Wordpress News

WPTavern: Open Source Initiative Launches News Blog on WordPress

Wordpress Planet - Mon, 05/23/2022 - 21:31

The Open Source Initiative (OSI), a public benefit corporation and steward of the Open Source Definition, has launched a news blog on WordPress. In 2021, OSI’s board appointed Stefano Maffulli as its first Executive Director, and he is leading the organization in overhauling its web presence.

“One of the main objectives for OSI in 2022 is to reinforce our communication channels,” Maffulli said. “We’re improving the perception of OSI as a reliable, trustworthy organization. The OSI didn’t have a regular publishing schedule before, nor a content plan. Now we have established a regular cadence, publishing at least once a week (often more), commenting on recent news like a winning against a patent troll or court decisions about open source licenses, featuring our sponsors, and offering opinions on topics of interest for the wider community. It’s a starting point to affirm OSI as a convener of conversations among various souls of the open source communities.”

The blog was launched on a subdomain of the opensource.org website, which uses Drupal 7, self-hosted on a droplet from Digital Ocean. It’s also tightly integrated with CiviCRM to manage members’ subscriptions, donations from individuals, tracking sponsorships, and sending the newsletter.

As Drupal 7 is approaching EOL in November 2022, the team is planning to move everything to WordPress. They explored managed hosting with Drupal but found it was more expensive and also required them to migrate to a more recent version of Drupal. Themes and plugins made for D7 are not compatible with D9+, so they didn’t see an advantage in terms of time or simplicity.

“Unfortunately we don’t have staff to manage a self-hosted Drupal installation and nobody on staff really knows how to use it,” Maffulli said. “Tasks like creating landing pages proved to be quite time consuming for us.

“With money, knowledge and time constraints and an urgent need to increase our publishing rate, ramping up the organization’s visibility online we decided to migrate the website in two phases: First, we migrate the blog so we have a fresh look together with the improved publishing schedule. This phase is complete – the blog is on a managed hosting offered by DreamHost. The second phase is the migration of the rest of the site: this is ongoing with the help of Automattic and will take a few months to complete.”

Although Maffulli wanted to avoid creating a blog under a subdomain, and preferred using the old URL (opensource.org/blog...), mixing Drupal self-hosted with a managed WordPress site was not a common use case with straightforward solutions. If the new blog design looks familiar, that’s because it was inspired by WP Tavern’s new design.

Open Source Initiative’s new WordPress-powered blog

“Once we decided to go with a subdomain, the new site took really only a few days to launch: I knew I wanted to have a simple site, minimal amount of plugins, no page builders and a very clean design based on WP Tavern, of which I’m a fan,” he said.

Since the Tavern’s theme wasn’t yet on GitHub, Maffulli contracted a developer who used WordPress’ new full-site editing features to create a simple child theme based on the Twenty Twenty-Two default theme. He said he is glad overseeing the project gave him a chance to learn the basics of FSE.

Some members of the OSI staff were already familiar with WordPress, which contributed to the decision to use the software. The wide range of functionality and third-party integrations were also a factor.

“We rely a lot on content calendar solutions that allow to manage schedule posts and social media promotions from one tool,” Maffulli said.

“We’re addicted to CoSchedule. That tool is far from perfect, primarily because it’s not Open Source. But it’s so incredibly powerful and convenient for a small team like us. We track our publishing calendar and tasks with CoSchedule, making it so easy not to miss a beat: every blog post has it’s social media attachment, same with the newsletter, that becomes a blog post for archive. Soon, we’ll add podcasts.”

Maffulli said he wishes the WordPress media library offered a more standardized way of storing and tracking copyright information, like the author, source, and license.

“I think this unnecessarily exposes WP users to copyright infringement claims where trolls could threaten successfully people who may have not kept their records clean,” he said. “It’s something to think about for future releases of Instant Images and similar plugins.”

The OSI team has opted to keep comments closed on posts at this time, since they do not have the capicity to properly moderate comments.

“I have a lot of experience managing online communities and I know it can become very time consuming,” Maffulli said. “We just don’t have staff but we’re raising funds to solve that.”

OSI is also looking into creating a way to give its members the privilege of commenting. This would require a way to integrate authentication with CiviCRM to access members’ records.

“While we build staff and upgrade opensource.org, I hope to setup services from the IndieWeb community into Voices of Open Source,” Maffulli said. “This will allow for comments made on various social networks to be aggregated back into blog.opensource.org.”

The new Voices of Open Source blog has started by featuring the network of OSI affiliates, which boasts 80 organizations, including Mozilla, Wikimedia, Linux Foundation, OpenUK, and more.

“We’d like to share OSI’s unique position to highlight open source stories, challenges, and successes of companies and people around the world,” Maffulli said. OSI is in communication with its affiliates to make them aware of this opportunity and is aiming to open guest posting on the blog to indvidual members in the wider community sometime in the future.

Post Status: WooCommerce Function of the Week: wc_get_product_category_list

Wordpress Planet - Sun, 05/22/2022 - 21:00

Here's yet another time-saving WooCommerce function. No need to reinvent the wheel — with a single line of code and no custom queries, you can get all the categories a product belongs to.

This week's function is wc_get_product_category_list, and there's no need to explain what it does as its name is self-explanatory.

As usual, we'll study the WooCommerce core function code, see where and why it's used, and finally we'll cover a quick case study. Enjoy!

Function code

The function wc_get_product_category_list can be found under \woocommerce\includes\wc-product-functions.php:

/** * Returns the product categories in a list. * * @param int $product_id Product ID. * @param string $sep (default: ', '). * @param string $before (default: ''). * @param string $after (default: ''). * @return string */ function wc_get_product_category_list( $product_id, $sep = ', ', $before = '', $after = '' ) { return get_the_term_list( $product_id, 'product_cat', $before, $sep, $after ); }

First of all, let's look at the function parameters:

  • $product_id, which is of course the product we want to get the categories for.
  • $sep, by default a comma, which defines the list separator.
  • $before and $after, by default empty strings, which define what shows before and after the list of categories. (prefix / suffix)

Now to the function statements — actually, statement, as there is only one:

return get_the_term_list( $product_id, 'product_cat', $before, $sep, $after );

That really sounds like a WordPress function as there is no mention of “woo,” “wc,” or any other WooCommerce prefixes. Let's look it up in the WordPress developer code reference documentation. (https://developer.wordpress.org/reference/functions/get_the_term_list/)

Here we go:

function get_the_term_list( $post_id, $taxonomy, $before = '', $sep = '', $after = '' ) { $terms = get_the_terms( $post_id, $taxonomy ); if ( is_wp_error( $terms ) ) { return $terms; } if ( empty( $terms ) ) { return false; } $links = array(); foreach ( $terms as $term ) { $link = get_term_link( $term, $taxonomy ); if ( is_wp_error( $link ) ) { return $link; } $links[] = '<a href="' . esc_url( $link ) . '" rel="tag">' . $term->name . '</a>'; } /** * Filters the term links for a given taxonomy. * * The dynamic portion of the hook name, `$taxonomy`, refers * to the taxonomy slug. * * Possible hook names include: * * - `term_links-category` * - `term_links-post_tag` * - `term_links-post_format` * * @since 2.5.0 * * @param string[] $links An array of term links. */ $term_links = apply_filters( "term_links-{$taxonomy}", $links ); // phpcs:ignore WordPress.NamingConventions.ValidHookName.UseUnderscores return $before . implode( $sep, $term_links ) . $after; }

Simple enough — get_the_term_list accepts basically the same parameters we covered above, plus the $taxonomy parameter, which in our case is passed as product_cat to tell WordPress we're retrieving WooCommerce product categories.

Here's how it works:

  • get_the_terms( $post_id, $taxonomy ) gets the product ID category objects.
  • $links array gets filled with the list of categories, each with its own link.
  • return $before . implode( $sep, $term_links ) . $after gives us the content we need: “prefix + $links separated with $sep + suffix”
Function usage

Define a product ID (e.g., 57) — and that's all you need to do!

Call the function:

echo wc_get_product_category_list( 57 );

And see the magic happen:

cat1 link, cat2 link, cat3 link, ...

