Development News

Niels de Feyter: Is Drupal Still the Leading CMS in 2022 and 2023?

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 06/23/2022 - 10:14
The question we want to answer in this blog post is whether Drupal is still the leading CMS platform in 2022 and beyond. If you have been thinking of trying out Drupal, this article will help you decide whether it is still worth it in 2022. Let’s jump right in!

Niels de Feyter: Is Drupal Still the Leading CMS in 2022 and 2023?

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 06/23/2022 - 10:14
The question we want to answer in this blog post is whether Drupal is still the leading CMS platform in 2022 and beyond. If you have been thinking of trying out Drupal, this article will help you decide whether it is still worth it in 2022. Let’s jump right in!

Niels de Feyter: Is Drupal Still the Leading CMS in 2022 and 2023?

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 06/23/2022 - 10:14
The question we want to answer in this blog post is whether Drupal is still the leading CMS platform in 2022 and beyond. If you have been thinking of trying out Drupal, this article will help you decide whether it is still worth it in 2022. Let’s jump right in!

ImageX: Control How Your Drupal Content Looks on Facebook and Twitter Shares

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 06/23/2022 - 00:23
Social shares can significantly increase your brand exposure, expand your reach, boost your website traffic, and benefit your SEO. Of course, all this works much better if your shared content looks attractive, relevant, and well-formatted on social media.  Content preview snippets are built automatically when someone shares a link on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and so on. They include a title, a description, an image, or other details. Can you control how they look and make them so irresistibly clickable? Yes, sure, you can do this by setting up social media meta tags on your website. 

ImageX: Control How Your Drupal Content Looks on Facebook and Twitter Shares

Main Drupal Feed - Thu, 06/23/2022 - 00:23
Social shares can significantly increase your brand exposure, expand your reach, boost your website traffic, and benefit your SEO. Of course, all this works much better if your shared content looks attractive, relevant, and well-formatted on social media.  Content preview snippets are built automatically when someone shares a link on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and so on. They include a title, a description, an image, or other details. Can you control how they look and make them so irresistibly clickable? Yes, sure, you can do this by setting up social media meta tags on your website. 

Lullabot: Paper Prototyping for Websites and Digital Products

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 06/22/2022 - 16:23

Have you ever spent a lot of time on something for your project, only to throw it away? Often someone else interacts with your work and uncovers something important. Perhaps the issue came from a stakeholder, real users, or the implementation team, and their input is important. But now, you have to go back to the drawing board. We can relate.

Lullabot: Paper Prototyping for Websites and Digital Products

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 06/22/2022 - 16:23

Have you ever spent a lot of time on something for your project, only to throw it away? Often someone else interacts with your work and uncovers something important. Perhaps the issue came from a stakeholder, real users, or the implementation team, and their input is important. But now, you have to go back to the drawing board. We can relate.

Lullabot: Paper Prototyping for Websites and Digital Products

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 06/22/2022 - 16:23

Have you ever spent a lot of time on something for your project, only to throw it away? Often someone else interacts with your work and uncovers something important. Perhaps the issue came from a stakeholder, real users, or the implementation team, and their input is important. But now, you have to go back to the drawing board. We can relate.

Peoples BLOG: Quick reference of Code Reviews for Drupal Application

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 06/22/2022 - 16:15
In this article we are going to see how your Drupal team can do code reviews and available tools or libraries which help people in the team to do the code reviews seamlessly. It’s pretty important to follow a few guidelines as well, so that all people or developers in the team are on the same page. Firstly, for the code reviews to be at their best, the committed code should be more organis

Peoples BLOG: Quick reference of Code Reviews for Drupal Application

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 06/22/2022 - 16:15
In this article we are going to see how your Drupal team can do code reviews and available tools or libraries which help people in the team to do the code reviews seamlessly. It’s pretty important to follow a few guidelines as well, so that all people or developers in the team are on the same page. Firstly, for the code reviews to be at their best, the committed code should be more organis

LakeDrops Drupal Consulting, Development and Hosting: ECA rules engine for Drupal: RC1 released

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 06/22/2022 - 15:25
ECA rules engine for Drupal: RC1 released Jürgen Haas Wed, 06/22/2022 - 17:25

A huge milestone for the ECA team has finally being reached: it is available for everyone to give it a try. ECA and its main modeller BPMN.iO are considered stable and ready for testing and almost production ready. This is a big achievement after 11 months and around 3.000 hours of architecting, developing and testing the new rules engine for Drupal 9 and 10.

