge milestone at the Driesnote with a photo of Angie's commit from the hotel. Years of work suddenly becoming real in a couple days!

Olivero became the default frontend theme

We are getting closer to make #Olivero default in #Drupal. @gaborhojtsy @laurii1 @mikeherchel are preparing it now at #DrupalConPortland #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/aX5V6iTOmw

— Baddy Sonja Breidert (@baddysonja) April 28, 2022

Inspired by the success of Claro, people started working on the remaining blockers to make Olivero the default theme after the Driesnote. Olivero was already stable, and all that was left was to do quality assurance checks, which was done by Mike Herchel, and to get tests to pass with Olivero being the default theme.

Getting all of the tests to pass with Olivero being the default theme in Standard profile was much more complex than we had anticipated. This had been worked on for months before the event through various spin-off issues by several contributors, but numerous details remained to solve.

The work was finished during the event by Joe Schindelar onsite with the help of Spokje, Lee Rowlands and Amber Himes Matz offsite.

We got sign-offs by Thursday morning from Nathaniel Catchpole (release manager) offsite and Gábor (product manager) onsite that Olivero could also be made the default theme of Standard.

We got all of the work done by Thursday afternoon, which raised an idea that we could commit the patch live at the beginning of trivia night. We were anxiously working on this up until the last minute, because DrupalCI was having a very rough day with most test runs across various issues running into random failures.

We were literally watching multiple DrupalCI runs live at the event so that we could start researching any test failures as soon as they appeared.

The final push to make Olivero the new default Drupal 9/10 theme landed in a live commit at @DrupalConNA trivia night! Joined on zoom were @shadow4611 @jponch @putrabon @andy__blum, while the crowd cheered on! Thanks @lullabot and all the contributors. #ContributeAtDrupalCon pic.twitter.com/Be3ACCeSnP

— Gábor Hojtsy (@gaborhojtsy) April 29, 2022

Final fixes were put in place by Joe Schindelar in the afternoon. Luckily we managed to get green test runs and had a successful live commit at the beginning of trivia to 9.4.x.

Mike got on stage to explain what is going on and offsite Olivero team members Jen Witkowski, Putra Bonaccorsi, Jared Ponchot and Andy Blum all called in via a Zoom meeting. The 10.x clean test result came back a bit later, but we merged to 10.x as well before trivia started.

This was extremely rewarding and a perfect way to end this very successful event! It felt like a full circle as Olivero got started as an idea at the last in-person DrupalCon and got to land at this in-person DrupalCon.

While getting these two themes be the new Drupal defaults was a highlight for us, this DrupalCon was notable for many other reasons. It was great to see our friends again after several years only on video calls. Want to be in the next epic story moving the drop? DrupalCon Europe is coming back to Prague in September, ticket sales are about to start. We plan to be there as well working on the next major things for Drupal!

Dries Buytaert: Drupal is for ambitious site builders

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 05/04/2022 - 18:29

With Drupal 10 around the corner, it's time to start laying out Drupal 11's development roadmap.

It's important we begin that work by reflecting on Drupal's purpose. Drupal's purpose has evolved over the years. In the past, the goal might have been to build the world's most powerful CMS. Today, I believe Drupal has become much bigger than a CMS alone.

Drupal enables everyone to participate in an Open Web. The web is one of the most important public resources. As a result, the Drupal community's shared purpose is to make that resource open, safe, and accessible to all. With 1 in 30 websites running on Drupal, we have a lot of influence on building the future of the web we want to see. In fact, we have an opportunity to help build a digital future that is better than the one we have today.

To align with that purpose, and to drive the most impact, our vision also has to evolve. Five years ago, I declared that Drupal is for ambitious digital experiences. I'd argue that we have achieved that vision by investing in headless Drupal, Media, Layout Builder, and additional features that help enable the creation of ambitious digital experiences.

That is why I propose evolving our vision statement to "Drupal is for ambitious site builders".

Attracting more Drupal site builders will increase Drupal's potential user base, and in turn create a more open, accessible and inclusive web for all.

This shift also brings us back to our roots, which I've talked about in several of my previous DrupalCon keynotes.

What is an ambitious site builder?

An ambitious site builder sits in between the developer hand-coding everything using a framework, and the content author using a SaaS solution. There is a gap between developers and content authors that Drupal fills really well.

An ambitious site builder can get a lot of things done by installing and configuring modules, and using Drupal through the UI. But when needed, they can use custom code to make their site exactly how they want it to be. Ambitious site builders are the reason why Drupal became so successful in the first place.

I'm excited to see this vision come to life through the key initiatives for Drupal 11, which I'll talk about in my next blog post.

Handicraft Zymphonies Theme

Drupal Themes - Wed, 05/04/2022 - 16:14

Handicraft zymphonies theme has a new look of soft and clean professionalism for the Handicraft Business. These designs combine creativity with simplicity on each page. Read more

Live Demo Advanced Themes

Features
  • Drupal 8/9 core
  • Bootstrap v4
  • Handicraft theme
  • Mobile-first theme
  • Easy customization
  • Great performance
  • Standard typography
  • Built with HTML5 and CSS3
  • Dynamic layouts
    • 2 column layout
    • 3 column layout
    • 4 column layout
Most installed Zymphonies theme Contact Zymphonies

Have Queries? Click here to contact Zymphonies

  • Free theme customisation & additional features
  • Drupal custom theme development
  • Drupal website design & development
  • Drupal website migration

Sponsored by Zymphonies

Web Wash: Generate Sitemaps using Simple XML Sitemap in Drupal

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 05/04/2022 - 10:53

The Simple XML Sitemap automatically generates a XML sitemap for your Drupal website whilst adhering to Google’s latest recommendations and guidelines. There are various customizations that this module allows, all of which are listed in more detail on the module’s page.

This tutorial will show you how to install this module and configure it on content types, links, menus and view pages.

The Drop Times: “Where Inclusion Is No Exception but the Norm,” into That Heaven of Freedom, St. IGNUcius, Let My Community Awake!

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 05/04/2022 - 10:20
Demetrius Cheatham, the Senior Director of Diversity and Inclusion Strategy at GitHub, talked about how people are left out and what we can do to ensure our community is more inclusive.

Pages