Of course, if you have access to the $product global, you can call the function dynamically. For example, if you want to call the function on every single product pages, you could do this:

echo wc_get_product_category_list( $product->get_id() );

Now I want to see where and when the function is called, so we give it a bit of context. With a quick search through the WooCommerce plugin, I find a single result in \woocommerce\templates\single-product\meta.php, line 34:

<?php echo wc_get_product_category_list( $product->get_id(), ', ', '<span class="posted_in">' . _n( 'Category:', 'Categories:', count( $product->get_category_ids() ), 'woocommerce' ) . ' ', '</span>' ); ?>

Which generates this output on my single product page:

Now we know wc_get_product_category_list is responsible for showing the list of categories in the single product page where it comes with a prefix (‘Category:' or ‘Categories:' based on category count) plus the default comma separator and no suffix.

Let's use wc_get_product_category_list for our custom development example now and consider a quick case study.

Case study

Where could wc_get_product_category_list come in handy? Surely, in the shop page.

By default, WooCommerce shows the list of products with image, title, price and button. There is no mention of product categories there, so let's add them ourselves.

Before:

The custom snippet:

/** * @snippet Show Categories | WooCommerce Shop * @how-to Get CustomizeWoo.com FREE * @author Rodolfo Melogli * @testedwith WooCommerce 6 * @donate $9 https://businessbloomer.com/bloomer-armada/ */ add_action( 'woocommerce_after_shop_loop_item', 'bbloomer_show_product_categories', 9 ); function bbloomer_show_product_categories() { global $product; echo wc_get_product_category_list( $product->get_id(), ' - ', '<p>In: ', ' ' . _n( 'category', 'categories', count( $product->get_category_ids() ), 'woocommerce' ) . '</p>' ); }

After:

A few notes:

  • I used the woocommerce_after_shop_loop_item hook with priority 9, which is just before priority 10 (the add-to-cart button). TLDR: I'm outputting the category list above the add to cart button.
  • I declare the global $product so that I can access the product ID.
  • I then call the wc_get_product_category_list function, with the following parameters:
    • $product->get_id() -> the product ID
    • ' - ' -> the separator
    • '<p>In: ' -> the prefix
    • ' ' . _n( 'category', 'categories', count( $product->get_category_ids() ), 'woocommerce' ) . '</p> ' -> the suffix

It's interesting how I reused this line from the single product page, as I mentioned above:

_n( 'category', 'categories', count( $product->get_category_ids() ), 'woocommerce' )

Basically, if count = 1 the first string is returned (singular “category”), while if count > 1 you get the plural “categories.” You can see the difference in the last screenshot above.

Any other use cases you have in mind? Let me know in the comments!

Better

Drupal Themes - Sun, 05/22/2022 - 09:44

This theme intended towards 'The Ambitious Site Builder'

More to come soon.

WPTavern: New Video Explores Site Building Progress From WordPress 5.0 to 6.0

Wordpress Planet - Sat, 05/21/2022 - 01:14

Do you remember what it was like to use WordPress 5.0? Three years and ten major releases have radically changed the site building experience, but it’s not always easy to see recognize when focused on some of the smaller, iterative changes that slowly add up. Anne McCarthy, WordPress product liaison at Automattic and co-release coordinator for 6.0, has created a short 13-minute video that shows the immense amount of progress contributors have made on site building features.

McCarthy takes viewers back in time to WordPress 5.0, released in December 2018, which introduced the block editor and the Twenty Nineteen default theme through the work of 400+ contributors. She demonstrates using the Customizer with the default theme. These were simpler days and it’s clear now how limited the Customizer was for implementing the most basic changes.

The video contrasts that experience with the upcoming 6.0 release, which features the work of 500+ contributors on features that didn’t exist three years ago.

McCarthy quickly demonstrates the 6.0 site editing experience, swapping out template parts, and showcasing the breadth of the customization available for images, colors, typography, controlling the posts that are displayed, style variations, and the impressive array of design tools available.

Ten major versions later, nearly every aspect of a WordPress site is customizable through the site editor. For those who have not yet made the leap into full-site editing – it’s essentially like the old Customizer but with super powers, better instant previews, and the interface is a panel on the right. At this point, I don’t think the usability is at a level where someone can just get in there and immediately know what they are doing. It takes a little bit of exploring, but it’s moving in the right direction.

Videos like this one show what is possible and just how far WordPress has come since it first introduced the block editor. It also indirectly answers Joost de Valk’s recent claims that the full-site editing project not being done yet is partially to blame for WordPress’ recent decline in market share.

While WordPress remains the uncontested market leader among CMS’s, some say this small percentage of a decline is inconsequential. Matt Mullenweg has stated in previous interviews that he views market share stats as a “trailing indicator” in the quest to create the best possible experience for users and developers. A growing market share, in that sense, is a signal of user satisfaction.

WordPress jumped into the block paradigm at the right time, just as many other apps began adopting the concept of composable blocks for creating content and designs. Full-site editing is the extension of that vision but it takes time to make it something polished and delightful to use. McCarthy’s video is a good reminder of the limitations that users previously labored under while trying to edit their sites, and the “why” behind all the effort going into FSE.

“As someone who’s currently on the WordPress 6.0 Release Team, I can attest that the project needs more contributors,” WordPress contributor Nick Diego said in response to the recent market share discussion. “The fact that FSE has taken so long is not a lack of effort. There are many contributors pouring their hearts and souls into the project. We just need more help.”

WPTavern: New Video Explores Site Building Progress From WordPress 5.0 to 6.0

Wordpress Planet - Sat, 05/21/2022 - 01:14

Do you remember what it was like to use WordPress 5.0? Three years and ten major releases have radically changed the site building experience, but it’s not always easy to see recognize when focused on some of the smaller, iterative changes that slowly add up. Anne McCarthy, WordPress product liaison at Automattic and co-release coordinator for 6.0, has created a short 13-minute video that shows the immense amount of progress contributors have made on site building features.

McCarthy takes viewers back in time to WordPress 5.0, released in December 2018, which introduced the block editor and the Twenty Nineteen default theme through the work of 400+ contributors. She demonstrates using the Customizer with the default theme. These were simpler days and it’s clear now how limited the Customizer was for implementing the most basic changes.

The video contrasts that experience with the upcoming 6.0 release, which features the work of 500+ contributors on features that didn’t exist three years ago.

McCarthy quickly demonstrates the 6.0 site editing experience, swapping out template parts, and showcasing the breadth of the customization available for images, colors, typography, controlling the posts that are displayed, style variations, and the impressive array of design tools available.

Ten major versions later, nearly every aspect of a WordPress site is customizable through the site editor. For those who have not yet made the leap into full-site editing – it’s essentially like the old Customizer but with super powers, better instant previews, and the interface is a panel on the right. At this point, I don’t think the usability is at a level where someone can just get in there and immediately know what they are doing. It takes a little bit of exploring, but it’s moving in the right direction.

Videos like this one show what is possible and just how far WordPress has come since it first introduced the block editor. It also indirectly answers Joost de Valk’s recent claims that the full-site editing project not being done yet is partially to blame for WordPress’ recent decline in market share.

While WordPress remains the uncontested market leader among CMS’s, some say this small percentage of a decline is inconsequential. Matt Mullenweg has stated in previous interviews that he views market share stats as a “trailing indicator” in the quest to create the best possible experience for users and developers. A growing market share, in that sense, is a signal of user satisfaction.

WordPress jumped into the block paradigm at the right time, just as many other apps began adopting the concept of composable blocks for creating content and designs. Full-site editing is the extension of that vision but it takes time to make it something polished and delightful to use. McCarthy’s video is a good reminder of the limitations that users previously labored under while trying to edit their sites, and the “why” behind all the effort going into FSE.

“As someone who’s currently on the WordPress 6.0 Release Team, I can attest that the project needs more contributors,” WordPress contributor Nick Diego said in response to the recent market share discussion. “The fact that FSE has taken so long is not a lack of effort. There are many contributors pouring their hearts and souls into the project. We just need more help.”

Post Status: Post Status Upgrade — Zen and the Art of Lockpicking

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 05/20/2022 - 21:15

Learn new skills and build your knowledge to enhance your career in WordPress! Post Status Upgrade is an ongoing series of live workshops centered around a particular skill or learning activity.

Watch Robert Rowley explain the basics of lock picking in this live, hands-on workshop for Post Status members that took place on May 5th, 2022. Watch as Robert teaches participants how to open locks, as well as their minds. He shares stories about emotional intelligence and the life cycle of skill practice from the beginner's mind to the expert's. You'll laugh at some entertaining mishaps Robert has had with lock picks!

Robert Rowley

Robert Rowley is Patchstack‘s Security Advocate and has been picking locks since 2004. Between 2016 and 2019 Robert ran a retreat for his information security friends and colleagues called Disconnect Camp. This is where he first combined skills like lock picking with reflection on mental health, wellness, skill development and more.