ANNAI Magazine: Migrating Japanese Digital Agency's website to Drupal: ANNAI's talk at Drupalcon Portland 2022

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 06/22/2022 - 12:51

We gave a talk at Drupalcon Portland 2022 about the Unified Government Website project we have been working on, as well as the migration of the Japanese Digital Agency website to a Headless CMS (Drupal + Next.js) as a feasibility study.

The talk consisted of three parts:

  1. Migration of the Digital Agency website to a headless CMS
  2. Research project for the realisation of a unified government website
  3. The future direction of the project

This blog post describes the first part above.

ANNAI Magazine: Migrating Japanese Digital Agency's website to Drupal: ANNAI's talk at Drupalcon Portland 2022

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 06/22/2022 - 12:51

We gave a talk at Drupalcon Portland 2022 about the Unified Government Website project we have been working on, as well as the migration of the Japanese Digital Agency website to a Headless CMS (Drupal + Next.js) as a feasibility study.

The talk consisted of three parts:

  1. Migration of the Digital Agency website to a headless CMS
  2. Research project for the realisation of a unified government website
  3. The future direction of the project

This blog post describes the first part above.

ANNAI Magazine: Migrating Japanese Digital Agency's website to Drupal: ANNAI's talk at Drupalcon Portland 2022

Main Drupal Feed - Wed, 06/22/2022 - 12:51

We gave a talk at Drupalcon Portland 2022 about the Unified Government Website project we have been working on, as well as the migration of the Japanese Digital Agency website to a Headless CMS (Drupal + Next.js) as a feasibility study.

The talk consisted of three parts:

  1. Migration of the Digital Agency website to a headless CMS
  2. Research project for the realisation of a unified government website
  3. The future direction of the project

This blog post describes the first part above.

Community Working Group posts: Code of Conduct team update: June 15, 2022

Main Drupal Feed - Tue, 06/21/2022 - 18:53

As previously reported, the Community Health Team has started to have regular, bi-weekly meetings in an effort to develop and update the Code of Conduct for the Drupal community.

Community Health Team members present at this week's meeting were

The main goal for this meeting was to get status updates from all tasks discussed at the previous meeting in an effort to better understand the Code of Conduct landscape in other communities. In addition, some updates were provided related to identifying other community stakeholders in the overall process of updating our Code of Conduct.

The following Codes of Conduct were reviewed by individual team members and discussed during the meeting:

Much of the discussion was related to how each Code of Conduct provided examples of negative and/or positive behaviors and the pros and cons of each approach. The level of prescription for infractions was also a common thread in the discussion, including how some CoCs provide very clear and precise guidance while others (like the current Drupal Code of Conduct) provide a great deal of leeway to those responsible for enforcement.

We also discussed the fact that many CoCs are not stand-alone documents, but rely on supporting documents, much like the Drupal Values and Principles.

Finally, a number of Drupal-related groups and individuals have confirmed their willingness to provide feedback to this effort as the process proceeds. If you, or a Drupal-related group, is interested in being part of this process, please let us know at drupal-cwg at drupal dot org.

Community Working Group posts: Code of Conduct team update: June 15, 2022

Main Drupal Feed - Tue, 06/21/2022 - 18:53

As previously reported, the Community Health Team has started to have regular, bi-weekly meetings in an effort to develop and update the Code of Conduct for the Drupal community.

Community Health Team members present at this week's meeting were

The main goal for this meeting was to get status updates from all tasks discussed at the previous meeting in an effort to better understand the Code of Conduct landscape in other communities. In addition, some updates were provided related to identifying other community stakeholders in the overall process of updating our Code of Conduct.

The following Codes of Conduct were reviewed by individual team members and discussed during the meeting:

Much of the discussion was related to how each Code of Conduct provided examples of negative and/or positive behaviors and the pros and cons of each approach. The level of prescription for infractions was also a common thread in the discussion, including how some CoCs provide very clear and precise guidance while others (like the current Drupal Code of Conduct) provide a great deal of leeway to those responsible for enforcement.

We also discussed the fact that many CoCs are not stand-alone documents, but rely on supporting documents, much like the Drupal Values and Principles.

Finally, a number of Drupal-related groups and individuals have confirmed their willingness to provide feedback to this effort as the process proceeds. If you, or a Drupal-related group, is interested in being part of this process, please let us know at drupal-cwg at drupal dot org.

Community Working Group posts: Code of Conduct team update: June 15, 2022

Main Drupal Feed - Tue, 06/21/2022 - 18:53

As previously reported, the Community Health Team has started to have regular, bi-weekly meetings in an effort to develop and update the Code of Conduct for the Drupal community.