StellarWP is a collective of WordPress innovators empowering business owners and creators with plugins and tools to help them thrive. We build great plugins, but we don’t stop there; we continually challenge ourselves to keep innovating and improving. Our solutions include the most trusted names in WordPress, with more than 2.5 million installs. Since 2021, we’ve grown to encompass seven brands and dozens of plugins. StellarWP is part of the Liquid Web family of brands.

Post Status: Post Status Upgrade — Zen and the Art of Lockpicking

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 05/20/2022 - 21:15

Learn new skills and build your knowledge to enhance your career in WordPress! Post Status Upgrade is an ongoing series of live workshops centered around a particular skill or learning activity.

Watch Robert Rowley explain the basics of lock picking in this live, hands-on workshop for Post Status members that took place on May 5th, 2022. Watch as Robert teaches participants how to open locks, as well as their minds. He shares stories about emotional intelligence and the life cycle of skill practice from the beginner's mind to the expert's. You'll laugh at some entertaining mishaps Robert has had with lock picks!

Robert Rowley

Robert Rowley is Patchstack‘s Security Advocate and has been picking locks since 2004. Between 2016 and 2019 Robert ran a retreat for his information security friends and colleagues called Disconnect Camp. This is where he first combined skills like lock picking with reflection on mental health, wellness, skill development and more.

StellarWP is a collective of WordPress innovators empowering business owners and creators with plugins and tools to help them thrive. We build great plugins, but we don’t stop there; we continually challenge ourselves to keep innovating and improving. Our solutions include the most trusted names in WordPress, with more than 2.5 million installs. Since 2021, we’ve grown to encompass seven brands and dozens of plugins. StellarWP is part of the Liquid Web family of brands.

Post Status: Getting Uncomfortable

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 05/20/2022 - 19:22

Growth is uncomfortable; you have to embrace the discomfort if you want to expand.

Jonathan Majors

Have you ever had to work outside of your comfort zone? It’s something I’m trying to get used to. But it sure isn’t easy.

This week and next I’m working from my dad’s home office in Tennessee while we prepare to sell his house.

This place is beautiful, and the view from the office is breathtaking. It’s easy to see why my dad loved it here.

But beautiful things can still be uncomfortable.

Traveling to WCEU has many people anxious about traveling after so long, and attending a WordCamp after a number of years.

But discomfort can help us grow, connect, and be more than we were before.

Whatever you’re doing, I hope you’ve built in a little discomfort to help you evaluate where you are, plan a course for the future, and thrive wherever you end up.

If you're going to WCEU, here are some tips on getting the most out of it!

Have a great weekend,

— Michelle

Akismet: Version 4.2.4 of the Akismet WordPress Plugin is Now Available

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 05/20/2022 - 10:01

Version 4.2.4 of the Akismet plugin for WordPress is now available. This update contains the following improvements:

  • Improved translator instructions for comment history.
  • Bumped the “Tested up to” tag to WP 6.0.

To upgrade, visit the Updates page of your WordPress dashboard and follow the instructions. If you need to download the plugin zip file directly, links to all versions are available in the WordPress plugins directory.

Do The Woo Community: Do the Woo is Heading to WordCamp Europe 2022 as a Media Partner

Wordpress Planet - Fri, 05/20/2022 - 09:00

WCEU is happening in Porto, Portugal. Find Do the Woo there and join us in a podcast or let's just have a conversation.

>> The post Do the Woo is Heading to WordCamp Europe 2022 as a Media Partner appeared first on Do the Woo - a WooCommerce Builder Community .

BuddyPress: BuddyPress 10.3.0 Maintenance Release

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 05/19/2022 - 21:45

Immediately available is BuddyPress 10.3.0. This maintenance release fixes seven bugs, mainly BP Nouveau improvements. It also makes sure BuddyPress is ready for the upcoming WordPress 6.0 release. For details on the changes, please read the 10.3.0 release notes.

Update to BuddyPress 10.3.0 today in your WordPress Dashboard, or by downloading it from the WordPress.org plugin repository.

Many thanks to 10.3.0 contributors 

 mike80222, oztaser, mackey1, shanebp, comminskidd32 & imath.

WPTavern: WP Tavern Is Hiring

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 05/19/2022 - 18:25

WP Tavern is looking for talented writers who are eager to report on WordPress news every day. We cover a wide range of topics, including (but not limited to) the Gutenberg project, core development, e-commerce, community, plugin and theme ecosystems, events, and the wider world of open source software. We are looking for writers who can inform, engage, and inspire readers with their work.

The position requires the ability to discern the immediacy of news stories that need to be told, attention to accuracy, and the ability to cultivate sources. Applicants must be willing to engage positively with the WordPress community and maintain an unwavering commitment to serve the public interest, without corporate influence. A deep knowledge of the WordPress ecosystem and the Gutenberg project is helpful for this position.

WP Tavern is WordPress’ newspaper of record. We are looking for writers who can approach this community with a critical and unbiased point of view, preserving the independent and provocative spirit of the Tavern. Applicants should use the contact form to get in touch, and be prepared to submit at least three writing samples for consideration.

Do The Woo Community: WooCommerce Checkout and Cart Blocks with Nadir Seghir

Wordpress Planet - Thu, 05/19/2022 - 09:28

Automattic engineer Nadir Seghir chats about where we are at with the WooCommerce cart and checkout blocks and where we are going.

>> The post WooCommerce Checkout and Cart Blocks with Nadir Seghir appeared first on Do the Woo - a WooCommerce Builder Community .

WPTavern: WooCommerce Calls for Early Testing on Custom Order Table Migrations

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 05/18/2022 - 21:05

At the beginning of this year, WooCommerce announced its plan to produce an MVP of custom order tables by Q3, 2022, a long-awaited improvement that promises significant performance gains for stores. The plugin’s development team is now calling for developers, agencies, and hosting companies to test migration to its first implementation of customer order tables.

The process involves migrating orders from wp_posts and wp_postmeta to four new custom orders tables:

  1. wp_wc_orders
  2. wp_wc_order_addresses
  3. wp_wc_order_operational_data
  4. wp_wc_orders_meta

It requires a staging environment configured with WP-CLI and a staging database pre-loaded with order data.

WooCommerce developer Vedanshu Jain has created a migration testing guide, which details the custom code developers will need to add in order to enable the custom order tables. Once enabled, developers will have the option to migrate tables using WP-CLI or via Action Scheduler.

Jain is requesting feedback from anyone who runs the migration process with details about how many orders, server memory size, DB version, and whether or not it timed out or responded better to a different batch size.

WooCommerce updating to use custom order tables will be a major change that will impact extension developers in different ways. The development team intends to publish an upgrade guide to support adoption of custom order tables after migrations have been ironed out. Later this year, when the update is anticipated to be rolled out to the core plugin, WooCommerce is aiming to make it strictly opt-in at first to allow shop owners time to make their sites compatible.

WordPress Foundation: The Kim Parsell Memorial Scholarship Returns for WordCamp US 2022

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 05/18/2022 - 20:42

The wait is over! WordCamp US is once again being held as an in-person, and with that the WordPress Foundation’s Kim Parsell Memorial Scholarship returns.

Kim’s commitment and valuable contributions to the WordPress open source project are honored at each in-person WordCamp US by the WordPress Foundation. The Foundation’s goal is to further the efforts of other contributors demonstrating Kim’s spirit by helping to ease the burden that travel can bring.

This scholarship is awarded to someone who:

  • Identifies as a woman.
  • Is a WordPress contributor.
  • Has never attended WordCamp US before.
  • Requires financial assistance to attend.

This scholarship provides financial assistance so that the recipient can attend WordCamp US, including travel from the recipient’s home city, hotel stay for the duration of the event, and a ticket to WordCamp US.

Finally, since the WordPress Foundation was unable to offer the scholarship in 2020 and 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this year only there will be three (3) scholarships awarded for 2022, 2021, and 2020.

If you meet these requirements and would like to be considered, please apply no later than Sunday, June 26, 2022 at 12 am Pacific. All applicants will be notified by July 5, 2022.

For more details, please visit the WordPress Foundation’s About the Kim Parsell Memorial Scholarship page.

Apply for the scholarship today.