Community Health Team members present at this week's meeting were

The main goal for this meeting was to get status updates from all tasks discussed at the previous meeting in an effort to better understand the Code of Conduct landscape in other communities. In addition, some updates were provided related to identifying other community stakeholders in the overall process of updating our Code of Conduct.

The following Codes of Conduct were reviewed by individual team members and discussed during the meeting:

Much of the discussion was related to how each Code of Conduct provided examples of negative and/or positive behaviors and the pros and cons of each approach. The level of prescription for infractions was also a common thread in the discussion, including how some CoCs provide very clear and precise guidance while others (like the current Drupal Code of Conduct) provide a great deal of leeway to those responsible for enforcement.

We also discussed the fact that many CoCs are not stand-alone documents, but rely on supporting documents, much like the Drupal Values and Principles.

Finally, a number of Drupal-related groups and individuals have confirmed their willingness to provide feedback to this effort as the process proceeds. If you, or a Drupal-related group, is interested in being part of this process, please let us know at drupal-cwg at drupal dot org.

Promet Source: No "Small" Drupal Support Contracts

Main Drupal Feed - Tue, 06/21/2022 - 16:33
I was recently thinking about Promet’s engagement with British Columbia’s Knowledge Network, and was reminded of a famous maxim from the theater world: “There are no small parts, only small actors.” I’ve always loved that saying because it drives home the point that excellence at every level and at every point in a process, plants seeds for growth that often exceed expectations. 

Specbee: How to make a Multilingual Website using Drupal 9

Main Drupal Feed - Tue, 06/21/2022 - 09:35
How to make a Multilingual Website using Drupal 9 Shefali Shetty 21 Jun, 2022

It’s a fact. You can’t go global without localized focus. Yeah, that sounds like a  paradox, but it makes sense from a user perspective. Many organizations are reaping the benefits of multilingual web experiences to connect with their customers across the world. And it’s almost a requirement these days. Not only do Multilingual websites enable you to reach new target audiences more effectively, but it adds credibility to your brand, offers familiarity to visitors and makes users more likely to turn into customers.

In a recent research conducted on a list of top 150 global brands across industries, Wikipedia, Google, Nestlé, Airbnb and Adobe emerged as the top 5 brands that scored the best in terms of multilingual support, localization and global user experience. If you’re looking at localizing your brand as you go global, Drupal is a great CMS to opt for because of its fantastic support for multilingual websites. In this article we will describe how Drupal 9's multilingual feature works and how content editors or content teams can utilize the feature.

Multilingual Support Modules

As I mentioned previously, Drupal 9 makes it really easy to build multilingual sites. It offers 4 multilingual support modules that are already built in core. All you have to do is enable them. In your administrator view, go to Extend, select the 4 modules under Multilingual and click on Install.

  1. Configuration Translation Module - This one is not visible for the end users but especially useful for site builders. It translates configuration text like views names, 
  2. Content Translation Module - Allows to translate content entities and types like blocks, comments, taxonomy terms, custom menu links, and more.
  3. Interface Translation Module - Helps translate user interface elements such as Home, Forms, Title, Body, Description, etc. 
  4. Language Module - The real magic happens here. Here’s where you can choose from a whole range of languages (>100) and add it to your configuration.

You can then further configure these modules to have them enabled for all or for only a selected set of content types, entities, configurations or interface elements. 

For more details on each of these modules, make sure you read this article.

Implementing the Multilingual Feature

Once you have enabled these 4 modules, let’s dive right into configuring them.

Step 1: Add a Language (or multiple languages)

In your Drupal 9 admin interface, navigate to Configuration -> Regional and language -> Languages. Once you’re on the Languages page, click on the + Add language button

 

I’ve chosen Spanish as my language and added it to the list of languages.

Once added, you can select it as your default language or have English as the default.

Adding a Language

Step 2: Update Translations

Now click on the right part of the Edit button and you will get two options as a dropdown - Delete and Translate. When you select Translate, your Drupal site gets updated with all the interface and configuration translations for that language from localize.drupal.org. Here thousands of Drupal contributors help translate interface and configuration strings in regional languages.

Importing translations

Step 3: Language switcher

You can add a language switcher block to any region of your page so the user can switch between their preferred languages.

Adding a Language Switcher block

Step 4: Adding translations to content types and entities

You can have translations for all your content types and entities or you can select the ones as per your requirement.