WPTavern: Software Freedom Conservancy Receives Court Ruling Affirming GPL as Both Copyright License and Contractual Agreement

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 05/18/2022 - 18:03

The Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC),  a non-profit that provides infrastructure support for free and open source software projects, has received a favorable ruling in its right-to-repair lawsuit against Vizio, an American TV manufacturer. The SFC alleges that Vizio has demonstrated “repeated failures to fulfill even the basic requirements of the General Public License (GPL),” after the company refused to provide the source code for software with copyleft licenses that it bundles with its products.

Vizio had filed a request to “remove” the case from California State Court into U.S. Federal Court. After hearing oral arguments from both sides, the court has granted SFC’s motion to remand the case back to California State Court.

In the ruling, US District Court judge Josephine L. Staton stated that the GPL introduces “an additional contractual promise separate and distinct from any rights provided by the copyright laws:”

The Court finds Versata’s reasoning persuasive, and it finds here, as the court
found there, that the enforcement of “an additional contractual promise separate and distinct from any rights provided by the copyright laws” amounts to an “extra element,” and therefore, SFC’s claims are not preempted. Id. at *5. There is an extra element to SFC’s claims because SFC is asserting, as a third-party beneficiary of the GPL Agreements, that it is entitled to receive source code under the terms of those agreements. There is no right to receive certain works—or source code in particular—under the Copyright Act; indeed, the Act’s primary purpose is to limit who may reproduce, prepare derivative works, distribute, and display protected works. As SFC points out in its briefing, the right to receive the source code would appear to be “the very opposite” of those exclusive rights. (Reply, Doc. 26, at 17.) The fact that SFC claims status as a third-party beneficiary to the GPL Agreements and not the actual copyright holder—and therefore, has no authority to impose limitations on the reproduction and distribution of the software—only underscores that the contractual right at issue is qualitatively different from the rights under the Copyright Act. Thus, there can be no question that the extra element—that SFC is third-party enforcing its right to receive source code under the terms of a contract—transforms the nature of the action.

One of the functions of the SFC is to assist member projects in enforcing the terms of FLOSS licenses, including through litigation. This particular case is unique because the organization is presenting this lawsuit on behalf of individual consumers, as opposed to the traditional path of defending copyright holders of the GPL code in question.

“The ruling is a watershed moment in the history of copyleft licensing,” SFC executive director Karen Sandler said. “This ruling shows that the GPL agreements function both as copyright licenses and as contractual agreements.”

SFC contends that many electronics products are built for planned premature obsolescence and that companies often do this by violating the GPL. If the product is bundled with copyleft software, a consumer has the right to modify, improve, and repair the software. For this the be possible, the companies producing the products must make the source code available. This also enables consumers to find skilled people to repair their products when a device fails after updates have been disabled so that products do not become nonfunctional. This ruling is not just a major win for the GPL but also for consumers who may not know that companies violating the GPL significantly impact their ability to find repairs for electronic products.

“Software Freedom Conservancy looks forward to our opportunity to prove, in state court, our third-party beneficiary right to the complete, corresponding source code as defined by the GPL and related agreements,” Sandler said. “This claim is central to the right to software repair, as it allows users to exercise the right to copy, share, modify, and reinstall the software on the devices that they receive.”

WPTavern: #27 – Ana Segota and Kelly Choyce-Dwan on How To Use the New Pattern Creator

Wordpress Planet - Wed, 05/18/2022 - 14:00

On the podcast today we have Ana Segota and Kelly Choyce-Dwan.

I suspect that you might have heard about block patterns, but if you haven’t, you’re in for a treat. Patterns are collections of blocks which anyone can assemble for easy reuse at a later date. You can make them as simple or as complex as you, style them and save them away. When you’re ready to reuse them, they’re just one click away. It’s a great time saver.

Having said that, not all of us are great at design, or perhaps we’ve just not had the time to explore how block patterns are created. Wouldn’t it be great if there was a source of patterns which we could use in our WordPress websites, safe in the knowledge that they were completely free to use? There is,   and it’s called the Pattern Directory. You simply find a pattern you like and copy / paste it into your site.

You could stop there, but you could also use this as a way of learning how blocks are constructed. Open up the pattern to see how it’s laid out. What settings were used to create the styling?

Right now, the Pattern Directory is quite small. There’s a few hundred patterns to explore, but it could certainly do with some more contributions, and that is what this podcast is all about.

The Pattern Creator is the way to create patterns so that they can be submitted, reviewed, and hopefully accepted into the Pattern Directory.

We’ve got two perspectives on the podcast today from people who come at it from different angles.

Ana is a self taught WordPress themer and designer who is making use of patterns at Anariel Design, her website building business, and Kelly is an Automattician who has been working with the team building the Pattern Directory and Creator.

We talk about how the Creator works, how you can submit your patterns and what constraints are there for having your submissions accepted.

So, if you’re curious about how patterns can speed up your website building workflow, this episode is for you.

Useful links.

https://wordpress.org/news/2022/03/get-creative-with-the-all-new-pattern-creator/

https://wordpress.org/patterns/

https://wordpress.org/patterns/about/

https://wordpress.org/patterns/new-pattern/

Ana is @ana_segota on Twitter, and @anasegota on the Make Slack Channel.

Kelly is @ryelle on both Twitter and the Make Slack Channel.

Transcript

[00:00:00] Nathan Wrigley: Welcome to the Jukebox podcast from WP Tavern. My name is Nathan Wrigley. Jukebox is a podcast, which is dedicated to all things WordPress. The people, the events, the plugins, the blocks, the themes, and in this case, learning about the new pattern creator.

If you’d like to subscribe to the podcast, you can do that by searching for WP Tavern in your podcast player of choice, or by going to WP Tavern.com forward slash feed forward slash podcast. And you can copy that URL into most podcast players.

If you’ve got a topic that you’d like us to feature on the podcast, well, I’m very keen to hear from you, and hopefully get you, or your idea featured on the show. Head over to WP Tavern.com forward slash contact forward slash jukebox, and use the contact form there.

So on the podcast today, we have Ana Segota and Kelly Choyce-Dwan. I suspect that you’ve heard about block patterns, but if you haven’t, you’re in for a treat.

Patterns are collections of blocks which anyone can assemble for easy reuse at a later date. You can make them as simple or as complex as you like. Style them and save them away. When you’re ready to reuse them, they’re just one click away. It’s a great time-saver .

Having said that, not all of us are great at design, or perhaps we’ve just not had the time to explore how block patterns are created. Wouldn’t it be great if there was a source of patterns which we could use in our WordPress websites, safe in the knowledge that they were completely free to use? There is, and it’s called the pattern directory. You simply find a pattern that you like and copy paste it into your site.

You could stop there, but you could also use this as a way of learning how blocks are constructed. Open up the pattern and see how it’s laid out. What settings we’ll use to create the styling?

Right now, the pattern directory is quite small. There’s a few hundred pounds to explore, but it could certainly do with some more contributions. And that is what this podcast is about. The pattern creator is the way to create patterns so that they can be submitted, reviewed, and hopefully accepted into the Pattern Directory. We’ve got two perspectives on the podcast today from people who come at it from different angles.

Ana is a self-taught WordPress themer, and a designer who is making use of patterns in her website builds. And Kelly is an Automattician who has been working with the team building the Pattern Directory and Creator. We talk about how the creator works, how you can submit your patterns and what constraints are there for having your submissions accepted.

So, if you’re curious about how patterns can speed up your website building workflow, this episode is for you.

If you’re interested in finding out more, you can find all the links in the show notes by heading over to WP tavern.com forward slash podcast, where you’ll find all the other episodes as well.

And so without further delay, I bring you Ana Segota and Kelly Choyce-Dwan.

I am joined on the podcast today by Ana Segota and Kelly Choyce-Dwan. Hello.

[00:04:01] Ana Segota: Hi.

[00:04:01] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: Hello.

[00:04:02] Nathan Wrigley: Very nice to have you both here. As we always do at the beginning of the podcast, I’m going to give both of you an opportunity to introduce yourselves, to give us a bit of an orientation.

If you’ve listened to the introduction to this podcast, you probably know that we’re going to be talking about the pattern creator. And so it would be important to know why the two guests today are coming on talking about that. So, we’ll take it one at a time. We’ll begin with Ana. Ana, just tell us a little bit about your journey with WordPress and how come it is that you became involved with the pattern creator.

[00:04:33] Ana Segota: So, hi Nathan, nice to meet you and thank you for inviting me. So I’m Ana Segota, and I am a themer, and I love creating WordPress themes using block patterns. I always was more as a designer, but I learned to code to be able to create WordPress themes myself, but now having a block patterns is such a relief for me because I can concentrate on design more.

[00:05:04] Nathan Wrigley: That’s really nice. Thank you. Yeah. The intention of the tool is to make all of those decisions a little bit easier. So it’s nice, nice to know that in your case, it’s working. So, okay that’s going to be one perspective that we’ve got in the show today. And another perspective comes from Kelly. So Kelly, just spend a moment, tell us who you are please.

[00:05:21] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: Sure. So my name is Kelly Choyce-Dwan, also ryelle online. I work at Automattic and I have for over seven years. I started with WordPress in 2009, and I’m now working on the Meta team where my focus recently has been on the pattern directory and pattern creator.

[00:05:41] Nathan Wrigley: Now many people listening to this podcast will be very up-to-date users of WordPress. There’ll be using the tools that are shipping all of the time, and they may well have discovered patterns and be using them to great effect.

On the other hand, I suspect that there’ll be a fair amount of people who as yet have not delved into patterns. They may know what they are. They may not. So I’m wondering if we could really just rewind a little bit, make no assumptions about anybody’s knowledge about patterns and just lay out what they are. So it’s a very general question. Either of you feel free to answer it. What are patterns in WordPress and why might you wish to use them?

[00:06:24] Ana Segota: So for me block patterns, I like predefined and ready to use layout that you can click or drug and create pages. It’s like a collection of blocks arranged together to help you create different layouts. If you’ve used sometimes page builders, or Elementor templates, for example, it’s the same thing. You can use them on your website. You can adjust them, change the layout, change the colors. And I think they’re very useful.

[00:06:59] Nathan Wrigley: Thank you. So they are basically quick ways to build websites. You’re using other people’s predefined layouts. The work, in great measure, has been done for you. You can discover collections of blocks, which are generically called patterns, and you can click on those and import them into your post or page or whatever it might be.

So it speeds things up. I’m curious, for those of you, who’ve never used this before again, how do you actually build them? What’s the process that one might find themselves in, and bear in mind, we might be speaking to users of WordPress who are familiar with page builders, and don’t really find themselves interacting with the WordPress block editor.

So we may need to have a little bit of a description around there. What are we actually doing? How do we create and build patterns?

[00:07:51] Ana Segota: Okay. so mostly, I’m building block patterns for the themes. As a background, I first start, with niche, different niche, and what can be useful for that niche. And then I start creating block patterns directly in the editor, where you have all the options of block that you can combine in one block pattern.

So mostly I started with a group block, where I put then columns or cover or images, and start creating different ideas and different layout.

[00:08:34] Nathan Wrigley: Are you able to save those, as WordPress currently stands? Are you able to save those and I’ll stay with Ana. Are you able to save those Ana so that they can be reused on other websites. In other words, can you save more time by having your own little collection of blocks, which you then can use on this website over here and this other completely different website?

[00:08:58] Ana Segota: Maybe Kelly knows better, the other way, but what I know you can always copy the block you have and paste it on other website. Or you can export it. But not sure if you can save it inside the editor for like a gallery or something. I’m not sure that you can, or if you can do this, maybe Kelly knows that.

[00:09:22] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: Well, I know that you can, if you copy the block code into like a code file, the you can register it that way, but it requires code.

[00:09:33] Ana Segota: I think, there is no easy way to save it in a gallery for the beginner user, for example.

[00:09:41] Nathan Wrigley: At the moment, it feels as though it is the domain of people who are fairly experienced with WordPress. All of the tooling, with things like Elementor that you described, where you, you might have a private cloud of things that you’ve created in the past, and you can log in, and there’s a cloud service attached and you can download those to all of the other websites. We’re not quite at that point yet, although maybe some of the discussion that we’ll have today will revolve around that.

[00:10:10] Ana Segota: Yeah, I would love that.

[00:10:12] Nathan Wrigley: Yeah, that would be a really nice addition.

[00:10:14] Ana Segota: But I think the, pattern creator is doing some kind of saving those block patterns and one place where you can reuse it. But we will come to it.

[00:10:24] Nathan Wrigley: That’s okay. We’ll come to that in a moment. Just to say, patterns are collections of blocks and you piece them together, akin to a jigsaw and you build up designs, and style those designs, add images, add forms, add whatever it might be, background, color, padding, and so on, until you’ve got something that you’d like to look off. And at the moment, it probably lives within one WordPress website. But you can copy and paste that over somewhere else, but there’s no sort of cloud functionality.

And so, to the main conversation today, which is the pattern creator. Just so that you know, the links will be in the show notes to everything that we talk about today. And the pattern creator may well be something that you want to go and play with because it enables you to do a very large amount more than potentially you can do in your normal WordPress website. So, whoever wishes to take this. What is the pattern creator? Hopefully we’ll be providing people with the link so they can find that. That’s all good. But what’s the purpose of it? Why was it built? Why did the WordPress team decide that a tool like this needed to exist?

[00:11:33] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: So the pattern creator is a place to go and create patterns to share with anyone who uses WordPress, and it was created to make the process of making a sharing patterns easier. It’s a place that you can go and make a pattern and you know that it can be reused without having to write that code.

[00:11:54] Nathan Wrigley: So, at the moment it’s not only is it a place where you can go and create patterns. It’s a place where you can go and discover other people’s already created patterns. And if you’re, if you’re coming to this podcast from another page builder, think about it as rows. You’re essentially grabbing rows from websites or component parts of websites. And so it serves that double purpose. Not only can you create your own, but you can also go and freely download other people’s work. Have I got that right? Have I misstated that?

[00:12:25] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: That’s correct?

[00:12:26] Nathan Wrigley: So in terms of how the editor works, we need to go to the website, the pattern creator website. And once we’re there, my understanding is that you need a, a wordpress.org account.

Once you’ve got yourself, a wordpress.org account, you can log in and you are presented with something which looks very, very similar to the usual WordPress block editor interface. It’s a little bit more spartan because the menu on the left kind of basically doesn’t exist. So all of those options for posts and pages and what have you are gone. Let’s talk about the design decisions.

So the menu on the left is gone. We’ve got the option to add blocks. Are we just dealing with a subset of the core blocks or can we add any of the core blocks?

[00:13:15] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: It is a subset currently, because we don’t have the dynamic content that might be on your website. So we can’t replicate the full experience of using that block. But almost all of the core blocks are available.

[00:13:30] Nathan Wrigley: Okay, so you can log in and you can start building out your blocks, or rather, I should say you can start building out your patterns. Then presumably there’s some kind of save process. And if you’re happy with things, can you use this if you chose to do it this way, can you use this as a private repository of your own blocks, that you’re maybe not ready to share with the world? Maybe they have to be kept in a draft state or something like that. Could it be used in that way? I know that’s not the intention. The intention is to have them shareable, but you were to design something and be not entirely satisfied with it, could you keep it there and come back to it at a later date and tweak it?

[00:14:13] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: Yeah, totally. You can save things as drafts. Actually, when we were first building it out, one of the ideas was that it could be a private repo for you to put your own patterns in. That isn’t built yet, but it could be in the future.

[00:14:26] Nathan Wrigley: So there is a kind of workaround to make it a directory of your own, if you simply save things as draft. But that isn’t the point. The intention is to make it universally available to everybody. And so on.

Does this require an up to date version of Gutenberg on the backend? So just to be clear, it’s like a SaaS product. You’re not installing WordPress anywhere. You are just going to a website and interacting with it. But I’m just curious to know, as Gutenberg is updated and modified and the blocks change, we’re several years in, and there’s been a great deal of change in the way that certain things work.

Do you have confidence that everything that you build today will look the same in, let’s say a couple of years time. In other words, do you anticipate that some things may break in the future or are you trying as hard as possible to mitigate against that?

[00:15:18] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: Well, I hope it won’t, but the pattern creator is using always the stable version of Gutenberg. So it will always be up-to-date when you’re creating patterns. Patterns created a few months ago, we’re created with an older version of Gutenberg, but between backwards compatibility block transformation, Gutenberg is trying not to break your content too. So I’m fairly confident that things will continue to work. If there are patterns that do brake, we have a reporting mechanism for reporting that.

[00:15:51] Nathan Wrigley: So it’s just Core blocks that we need to worry about. And it’s a subset of the Core blocks. Now, I’m looking on the interface at the moment. There’s the option for me to add a title? Obviously that’s just for the purposes of knowing what the pattern is that I’m saving somewhere. And then I can, in the normal way, click the little plus icon and I can add blocks as I choose. Put a group in, put some columns in and so on, and fiddle with those blocks just as I would do on my regular WordPress website.