For this, on your Admin screen go to Configuration -> Regional and language -> Content language and translation

I have selected custom language settings for Content, Redirect and URL alias. Under Content, I’m going to only have translations for my “Ad Page” content type (as shown below). All my fields under “Ad Page” content type are selected to be translated.

 

Now we’re all set to add translated content to the required content types.

Translating the Content

Now that you know how to enable and configure the multilingual modules in Drupal 9, let’s move on to learning how to actually translate the content. Let’s look at a super simple, 3 step process on how content teams can leverage this functionality to add their translated content. If you want to read about migrating multilingual content from CSV to Drupal, check out this article.

Step 1: Create a new page or Edit an existing one

Since I had opted to have translations for all my Ad page content types, I have created a test page under this content type. Now you will see that along with the usual View, Edit, Delete and Revisions tabs, I also have a new Translate tab.

  Step 2: Select the Language

On clicking the Translate tab, you will be able to see all your languages listed (see below). Observe that the Spanish language that we added does not have a translation yet. Now click on Add to create a Spanish translation page.

Step 3: Add translated content to the respective field

Notice how all your fields and elements of your admin interface have translated themselves to Spanish (see below). All you have to do is add your translated content as per requirement!

  Step 4: Save and Review!

We’re almost there! After adding in all your translated content, don’t forget to Guardar your translation! :)

And here’s what your Multilingual web page will now look like.

Spanish Version

You will notice the URL generated for the translated version (here Spanish) will contain a language prefix (here: es).

English Version

One of our recent Multilingual projects on Drupal 9 was for SEMI. SEMI is a global industry association that connects more than 1.3 million professionals and 2500 members worldwide through its programs, initiatives, market research and advocacy. SEMI members are responsible for innovation and advancements in electronics manufacturing and design supply chain. With 8 regional offices located around the world, having a multilingual setup was imperative for them to enable focus and customization. Read more about how we helped them build a cohesive multisite, multi language experience with Drupal 9.

https://www.semi.org/region-selector

Final Thoughts

Did you see how easy it was to build a multilingual website in Drupal 9? If you’re looking for Drupal development assistance in creating your next multi language website so you can reach a bigger target audience, feel free to talk to us.

Author: Shefali Shetty

​​Meet Shefali Shetty, Director of Marketing at Specbee. An enthusiast for Drupal, she enjoys exploring and writing about the powerhouse. While not working or actively contributing back to the Drupal project, you can find her watching YouTube videos trying to learn to play the Ukulele :)

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  Recent Blogs Image How to make a Multilingual Website using Drupal 9 Image Creating custom design systems with Tailwind CSS and implementing it in Drupal Image Build marketing landing pages quickly and easily with Drupal 9 Want to extract the maximum out of Drupal? TALK TO US Featured Success Stories

Upgrading and consolidating multiple web properties to offer a coherent digital experience for Physicians Insurance

Upgrading the web presence of IEEE Information Theory Society, the most trusted voice for advanced technology

Great Southern Homes, one of the fastest growing home builders in the United States, sees greater results with Drupal 9

View all Case Studies

Specbee: How to make a Multilingual Website using Drupal 9

Main Drupal Feed - Tue, 06/21/2022 - 09:35
How to make a Multilingual Website using Drupal 9 Shefali Shetty 21 Jun, 2022

It’s a fact. You can’t go global without localized focus. Yeah, that sounds like a  paradox, but it makes sense from a user perspective. Many organizations are reaping the benefits of multilingual web experiences to connect with their customers across the world. And it’s almost a requirement these days. Not only do Multilingual websites enable you to reach new target audiences more effectively, but it adds credibility to your brand, offers familiarity to visitors and makes users more likely to turn into customers.

In a recent research conducted on a list of top 150 global brands across industries, Wikipedia, Google, Nestlé, Airbnb and Adobe emerged as the top 5 brands that scored the best in terms of multilingual support, localization and global user experience. If you’re looking at localizing your brand as you go global, Drupal is a great CMS to opt for because of its fantastic support for multilingual websites. In this article we will describe how Drupal 9's multilingual feature works and how content editors or content teams can utilize the feature.

Multilingual Support Modules

As I mentioned previously, Drupal 9 makes it really easy to build multilingual sites. It offers 4 multilingual support modules that are already built in core. All you have to do is enable them. In your administrator view, go to Extend, select the 4 modules under Multilingual and click on Install.

  1. Configuration Translation Module - This one is not visible for the end users but especially useful for site builders. It translates configuration text like views names, 
  2. Content Translation Module - Allows to translate content entities and types like blocks, comments, taxonomy terms, custom menu links, and more.
  3. Interface Translation Module - Helps translate user interface elements such as Home, Forms, Title, Body, Description, etc. 
  4. Language Module - The real magic happens here. Here’s where you can choose from a whole range of languages (>100) and add it to your configuration.