And I’ve got the list view where I can see the stack of all of the different things that. I’ve created. And then on the right-hand side, you’ve got a title and a description. Do both of those serve the purpose of showing to somebody, once it’s been submitted to the pattern directory, which we’ll get onto in just a moment. Those titles and descriptions would give the people, browsing the pattern directory, some orientation as to what it was about and what it was designed to achieve.

[00:16:46] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: Yeah, that’s right. The title is the pattern title, and it’s the same when you’re in that little sidebar and the top title, they’re just two inputs for the same thing. Good title would describe what the pattern is, like one of the pattern contains, what it should be used for.

[00:17:01] Nathan Wrigley: Then in order to presumably aid search on the other end in the pattern directory. Currently we have six categories. There’s no option to create categories of your own. At the minute we look like we’ve got buttons, columns, gallery, header, images, text, and then there’s the option to add in keywords, maximum of 10.

Again, is this all just to help the taxonomy of it, to help assist people on the other side to locate things which you’ve got buttons in and specifically columns and galleries and so on? Is that the That’s the sole purpose of that.

[00:17:34] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: That’s right. And, they’re also used, those are the same properties that are used in WordPress Core when you’re registering patterns.

[00:17:41] Nathan Wrigley: So I could spend hours happily building out my new blocks and constructing them up into patterns and saving them away. And once I’ve got something that I’m happy with, there’s a blue submit button at the top right hand corner in the same way that you would have publish in WordPress typically, but this is submit.

What is the process, what’s going on there? What is the list of things which happen after that? So I’m thinking in terms of, I just clicked submit, but presumably at that point, all sorts of other things are set in motion. Maybe it’s sent to a particular team and people have to authorize things and check that it doesn’t break any guidelines. And that might be a long list of things that go on in the background there.

[00:18:24] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: Yeah. So when you submit a pattern, it asks you a few things more just to make sure you filled out all of your details. there are a few things that we’ll check for automatically, making sure you’re using a decent title. We’ve had a few patterns that are just called my pattern, which isn’t helpful for other people. So we detect things like that.

So after the automated checks, it does get submitted as pending. So it does not automatically approved yet. And there is a pattern review team that will look through the pending patterns and publish things that are valid. Most things do get published. So you probably would get published within a day or two.

[00:19:02] Ana Segota: It’s mostly hours or a day. I submitted here, so top, one day

[00:19:08] Nathan Wrigley: Yeah, it’s really quick. A big gripe about the, let’s say the theme review team or the plugin review team was that there was quite a long wait, sometimes very long. There’s a lot more complexity, I guess, within a theme, a lot more code floating about. So at the moment. if you submit something, as of, let’s say May 2022, you’re very likely to have a decision fairly quickly.

In terms of that being authorized, what are the guidelines? What are the kinds of things that are allowed and disallowed? In other words, so you mentioned that a good title, a good descriptive title is going to set you on the road to having its, authorized and put on the pattern directory.

Are there any other guidelines that need to be, you need to be mindful of? Not only in terms of getting it submitted, but things that you don’t want people to submit because it contravenes certain rules or regulations.

[00:20:03] Ana Segota: I think the most important part is to combine multiple blocks together, so not just to use one block and post it. So multiply blocks together and create some interesting and useful layouts. So maybe front design part and also something that can be creative and useful to the users. Also to highlight the capabilities of the blocks they contain and provide a starting point to customize the content.

Good pattern book needs to be, has a well-defined purpose too. And for don’ts, maybe to avoid to design patterns for a single theme. So to think about it to be used in different websites. Not to create a pattern that is like a full page. Or just a simple pattern that is using a paragraph. And I think you need to use photos from the gallery there. You can’t import your photos or from some other website, and that’s probably it.

[00:21:11] Nathan Wrigley: So the photos are coming in from, Kelly, maybe you can help us out here. Are they coming in from Openverse?

[00:21:18] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: They are yeah. It’s all CC0 photos from Openverse. So they’re able to be used by anyone without any, without worry about crediting people.

[00:21:27] Ana Segota: Yeah, that’s very helpful.

[00:21:30] Nathan Wrigley: Another podcast episode altogether isn’t it? The whole Openverse project’s fabulous. Yeah. so obviously there’s constraints in terms of the do’s, you know, it needs to be usable on multiple websites, and so on, just as Ana said, but there’s some certain don’ts as well. We’ve prevented the ability to upload images by just using Openverse images, which is great.

But also, I guess that would be in terms of the text that you write into paragraph or heading fields, there would be a requirement for it to be, let’s call it family friendly. You know, we don’t want anything which might cause anybody any hassle and presumably that’s a trip wire which the team would immediately reject it on.

So, okay. Let’s let’s imagine that we’ve built this fabulous pattern. It’s absolutely hit the guidance on the head and it’s been approved. What then? Where does it go? Where does it live? How can other people find it?

[00:22:24] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: So it’s in the pattern directory, which is just wordpress.org/patterns. You can use that website to search through patterns. Once you found a pattern that you like, you’re able to use it in your own website, just by simply copying it. And there is a copy button on each pattern that you can use to copy the code for it.

And if you just paste that straight into your editor, you have that pattern.

[00:22:48] Nathan Wrigley: So, you go to the pattern directory, presumably you would then search and filter against the things which you created when you were submitting your pattern. And then there’s a simple copy and paste button. You copy it. It’s in the clipboard of your computer and you just go over to your website and in an empty block, there’s no sort of container or wrapper that you need to stick it in. You literally just paste it into a brand new empty text block and all will work?

[00:23:18] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: Yep.

[00:23:19] Ana Segota: Yeah.

[00:23:19] Nathan Wrigley: Are there any gotchas there? Because that process, whilst it’s not necessarily quite as optimal as the cloud that we were talking about earlier, where you could actually see it within your WordPress website, which I guess ultimately would be an easier experience?

Does it always work? Are there any situations where copying and pasting that code has unexpected consequences. I don’t mean things breaking. I just mean that the styling, for example, something that the theme brings to bear might make things look peculiar and not quite how you intended.

[00:23:51] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: Yeah, I think that’s possible because it is, I mean it uses the Core blocks. So if your theme styles the core blocks minimally, maybe, you’ll probably be fine, but if your theme is doing anything really creative with some of the blocks, I suppose you could have some trouble where a quote that you copied from the pattern directory looks totally different on your site.

[00:24:12] Ana Segota: But if you are using a full site editing theme, I think you are good with.

[00:24:17] Nathan Wrigley: It should just work. Yeah. Do you know if there’s any intention to bring any of this kind of functionality into WordPress Core. And what I’m meaning by that is that I could hook up my let’s say wordpress.org account to my website. And then I could create patterns inside my website and then authorize them to be submitted to the pattern directory.

I feel like that might be quite a useful workflow at some point in the future, because then you’re not necessarily having to go out and go to a different website in order to create the patterns and publish them and so on. And equally, I wonder if in the future there are any plans to make it so that I can pull these patterns in, in the same way that we described that page builders like Elementor and so on, have their cloud templates and so on, and so forth.

[00:25:11] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: Yeah, I think the second is much more likely than the first. So if you were to create a pattern on your own website. Uh, you might be using any number of blocks that are not Core blocks. So I don’t know that creating a pattern on your website and pushing it up is on the roadmap at least, because there’s a lot more gotchas. We can’t control the media that you’re using. Like we’re able to use Open verse images on the pattern creator.

So there’s a lot more, a lot more like gotchas that way. But, having an ability to pull patterns from the pattern directory on wordpress.org into your own site. I do think that that is probably going to happen soon.

Already, you can call out, well already in WordPress 6.0, you’ll be able to register pattern slugs when you’re building a theme, and then it will pull down those patterns from the pattern directory. So you can pull patterns like that.

[00:26:06] Nathan Wrigley: Yeah. That’s, that’s interesting. So imagine that I’ve submitted one of my patterns. I’m very happy with it, but a year or two passes and I now for goodness knows what reason, I now don’t wish that pattern to be part of the directory. I’m wondering if either of you have any knowledge about whether things can be removed or once I’ve submitted it, is it up there for life? And I have essentially given it over to the community in perpetuity.

[00:26:36] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: You can revert your pattern to draft, if you want to take it down. You can also trash it. We’re not tied to always supporting things the way that the theme and plugin directories are because there isn’t really as much of a tie to your content and this thing on wordpress.org, because once you copy a pattern down, you have it, you don’t need to sync back up with the parent. So we don’t need to, we don’t have the same issues of keeping something around.