You can then further configure these modules to have them enabled for all or for only a selected set of content types, entities, configurations or interface elements. 

For more details on each of these modules, make sure you read this article.

Implementing the Multilingual Feature

Once you have enabled these 4 modules, let’s dive right into configuring them.

Step 1: Add a Language (or multiple languages)

In your Drupal 9 admin interface, navigate to Configuration -> Regional and language -> Languages. Once you’re on the Languages page, click on the + Add language button

 

I’ve chosen Spanish as my language and added it to the list of languages.

Once added, you can select it as your default language or have English as the default.

Adding a Language

Step 2: Update Translations

Now click on the right part of the Edit button and you will get two options as a dropdown - Delete and Translate. When you select Translate, your Drupal site gets updated with all the interface and configuration translations for that language from localize.drupal.org. Here thousands of Drupal contributors help translate interface and configuration strings in regional languages.

Importing translations

Step 3: Language switcher

You can add a language switcher block to any region of your page so the user can switch between their preferred languages.

Adding a Language Switcher block

Step 4: Adding translations to content types and entities

You can have translations for all your content types and entities or you can select the ones as per your requirement.

For this, on your Admin screen go to Configuration -> Regional and language -> Content language and translation

I have selected custom language settings for Content, Redirect and URL alias. Under Content, I’m going to only have translations for my “Ad Page” content type (as shown below). All my fields under “Ad Page” content type are selected to be translated.

 

Now we’re all set to add translated content to the required content types.

Translating the Content

Now that you know how to enable and configure the multilingual modules in Drupal 9, let’s move on to learning how to actually translate the content. Let’s look at a super simple, 3 step process on how content teams can leverage this functionality to add their translated content. If you want to read about migrating multilingual content from CSV to Drupal, check out this article.

Step 1: Create a new page or Edit an existing one

Since I had opted to have translations for all my Ad page content types, I have created a test page under this content type. Now you will see that along with the usual View, Edit, Delete and Revisions tabs, I also have a new Translate tab.

  Step 2: Select the Language

On clicking the Translate tab, you will be able to see all your languages listed (see below). Observe that the Spanish language that we added does not have a translation yet. Now click on Add to create a Spanish translation page.

Step 3: Add translated content to the respective field

Notice how all your fields and elements of your admin interface have translated themselves to Spanish (see below). All you have to do is add your translated content as per requirement!

  Step 4: Save and Review!

We’re almost there! After adding in all your translated content, don’t forget to Guardar your translation! :)

And here’s what your Multilingual web page will now look like.

Spanish Version

You will notice the URL generated for the translated version (here Spanish) will contain a language prefix (here: es).

English Version

One of our recent Multilingual projects on Drupal 9 was for SEMI. SEMI is a global industry association that connects more than 1.3 million professionals and 2500 members worldwide through its programs, initiatives, market research and advocacy. SEMI members are responsible for innovation and advancements in electronics manufacturing and design supply chain. With 8 regional offices located around the world, having a multilingual setup was imperative for them to enable focus and customization. Read more about how we helped them build a cohesive multisite, multi language experience with Drupal 9.

https://www.semi.org/region-selector

Final Thoughts

Did you see how easy it was to build a multilingual website in Drupal 9? If you’re looking for Drupal development assistance in creating your next multi language website so you can reach a bigger target audience, feel free to talk to us.

Author: Shefali Shetty

​​Meet Shefali Shetty, Director of Marketing at Specbee. An enthusiast for Drupal, she enjoys exploring and writing about the powerhouse. While not working or actively contributing back to the Drupal project, you can find her watching YouTube videos trying to learn to play the Ukulele :)

Drupal 9 Drupal Development Drupal Planet Subscribe to our Newsletter Now Subscribe Leave this field blank

Leave us a Comment

  Recent Blogs Image How to make a Multilingual Website using Drupal 9 Image Creating custom design systems with Tailwind CSS and implementing it in Drupal Image Build marketing landing pages quickly and easily with Drupal 9 Want to extract the maximum out of Drupal? TALK TO US Featured Success Stories

Upgrading and consolidating multiple web properties to offer a coherent digital experience for Physicians Insurance

Upgrading the web presence of IEEE Information Theory Society, the most trusted voice for advanced technology

Great Southern Homes, one of the fastest growing home builders in the United States, sees greater results with Drupal 9

View all Case Studies

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