[00:27:00] Nathan Wrigley: Yeah, so you can curate that yourself. You can just, if you like return it to a draft status. So there’s a permanent connection between the wordpress.org repository that I can access with my user login and password, and the pattern being published. In other words, when I clicked submit, it’s not just taken from my submission and put into some other SaaS, if you like.

So my expectation was that when I submitted it, much in the same way that I was submitting a form on a website, that form can then live somewhere else. You know, the form submission can come to me via email. I can’t rescind that form being sent. But in the directory the submit button and the draft status button is directly connected to whether it’s on the pattern directory.

So if I click draft again, it will immediately, without any human supervision, it will suck it out of the directory and mean that it’s no longer there.

[00:28:03] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: Yeah, that that’s correct.

[00:28:05] Nathan Wrigley: Yeah, I really didn’t understand that. I just assumed that I was submitting it rather like a form. Somebody would inspect it, check it into another platform. So that’s kind of good to know.

[00:28:15] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: Yeah. It also means that you can edit. So if you make your pattern and then you decide that you actually, you’ve submitted it, it’s been a week though. And you don’t like the color of the button. You can make that change. It’ll submit it back to pending, and it has to go through that review again. But, once it’s published, your pattern will have the new change now.

[00:28:34] Nathan Wrigley: Okay. So we have to go through the process. Do you have any insight into how popular patterns have become over time? I mean, I still feel that the editing experience for proprietary page builders is something that people are keen for Gutenberg to have. You know, in other words, what you see is literally what you get.

There’s no ifs or buts, it’s just exactly the same on the backend as it is on the front end. And I feel that a lot of people are not moving over to Gutenberg because that experience is not there yet. So, this one may be for Kelly, it may be for Ana. Ana, you might like to draw on, you know, your experience or maybe your friends and colleagues. Is it as usable yet? Are patterns as useful to you as your page builder that you may have used in the past yet? Or if we still got a way to go, what are your, what are your instincts on that?

[00:29:25] Ana Segota: From my point of view, I think the block patterns are now really well made and they can be really useful. And I think they are mostly easier to use them. So for the user’s point of view, but they come more to the problem where we are starting to use templates, for example. Full site editing and templates. Block patterns are I think easiest part from the whole full site editing,.

From my experience, mostly they like block patterns but, I think we are still in early stage because there is not a lot of themes that are full site editing themes. And sometimes we also have older themes that we are updating with block patterns, but it’s like a mix of old way and new way. So I think when we start doing more full site editing themes, it will get easier and user will get to know znd to accept it more.

But I think block patterns are really useful from the user side, but templates are a bit tricky now, I must say, a bit confusing because we have a two editors now, like site editor and normal editor that they know from past. And they’re asking why I see now here block pattern, but in the old editor I need to click on the edit template to edit the template. It’s a bit tricky and confusing at the moment I must confess.

[00:31:00] Nathan Wrigley: We’re on the cusp of WordPress 6.0 being released, and as each different, a new release comes around, there is more being added and the complexity sometimes goes up and hopefully at some point the complexity will go down again and be more straightforward to use.

I guess that one of the biggest wins of using patterns and the pattern directory, which you would submit things to with the creator, is that all of this is just free. It’s completely freely available. You can use it in any which way you’d like, there’s no constraints over how you might use it. And if we rewind the clock about, oh, I don’t know, let’s go for about 12 or 13 years.

I imagine that the plug-in directory felt like a similar thing, you know, you would submit your plugin and within a few hours, somebody would say yes. That’s great, thank you very much. We now know that WordPress has 50,000 plus plugins. The directory whilst being very useful is quite hard, it’s very difficult to track things down. We’ve got certain things being recommended because they’re popular and it may be hard for people to have their bits and pieces discovered.

I’m just wondering, Kelly I’ll fire this one at you. I’m just wondering if in the future there are plans to make it so that as you submit patterns, there’s maybe more options around curating it, more taxonomy, terms, greater ways of being able to search and discover things. Because at the moment, it’s easy.

There’s a handful of patterns, well, that’s not quite true, but you get point. There aren’t 50,000 of them. But in the future, when this takes off, I could see there being literally hundreds of thousands of patterns. And at that point it’s going to be extremely difficult to separate the ones that you would like from the ones which are just there in front of you, but you don’t necessarily feel able to use. So really I’m just wondering how that may be curated in the future. Any roadmap plans for that?

[00:33:00] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: Yeah. you’re right there are, what did you say, 50,000 plugins?

[00:33:03] Nathan Wrigley: Yeah,

[00:33:04] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: Yeah, there’s 400 patterns.

[00:33:06] Nathan Wrigley: Yeah, yeah.

[00:33:07] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: So a little different. I don’t know that there’s any concrete roadmap for what the future of this directory might look like. There are some discussions about whether there should be different categories, like buttons, columns, taxonomy. There’s questions about how we should handle patterns that are more for site building versus just content patterns. So I do think that this is all very much still like to be decided, and really if anyone has opinions, I’m sure we’d love to hear them.

[00:33:39] Nathan Wrigley: Yeah, we’ll get onto that actually now because that feels like a good point. So obviously this is being built out in the open. The pair of you have obviously taken a great interest in it, but it may be that people listening to this, this is new to them. And they think that they would like to play with this a little bit, become involved with the team.

So maybe again, I’ll direct this one at Kelly first off. Are there any ways, better ways where people can get involved in the project of the directory or the creator? Where are the best places to go and hang out?

[00:34:12] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: If you want to have feedback about the future of the pattern directory or if you just want to report that something’s not working. The project is on GitHub. It’s at github.com/wordpress/patterndirectory.

[00:34:27] Nathan Wrigley: So that’s the best place to go if you wish to find out about becoming involved. Ana, just wondering about your experiences of being involved with this. Have you got any, any insights? Is there a thing that you found the most useful? A, I don’t know, a Slack channel or a website where people are helping each other out. A group of some kind, maybe a community online somewhere where this is all happening?

[00:34:50] Ana Segota: I was in contact per Slack, with Anne McCartney also and, mostly Slack and Twitter, but yeah, mostly Slack or Github, yeah.

[00:35:01] Nathan Wrigley: Now, I know that neither of you will be able to answer this question directly, but the theme repository and the plugin repository, they feel like there’s no way that they are going away. They’re going to be here for the long-term. You know, I can imagine decades from now, they’ll still be in existence. Do you both have confidence that this journey that we’ve taken on where blocks and patterns are becoming the new, the new way of creating quick and easy websites. Do you feel confident that this is the way it’s going to be done? You know, that we ought to sail our ship in this direction?

Your long-term thoughts really on whether or not this is the way it’s going to be done in the future.

[00:35:40] Ana Segota: I hope so. I really hope so. I think this way is, better way of making, for example, I am in theme business, so, it’s easier to create themes. Especially to offer easier way of using themes to users. So finally theme can be a design for me, and that’s a really big step in the right direction. So I really hope it will stay. And also be better with the time and more easier to use.

[00:36:12] Nathan Wrigley: Thank you. And Kelly.

[00:36:14] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: Yeah, I do think that this is the way forward. I think that using blocks and making patterns is really only going to become more, more standard. Easier to use. And so I think that this is going to be the way to make websites

[00:36:28] Nathan Wrigley: Yeah. Just one last quick thought. I mentioned something similar earlier and Ana talked about it, I’m going to direct this one at you, Kelly, if that’s all right. I don’t know what your experience is with other website building tools. And we mentioned page builders, such as Elementor and, I just wondered what your thoughts are on where the user interface is and the user experience is at the moment.

Maybe you’ve got some insight into that. Maybe you don’t, but I just wondered whether you thought that it was yet at a point of maturity. And that kind of ties into the question I’ve just asked about whether it would be widely adopted, because it feels like there’s a big holdout of people the moment who simply cannot make the move because the experience as yet doesn’t have that, it’s exactly the same on the front end, as it is on the backend. And Ana, I think you just said, Yeah in the background. You can identify. You’ve committed, you’ve jumped over and you’ve made that journey and put the investment of time into…

[00:37:24] Ana Segota: Yeah, but it takes a lot of challenges, yeah. Because I get the input from the user side and I also used Elementor before to see how it works. And I must say it’s still a long way. But, what is most confusing now to the users, what I said before, also, those two editors and two different phase. We now have again templates that you can edit.

And they’re a bit confused. Like, okay, I go on out to edit the template and I saved it and now it’s applied to all my pages and now you need to explain it that they need to refresh it and pull it back. And it’s a bit confusing. So we don’t have one editor where you can do all the things. For example, you come to one editor and click, for example, to choose a layout and this layout is there and you can edit it and that’s it. Yeah, it’s a bit struggle for now.

[00:38:25] Nathan Wrigley: I do wonder if that struggle, and I’m going to see what Kelly makes on this, I do wonder if that’s going to be for a little while into the future, if that’s going to be a limitation in terms of adoption, is the fact that there are difficulties. There’s a lot of learning which needs to take place to wean you off those tools and, whilst the WordPress Core way of doing blocks and patterns and so on is free, widely available, done in the open, open source and all of that kind of stuff. I wonder if the adoption is going to be stifled because of the constraints that Ana just mentioned. What do you think about that?

[00:39:04] Ana Segota: I think it depends also on us, on themers a lot. How we will implement this and make it easier for the users. And we also need to educate now the users, how they can use it and make it as easier as possible. And sometimes there’s not that easy because you need to follow updates and to do the updates all the time and to educate people about it.

But I think it’s a good step in the right direction. And I think with the time and with the education people will adopted it yeah. Just by creating a pages using just block pattern it’s a really a big step. And it’s a great thing. You can really create most everything with block patterns without using templates for example.

[00:39:54] Nathan Wrigley: Yeah, I think people just need time, the inspiration to get into it…

[00:39:59] Ana Segota: It’s a new, it’s a new thing and you always need time to learn something new.

[00:40:03] Nathan Wrigley: That’s right. We actually interviewed Courtney Robertson from the Learn initiative last week. And there’s an awful lot of content. And I think that’s maybe a piece that was missing in the past, the ability to go and find video tutorials, which answer the exact question that you’re looking for.

Kelly, can I put that one to you? Is it basically the same question? You said that you hadn’t got a great deal of experience with page builders and so on, but I’m just wondering if you had any intuitions around there, whether or not the UI and the UX is, is everything that you guys had hoped it would be, or do you feel that there’s still quite a lot of work going through WordPress six and seven and maybe even, eight.

[00:40:39] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: Yeah, I haven’t used page filters. I am definitely a pretty vanilla WordPress user. But I have been, you know, working with the site editor and I can see that it is a little confusing still. I do think that it needs to be iterated on, but I think that the future is going to be good.

I think the plans are there and it’s constantly getting better. So I’m very positive about it. Yeah.

[00:41:02] Nathan Wrigley: Thank you. Okay, just to wrap up, if people have listened to this podcast today and they would like to get in touch with you and make contact and use your expertise. What’s the best way of getting in touch with you? It could be a Twitter handle could be an email address, or it could be nothing. You might wish to share nothing at all, but I’ll start with Ana. What’s the best way to get in touch with you, Ana?

[00:41:24] Ana Segota: Twitter, or Slack or email. It’s all good. Maybe you can add a later?

[00:41:31] Nathan Wrigley: Yeah, I will definitely add your Twitter and Slack into the show notes. And same question to you, Kelly. What’s the best way to get in touch with you?

[00:41:40] Kelly Choyce-Dwan: You can find me on Twitter, Ryelle, R Y E L L E or on wordpress.org Slack. I can also chat there.

[00:41:49] Nathan Wrigley: Okay, Ana and Kelly, thank you so much for talking to me on the podcast today, and I appreciate you giving me an hour of your time. Thank you very much, indeed.

Post Status: WooCommerce 6.5, 6.5.1, and WooCommerce Blocks 7.6

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 05/17/2022 - 21:00

Well, the week started the release of  WooCommerce 6.5  and ended with a  6.5.1 bug fix release. Between all of that, WooCommerce Blocks 7.6 was also released.

Over on Do the Woo, we had a conversation about the upcoming release of WordPress 6.0. The Woo Roundtable, consisting of Ronald Gijsel, Robbie Adair, Robert Jacobi, and Tammie Lister dove in to offer some insights about 6.0 and how WooCommerce plays into it.

Then Ronnie Burt from Sensei LMS and Automattic shared his extensive experience in the wider education space and his journey to move into the WordPress ecosystem, and LMS space:

“And so when I think about democratizing education, I think about how do we help [provide] the best content [so the] best learning experiences bubble to the top and be found.”

A little bird told me about a drop in the WordPress market share. Or actually, a Tweet from Joost de Valk. As a result I had to add my small take to the influx of reaction we have seen. It's short!

I think we just need to wait and see what shakes out. It's too early to say if this is a new trend.

“…I am not losing any sleep over that number right now. To be fair, depending on your own stakes, you may feel differently. And trust me, there are some interesting insights that Joost shared in the post, as well as others that are either agreeing with or serving a rebuttal. And if you dare go down that rabbit hole, well, good luck.”

Trust me, I didn’t spend much time on my response for several reasons:

“I have had touchpoints in the technical space for over 3 decades. If I was someone that could predict what came next for any specific technology, or 100% understood a lot of the ups and downs, well, maybe I wouldn't be rich but I would sure have a lot to talk about.”

WooBits: Dropping My .02% About WordPress Marketshare  

WPTavern: Online Meetup: WordPress NYC to Host Series on Modern, Privacy-Respecting Analytics and Leveraging First-Party Data

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 05/17/2022 - 17:34

One of the positive effects of the COVID-19 pandemic is local meetups are more frequently broadcasting their events online, giving people outside the immediate area the opportunity to attend and learn new skills. Searching meetup.com for WordPress, filtered to show Online Events, will show upcoming events that anyone can attend.

WordPress NYC is hosting an interesting new six-part series on analytics beginning this week on Thursday, May 19, at 7PM EDT. Co-organizer Victor Ramirez will kick it off with a workshop titled “The Product & Marketing Data Landscape.” Attendees will get an overview of  the current WordPress analytics landscape. Subsequent events will cover how to make a tracking plan, how to migrate to open source tracking options (while respecting privacy), and how to leverage WordPress data to improve user experiences.

Ramirez is the lead product analytics engineer at The Knot Worldwide and also runs a WordPress agency on the side.

“I was inspired because product analytics has been my job for two years,” Ramirez said. “It’s one of the hottest roles in technology everywhere except WordPress.”

During the workshop he plans to demonstrate the benefits of using Rudderstack, an open source customer data pipeline tool, and Avo workbench, a data governance platform, comparing those to private enterprise options. The schedule for the series includes weekly presentations through June 23:

The series will introduce attendees to the concept of collecting first-party data (as opposed to third-party data) and learn how to create better, privacy-respecting experiences for consumers, instead of “targeting” them with unwanted messages.

 If you’re using WordPress for a product or service, this workshop may give you a new way to think about consumer data collection for your business. The event is free and the link to attend online will be visible for those who sign up to attend.

WPTavern: Online Meetup: WordPress NYC to Host Series on Modern, Privacy-Respecting Analytics and Leveraging First-Party Data

Wordpress Planet - Tue, 05/17/2022 - 17:34

One of the positive effects of the COVID-19 pandemic is local meetups are more frequently broadcasting their events online, giving people outside the immediate area the opportunity to attend and learn new skills. Searching meetup.com for WordPress, filtered to show Online Events, will show upcoming events that anyone can attend.

WordPress NYC is hosting an interesting new six-part series on analytics beginning this week on Thursday, May 19, at 7PM EDT. Co-organizer Victor Ramirez will kick it off with a workshop titled “The Product & Marketing Data Landscape.” Attendees will get an overview of  the current WordPress analytics landscape. Subsequent events will cover how to make a tracking plan, how to migrate to open source tracking options (while respecting privacy), and how to leverage WordPress data to improve user experiences.

Ramirez is the lead product analytics engineer at The Knot Worldwide and also runs a WordPress agency on the side.

“I was inspired because product analytics has been my job for two years,” Ramirez said. “It’s one of the hottest roles in technology everywhere except WordPress.”

During the workshop he plans to demonstrate the benefits of using Rudderstack, an open source customer data pipeline tool, and Avo workbench, a data governance platform, comparing those to private enterprise options. The schedule for the series includes weekly presentations through June 23:

The series will introduce attendees to the concept of collecting first-party data (as opposed to third-party data) and learn how to create better, privacy-respecting experiences for consumers, instead of “targeting” them with unwanted messages.

 If you’re using WordPress for a product or service, this workshop may give you a new way to think about consumer data collection for your business. The event is free and the link to attend online will be visible for those who sign up to attend.

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